any lens recommendation for shooting model?


Junqi Ng

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Jan 19, 2015
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#1
Dear all,

i have own a kit lens 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM.

i would like to upgrade my lens with low budget 500-800 any recommendation?

85mm f1.8 will it be a good choice?
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#2
Dear all,

i have own a kit lens 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM.

i would like to upgrade my lens with low budget 500-800 any recommendation?

85mm f1.8 will it be a good choice?
if Bokeh is what you are looking for...
than the short answer is Yes.

but if you want to know more shooting portraits, I would recommend read up more on basic photography and portrait shooting, it will cost less in give better results.
 

SkyStrike

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Nov 29, 2010
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#3
I think Catchlights have pretty much summed it up.

OTOH, it may be a good idea now for you to realize that generally, there is no such thing like "Lens for shooting <insert genre>" (extreme genre like Astro/Birding etc or other likes asides). Each lens have their use. It depends on the user.


And for 85mm, you need to consider about the working distance you have. Especially indoors where space is extremely limited.

*not sure if this is any way related to what you want to shoot. But You may also want to consider reading this old article: http://blog.zhangjingna.com/2010/10/equipment-and-where-money-comes-from.html *
 

coolthought

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2008
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#4
Prime lenses without distortion like 35mm and 50mm are good for portraits as well. Including 85mm, your consideration is at distance you like to stand away from the model, half or whole body, compression of background (or no need at all to consider) and the bokeh you like.
 

Zeisser

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Jul 12, 2008
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#5
My favourite lens is the 24-85mm which include studio, portraiture and coverage of events. Most importantly
is your own feel of what the lens can give you.
 

trd2970

Senior Member
Jun 8, 2005
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#7
85 1.8 will be a great portraits lens within your budget
 

Nikonzen

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2014
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#9
When I think of portraits I am in classical mode so I am thinking 85, 105, and 135 focal lengths. When I need 24, 35, or 50 I'm more thinking street shooting maybe documentary as opposed to portraiture. That is just me... :)

My advice is to study carefully your options and there are a bunch of them for you. Crawl before walk. Walk before run. Maybe no need to upgrade lens for example. Maybe better to get strobes or reflectors etc instead and save money for when you are better grounded and understand your needs and desires with more clarity.

If you insist though the 85 is an excellent portrait focal length...it is my understanding that 85 was the premier focal length for fashion shooters back in the day. (Perhaps it still is...maybe brother Leon knows and will say something about that???) That would make it more of a figure lens rather than a close framed head and shoulders shooter. Mind I am talking full frame here.

Just about any short tele is a good portrait focal length.
 

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catchlights

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#11
TS is having a 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM lens,

at 18mm focal length setting (equivalent to 24mm on FX), is good for environmental portrait

at 24mm focal length setting (equivalent to 35mm on FX), is good for full length shot

at 35mm focal length setting (equivalent to 50mm on FX), is good for three quarter shot

at 50mm focal length setting (equivalent to 50mm on FX), is good for half length shot

at 85mm focal length setting (equivalent to 125mm on FX), is good for head and shoulder shot

at 105mm focal length setting (equivalent to 150mm on FX), is good for close up head shot

this lens is already cover whatever constitute the ideal focal length to create a good portrait,

portraits is not able about giving shallow depth of field, or bokeh, if this is what most people think, than their definition of good portrait is as shallow as the depth of field they are looking for.
 

tenth4

New Member
Jan 16, 2013
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#13
TS, it really depend on your needs and your camera. If you are having a crop body, say Nikon (1.5X crop) or Canon (1.6X crop) then a 85mm 1.8 might be too long for you if you do not have the working space and or to take a full body shot.

35mm (Sigma 1.4 2nd hand is about $350-400-/+) would be a good choice, else 50mm F1.8 (YongNuo - $85 or Canon $120-/+) will be more than enough.

Else if u want more flexibility, u can get an EF 24-105mm F/4 IS.

Used to use it for walk-around and portraits.
 

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JasonB

Deregistered
Jun 2, 2009
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#15
Recommend you the 200mm f/2.0

Its all about the lens. So get the best.
 

catchlights

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#17
Recommend you the 200mm f/2.0

Its all about the lens. So get the best.
No bro... only the best. 400mm f/2.8. The sharpest lens from Nikon. Then portraits will be very sharp.
these set up looks very pro.... :thumbsup:
 

slimer

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Mar 12, 2009
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#18
70-200 f2.8 but over your budget.
 

Zeisser

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Jul 12, 2008
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#19
If you insist though the 85 is an excellent portrait focal length...it is my understanding that 85 was the premier focal length for fashion shooters back in the day. (Perhaps it still is...maybe brother Leon knows and will say something about that???) That would make it more of a figure lens rather than a close framed head and shoulders shooter. Mind I am talking full frame here.

Just about any short tele is a good portrait focal length.
For me I do not have any specifics for using a certain lens for certain scenarios. Just adapt as I go along.
As bro coolthought sharing it's about the distance from the subject.

85/1.4 - Full body.



50/1.4 - Head and shoulder



100/2 Full body



100/2 Portrait in studio



So basically it's one's own desire to create the image that really matters. No hard and fast rules.
 

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