Anyone tried Vibram Fivefingers ?


giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#1
Anyone runs or treks with Vibram shoes ? Supposedly a closer alternative to actual barefoot running, i wonder how much benefit it does to ankles and knees ?

* i was looking for trekking shoes and my friend happened to talk about them and got me slightly interested. Looks kinda funky ..

http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/index.htm

Ryan
 

Yapster

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Aug 12, 2006
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#2
Anyone runs or treks with Vibram shoes ? Supposedly a closer alternative to actual barefoot running, i wonder how much benefit it does to ankles and knees ?

* i was looking for trekking shoes and my friend happened to talk about them and got me slightly interested. Looks kinda funky ..

http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/index.htm

Ryan
Yea, i saw some recommendation on this shoe when i was looking for water grip shoes.

Seems like adidas follow this design too, bro.

http://www.sandalsslippers.com/mens-shoes-adidas-water-grip-c-1_10.html?page=2&sort=20a

I bought those in page one though. Design different though. :)

I remember i saw an article on trekking vs water gripping is totally opposite. For water grip, the profile should be more fine while for trekking, it should be more coarse for the grip.

Pardon my non technical term. :embrass:
 

Dream Merchant

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#3
I read somewhere (in very small fine letters on one site that ... ) that 'they are NOT for everyone'.

Consult a physiotherapist and podiatrist ... if in doubt. ;)
 

giantcanopy

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#4
My orthopod friends say go ahead and try ;p;p;p

But I heard the style of walking will have to change.
Maybe like crocs it will pick up momentum and change the way people walk

Ryan
 

ahbian

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May 23, 2006
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#5
My friend has really wide feet which hurts when wearing shoes designed for mainstream people.

So he swears by the fivefingers for trekking.

In fact, he wore the five fingers for the first 2 days of Annapurna trekking before he changed to warmer shoes at higher altitude. Comfort wise, he commented that it was like walking barefooted.

And it was a definite conversation starter among locals met during the trek. :bsmilie:
 

ahyooo

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Jun 1, 2010
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#7
i've been wearing vibram 5 fingers for almost 6mths. i use for running on treadmill and workout in gym.

yes its light and like walking barefoot, comfortable. no injuries.

for trekking there are another models which are more durable/waterproof..

walking wit vibram 5 fingers n armed wit ninja umbrella will inviting long stares :bigeyes: and they will mistaken u as a ninja assassin..

http://www.diskursdisko.de/2009/03/ninja-umbrella/

Heheheheeee :bsmilie:
 

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limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#8
Giantcanopy, it is interesting that you raised this thread.
I saw something like this some days back when I was shopping around in Isetan Parkway Parade.
It is certainly a very novel idea.
Only thing that was in my mind was - does it give sufficient support to, say, the ankles? Cos the soles seem a little thin as compared to all the other jogging shoes that we are so used to wearing, that have historically emphasized on the importance of seemingly thicker soles that give more shock absorption.
Just a question that I ask myself.
But for US$75 a pair, actually no harm trying it out.
What do you think?
 

sebastiansong

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#9
I have a pair...

basically the usual rules apply... break into anything new (shoes, running style) slowly.
I started from 1 km jog and slowly built up to 4 km jog without stopping.
I noticed that once you get tired, your form will give way and you will feel pain. You should monitor the threshold and stop BEFORE your form gives way. Don be too eager for progress.

as for hiking, five finger offers little cushioning (there are models that offer more protection but it kinda go against the principle of barefoot) and trails can give ur "barefeet" lots of "stimulating" sensation. Again take it easy. Bring a spare pair of shoe, if it hurts too badly, swap shoes.

if u wanna read up, try "Born to Run", one of the best books on barefoot running.
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#10
So if use for trekking and such, will feel every stone?
 

giantcanopy

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#11
Great input guys. Limwhow , my thoughts exactly, why not try a pair :bsmilie:

There is an interesting study and read by Havard on heel strike / forefoot strike and the merits of barefoot / minimal shod running. But of course as usual no large scale RCTs ( randomised controlled trials ) to go about strongly recommending it over shod running. The benefits will not be so acutely apparent ( since now u need to tone up foot muscles which probably will be much degenerate in most of us heel strikers , and i heard from a fellow marathon friend of mine, bad calve aches initially ), but as mentioned it tries to reduce repetitive stress injuries, we might see less of chronic ankle problems and common issues like plantar fasciitis

Here is the link :
http://www.barefootrunning.fas.harvard.edu/4BiomechanicsofFootStrike.html

for those savy in biophysical aspects of stuffs, they quoted recent articles from NATURE, which can be downloaded as pdf from the site.

( ok i am not an avid runner, and i must admit it is the funky look that got me interested )

Ryan
 

Zichar

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Apr 22, 2008
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#12
Sebastian's reply is spot on
Need time to get used to, a break in period and that your form is important
Get ready for some sore calves at the beginning! As they are muscles that are rarely used in the normal gait
Born to Run is indeed a good book to start with
I rarely see the fivefingers in action here though - a couple of occasions met a few runners at the clarke quay area running in them

Reportage: That's part of the charm/enjoyment of running and walking barefoot, to feel the ground beneath your feet
 

Zichar

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Apr 22, 2008
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#13
Lol was typing my reply when you replied
There are 'bridge' efforts - the lightest Nike Frees were one such
ecco also has a running shoe that was supposed to emulate barefoot running; looks chunkier in real life, so's the price!
 

kei1309

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Apr 12, 2010
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#14
walking wit vibram 5 fingers n armed wit ninja umbrella will inviting long stares :bigeyes: and they will mistaken u as a ninja assassin..

http://www.diskursdisko.de/2009/03/ninja-umbrella/

Heheheheeee :bsmilie:
saw those fivefingers before. but erm... don't think i'll get it. not really made for biking haha.

but as for this umbrella... it's sold in singapore. saw it at Fourskin at heeren the other day.
 

vngks

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#15
For the young ones and for low impact activities, go ahead and use it. My gym trainer swears by it.

However, if your a middle age fella like me with knee problems, I'll stick to Asics (or other good brand) for max cushioning.

Cheers.
 

limwhow

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#16
For the young ones and for low impact activities, go ahead and use it. My gym trainer swears by it.

However, if your a middle age fella like me with knee problems, I'll stick to Asics (or other good brand) for max cushioning.

Cheers.
So, vngks, what do you think of trekking in Lukla with this Fiverfinger shoes?
(Serious question, serious question one. Want to ask your opinion.)
 

#17
I heard about barefoot running in one of the ChannelNewsAsia Primetime Morning broadcasts. The expert mentioned that it originated from the Mexican Tarahumara Indians. Apparantly, running barefooted will change the way you land on your foot. You'll learn not to land on your heels (it hurts when you do it barefooted) and eventually improve your posture in walking, subsequently reaping health benefits.
 

vngks

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#18
limwhow said:
So, vngks, what do you think of trekking in Lukla with this Fiverfinger shoes?
(Serious question, serious question one. Want to ask your opinion.)
Haha no way man! My trainer said he loves the 5fingers becos it makes u work the stabilizing muscles more, definitely glute work harder too.

Also u need ankle support for us first timers to trekking.

Cheers.
 

bylim

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Sep 2, 2009
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#19
When you run barefoot it is not natural for your body to heelstrike. You'll tend to lean forward more when you run barefooted. Try it for yourself.

I heard about barefoot running in one of the ChannelNewsAsia Primetime Morning broadcasts. The expert mentioned that it originated from the Mexican Tarahumara Indians. Apparantly, running barefooted will change the way you land on your foot. You'll learn not to land on your heels (it hurts when you do it barefooted) and eventually improve your posture in walking, subsequently reaping health benefits.
 

limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#20
Haha no way man! My trainer said he loves the 5fingers becos it makes u work the stabilizing muscles more, definitely glute work harder too.

Also u need ankle support for us first timers to trekking.

Cheers.
Ok, man. Listen to your advice, I will.
Interesting principle, still, this FiveFinger. Strengthens the calves and the gluteus.
Should be good.
 

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