Are those advance features in cameras slowly depriving our creativity?


Dslrman

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#1
Just a muse. This topic I believed it has already been discussed many times to a yawn. But I would like to explore another angle and to share a probable scenario:

Just imagine, if technological advancement has let to the development of an ultimate camera system which offers the highest of megapixels, multiple exposure recording, fastest auto-focusing and frame-per-second shutter speed, zoom lens which is on par of any prime lenses, flash strobes that do not need re-cycle time, etc.. Basically, its like all your wishes for a camera had come true with this system.

Let say you go for a shoot (can be event, street, wildlife, etc.). You just need to secure a best spot and wait for the event to start and all you have to do is just press and hold and let the camera keep firing like a machine gun without the need of re-loading. When the event ends you simply just check and delete away and keep only those few shots which you think are picture worthy. And back to your home with your laptop plugged in, and since all your shots are of highest megapixels, you can simply crop to any composition till your heart delight.

Till then, photography is not really a skill at all (besides some selecting skills, composition skill, pp skill, perhaps?). The real photography skill lies merely in the knowledge and timing of knowing securing the best spot (ie. in event, street, wildlife, etc.) to take photos.
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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#2
Just a muse. This topic I believed it has already been discussed many times to a yawn. But I would like to explore another angle and to share a probable scenario:

Just imagine, if technological advancement has let to the development of an ultimate camera system which offers the highest of megapixels, multiple exposure recording, fastest auto-focusing and frame-per-second shutter speed, zoom lens which is on par of any prime lenses, flash strobes that do not need re-cycle time, etc.. Basically, its like all your wishes for a camera had come true with this system.

Let say you go for a shoot (can be event, street, wildlife, etc.). You just need to secure a best spot and wait for the event to start and all you have to do is just press and hold and let the camera keep firing like a machine gun without the need of re-loading. When the event ends you simply just check and delete away and keep only those few shots which you think are picture worthy. And back to your home with your laptop plugged in, and since all your shots are of highest megapixels, you can simply crop to any composition till your heart delight.

Till then, photography is not really a skill at all (besides some selecting skills, composition skill, pp skill, perhaps?). The real photography skill lies merely in the knowledge and timing of knowing securing the best spot (ie. in event, street, wildlife, etc.) to take photos.
You'll then have to understand the difference between holding a camera and using a camera... or basically, a photographer and a camera-man.
 

night86mare

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#3
Let say you go for a shoot (can be event, street, wildlife, etc.). You just need to secure a best spot and wait for the event to start and all you have to do is just press and hold and let the camera keep firing like a machine gun without the need of re-loading. When the event ends you simply just check and delete away and keep only those few shots which you think are picture worthy. And back to your home with your laptop plugged in, and since all your shots are of highest megapixels, you can simply crop to any composition till your heart delight.
soon, you will run out of shutter count very fast and need to replace your shutter.

not to mention, everytime you filter through photographs you want to cry and die.

no thanks, i'll take my shots at being unadvanced and caveman-like by waiting for the right moment and risk missing it.
 

Dslrman

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#4
Thanks for the input, guys. But aren't these the workflow the hallmarks of a digital camera photo taking technique? (take many shots, then choose the best ones?).

Personally I am not in the favour of digital automation, btw. I do respect the "one shot one photo" policy. But I do hope along the way someone can throw a new light on the benefit of having those digital automation.

So far, the digital automation argument is not in the favour, since the past.
 

night86mare

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#5
erm, while i am not a fan of the "one shot, one kill" mentality because that is quite silly to me,

but there's a difference between a machine gun joe taking 2000 anyhow-shots and trying to save 2 out of the pile, versus someone who puts thought into every shot and filters out 2 out of the 5 that they have taken, for example.

sure, no one sees the success rate, and maybe machine gun joe might get better shots, but i highly doubt that this would be the case in the long(er) run.
 

night86mare

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#7
Technology will never replace humans gifted with artistic creativity, expressions and interpretations. ;)
well i don't think machine gun joe has the drive to try to find new perspectives or angles or climb a tall mountain to machine gun his camera.....

well, until we invent cameras that take photos by themselves.

then photography might possibly be dead by then, but i'm sure we'll come up with something else. :)
 

Leong23

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#8
Wow, if really so good. When i step out of my house, i will machine gun my shutter till i reach home, confirm everyday got good shot. :bsmilie:
 

night86mare

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#11
Confirm got something to bring home......i love technology!!!!! :heart::heart:

wa, your macro lens bump into caterpillar and you machine gun out a masterpiece.

really not bad, this shot. i wish i had such luck. :bsmilie:
 

night86mare

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#12
today i was walking about city hall then i didn't realise that i had my camera on bulb mode for 2 minutes, and i was pressing down the shutter for that long.. :sweatsm:

very lucky, out of the 200 shots of 2 minute exposures this one didn't come out overexposed, i think because just then i anyhow put my nd110 on top..



:bsmilie:
 

wildcat

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#17
today i was walking about city hall then i didn't realise that i had my camera on bulb mode for 2 minutes, and i was pressing down the shutter for that long.. :sweatsm:
Well, my camera is better than your camera. I will leave it on the table, set it on "auto" and then the camera started moving and zooming in by itself to compose and when ready, it just shoots on it's own. 99% of the time, is not bad.

Hint: it's not a Pentax...
 

Dslrman

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#18
"One shot one kill" is just a state of mind, and an aspiration ones hope to achieve. Actually its rather "one shot, many misses" for me. But at least this way it works for me coz I am more prudent when taking shots. But when I really gets the "kill" the satisfaction is higher. I am not a fan of continuosly firing whenever the subject moves, then to select the best shots. Its kinda like the next steps towards the machine gun joe mentality.


erm, while i am not a fan of the "one shot, one kill" mentality because that is quite silly to me,

but there's a difference between a machine gun joe taking 2000 anyhow-shots and trying to save 2 out of the pile, versus someone who puts thought into every shot and filters out 2 out of the 5 that they have taken, for example.

sure, no one sees the success rate, and maybe machine gun joe might get better shots, but i highly doubt that this would be the case in the long(er) run.
 

Dslrman

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#19
You suddenly give me a meme!

With our present digital camera technology, we are not depriving our creativity at all.

For proof? Check out camera tossing technique :)


well i don't think machine gun joe has the drive to try to find new perspectives or angles or climb a tall mountain to machine gun his camera.....

well, until we invent cameras that take photos by themselves.

then photography might possibly be dead by then, but i'm sure we'll come up with something else. :)
 

Dslrman

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#20
That is the last thing any photog would want to see it happens.

There are already robots that automatically play the violin, assemble cars, etc. If any smart guy going to invent a robotic camera that can hover about any direction mid-air and take 360 degree photos with different zoom ranges and most importantly, with the cost of a full frame DSLR. By then...:embrass:

PS: I tried to strain my eyes to see the brand. I thought this suppose to be a top secret project for Nikon. Who leaked this out :D


Well, my camera is better than your camera. I will leave it on the table, set it on "auto" and then the camera started moving and zooming in by itself to compose and when ready, it just shoots on it's own. 99% of the time, is not bad.

Hint: it's not a Pentax...
 

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