aperture


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crysmatch

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May 2, 2008
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#1
what f stop number considered big or small, so i can achieve depth of field or blur background? i'm using nikon D40, 18-55, 55-200 lens.3.5-5.6G. can i shoot landscape in fstop4.5 n achieve depth of field? THANKS
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#3
what f stop number considered big or small, so i can achieve depth of field or blur background? i'm using nikon D40, 18-55, 55-200 lens.3.5-5.6G. can i shoot landscape in fstop4.5 n achieve depth of field? THANKS
To achieve greater DOF, aperture has to be smaller (bigger f number) and distance to the subject be further as well.
 

Jun 24, 2008
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#4
I'm wondering this question too...

can I ask what's the meaning of the "distance to the subject be further"?

does it means you can zoom, and use the lowest focal point to achieve the blur background? a little confused
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#5
it's that time of the year again



anyways, for last question, it is PHYSICAL distance from your camera to the subject, versus PHYSICAL distance from your camera to background.

it is not really applicable for most scenes (which is why actually i don't know why snoweagle mentioned it, maybe he didn't read the question properly) or landscapes.

i have one suggestion, read sulhan's guide, and TRY OUT what he is showing you, i do not see it very difficult to understand after experimentation. since his guide is actually already very dumbed down and simplistic, even has pictures to show you what he is talking about. all read and no action is not going to teach you anything. shooting more and thinking critically is the way to go when it comes to learning for photography.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#6
I'm wondering this question too...

can I ask what's the meaning of the "distance to the subject be further"?

does it means you can zoom, and use the lowest focal point to achieve the blur background? a little confused
Yr statement is a bit contradicting. If u want to achieve a blurred background, how can the DOF be great? Try taking close up shots and u'll know what i mean.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#7
it's that time of the year again



anyways, for last question, it is PHYSICAL distance from your camera to the subject, versus PHYSICAL distance from your camera to background.

it is not really applicable for most scenes (which is why actually i don't know why snoweagle mentioned it, maybe he didn't read the question properly) or landscapes.

i have one suggestion, read sulhan's guide, and TRY OUT what he is showing you, i do not see it very difficult to understand after experimentation. since his guide is actually already very dumbed down and simplistic, even has pictures to show you what he is talking about. all read and no action is not going to teach you anything. shooting more and thinking critically is the way to go when it comes to learning for photography.
It does, go experiment it out and u'll know what i mean. No point reading up too much theory when there's no practical.
 

night86mare

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It does, go experiment it out and u'll know what i mean. No point reading up too much theory when there's no practical.
for the typical landscape shot, you would not have too much difference in subject to camera distance and camera to background distance to get any form of bokeh or oof.

very rare, i would say once in a blue moon.

of course i know what you mean, 90% of my shots are landscapes, rofl.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#9
for the typical landscape shot, you would not have too much difference in subject to camera distance and camera to background distance to get any form of bokeh or oof.

very rare, i would say once in a blue moon.

of course i know what you mean, 90% of my shots are landscapes, rofl.
That's what i've been trying to implicate. TS's last question is whether he can achieve depth of field at f/4.5 (presumably a great DOF as it's landscape). Yes he can but if looked carefully, the DOF still would be shallower than that taken at f/8 or f/11.
 

crysmatch

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May 2, 2008
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#10
thanks... i just curious, cos my eyes unlike u guys pro. so rather difficult 4 me to see n make real diference between shallow n depth if that's not obvious.. just try to practice..
 

Jul 31, 2006
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#11
IMO, most of the time your audience's eyes are not better than yours. Therefore do not worry to much about that. There are manything to consider regarding to the DOF and bokeh, but end of the day, an eye pleasing photograph is considered OK, else, not OK.
 

windwaver

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May 19, 2007
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#12
what f stop number considered big or small, so i can achieve depth of field or blur background? i'm using nikon D40, 18-55, 55-200 lens.3.5-5.6G. can i shoot landscape in fstop4.5 n achieve depth of field? THANKS
Aye, seriously, when I shoot landscape, I'll set the sharpest f that particular lens can take and shoot (normally it's a BIG number (small aperture)) :)
 

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