aperture


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Sep 16, 2008
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#1
is a recommended way to take silhouette photo is to have a lower F aperture number as it allows more light to reach the image sensor??:dunno:
 

night86mare

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#3
is a recommended way to take silhouette photo is to have a lower F aperture number as it allows more light to reach the image sensor??:dunno:
aperture primarily affects depth of field

you can use it to vary exposure, but what you have written above is a wrong concept.
 

tabako

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#4
aperture primarily affects depth of field

you can use it to vary exposure, but what you have written above is a wrong concept.
Eh not true I think, I used to work as a photography assistant for my uncle years ago when I was in Sec school.

He always get the correct aperture and exposure, then shoot a couple more with varying aperture to get some varying exposures. But that was when a medium format film camera was used.
 

gymak90

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#5
I would rather you play with shutter speed than aperture. Since night86mare has pointed out, changing aperture changes depth of field.

So if you allowed more light to reach your sensor, both your subject and background will be oxerexposed together. This surely won't result in a silhouette.
 

night86mare

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#6
Eh not true I think, I used to work as a photography assistant for my uncle years ago when I was in Sec school.

He always get the correct aperture and exposure, then shoot a couple more with varying aperture to get some varying exposures. But that was when a medium format film camera was used.
what is not true?

that is called bracketing, when film is used, they want to make sure they get the correct exposure, so just vary just in case.

usually bracketing is vary SHUTTER SPEED though.
 

Octarine

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#7
is a recommended way to take silhouette photo is to have a lower F aperture number as it allows more light to reach the image sensor??:dunno:
Your concept would only work if you keep a constant shutter speed. Then the opening of aperture will increase the amount of light. Modern cameras in their various modes (except Manual) have a compensation function. The moment you open the aperture the camera will compensate by changing the shutter speed (and sometimes also ISO) in order to maintain correct exposure.
All the rest: see catchlight's and night86mare's posting.
 

catchlights

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#8
what is not true?

that is called bracketing, when film is used, they want to make sure they get the correct exposure, so just vary just in case.

usually bracketing is vary SHUTTER SPEED though.
the is when you are shooting with contentious light source.
in studio shooting with flash, either very the flash output or change the aperture for bracketing, but it is gonne be a nightmare changing the power output if the set up have multiple lights, so it is easier to just change the aperture.
 

night86mare

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#9
the is when you are shooting with contentious light source.
in studio shooting with flash, either very the flash output or change the aperture for bracketing, but it is gonne be a nightmare changing the power output if the set up have multiple lights, so it is easier to just change the aperture.
ah, i never shoot studio much

thanks for the heads up :)
 

Jan 28, 2009
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#10
is a recommended way to take silhouette photo is to have a lower F aperture number as it allows more light to reach the image sensor??:dunno:
Actually, the "lower" the F aperture number, the larger the aperture. F/2 is larger than f/22.

Agree w/ 1st reply, easiest way is meter background, exposure lock, and re-compose.
 

V

vince123123

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#11
Actually I believe both shutter and aperture is used to bracket. Which to use depends on the subject and the lighting used. There's no real rule to say you use one over the other. For example, night86mare is used to landscapes, and since in landscapes the light is continuous and the subjects don't move, he uses shutter speed, since aperture will introduce the DOF differences. In studio, like catchlights, we use aperture to bracket because shutter speed has little/no effect. There will be DOF differences but there's no choice if bracketing is required.

To answer the TS's question, just follow what catchlights said in Post #2 - the idea is to make sure your subject is metered darker than the background. If both the subject and background is of equal lighting intensity, then you will never get a silhouette.
 

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tabako

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#12
what is not true?

that is called bracketing, when film is used, they want to make sure they get the correct exposure, so just vary just in case.

usually bracketing is vary SHUTTER SPEED though.
Yup u r right, I forgot the medium format camera shutter speed also adjust in front. And he also adjust aperture as well. so both lah.
 

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