Any avid birdshooters here?


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Mar 14, 2005
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#1
Looking for fellow avid birdshooters to go together to 'hunting' for birds, share tips/techniques and get together follow birdshooters/bird lovers.

Anyone here interested?
 

Jan 2, 2005
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#2
Hi, I'm also a newbie starting out in birding photography. When and where do you always 'shoot bird' ?
 

szekiat

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Jan 19, 2002
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#7
check on the world of nature sub forum. Lots of bird shooters lurking here.... I'm a bird shooter but i'm based in london so its not much use!
 

advrider

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what kind of equipment do you have?

if you only have a 300mm. dont expect too much. my advise is that if you are serious, you need at least 600mm.
 

Garion

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Nov 26, 2002
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#10
what kind of equipment do you have?

if you only have a 300mm. dont expect too much. my advise is that if you are serious, you need at least 600mm.
Not entirely true...but the oft repeated advice most bird shooters will give you is that 'the longer the reach the better'. Here in Singapore the majority of wild birds are very skittish, and wary of human beings, and it is difficult to get under 10m to most of them before they take flight (i.e. disappear). 300mm by itself may be a little too short, but you can use a 1.4x teleconverter to make it 420mm.

I would recommend at least a 400mm focal reach when starting out in wild bird photography...either a 300mm coupled with 1.4x TC or a lens with 400mm native reach. And a camera body with a 1.5x or 1.6x crop factor built in, to maximise your pixels.

Bird photography is not cheap, neither is it easy, but the challenge is what makes it fun and thrilling. :)

There is a small but thriving community of bird photography enthusiasts here in Singapore, present both in CS WoN and other nature forums, just google for 'Avian Watch Asia' or 'Nature Photographic Society'. ;)
 

John Tan

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Aug 28, 2004
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Not entirely true...but the oft repeated advice most bird shooters will give you is that 'the longer the reach the better'. Here in Singapore the majority of wild birds are very skittish, and wary of human beings, and it is difficult to get under 10m to most of them before they take flight (i.e. disappear). 300mm by itself may be a little too short, but you can use a 1.4x teleconverter to make it 420mm.

I would recommend at least a 400mm focal reach when starting out in wild bird photography...either a 300mm coupled with 1.4x TC or a lens with 400mm native reach. And a camera body with a 1.5x or 1.6x crop factor built in, to maximise your pixels.

Bird photography is not cheap, neither is it easy, but the challenge is what makes it fun and thrilling. :)

There is a small but thriving community of bird photography enthusiasts here in Singapore, present both in CS WoN and other nature forums, just google for 'Avian Watch Asia' or 'Nature Photographic Society'. ;)
bro, remember to jio me if u r going...:)
 

dEthANGeL

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Jun 20, 2004
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#13
Not entirely true...but the oft repeated advice most bird shooters will give you is that 'the longer the reach the better'. Here in Singapore the majority of wild birds are very skittish, and wary of human beings, and it is difficult to get under 10m to most of them before they take flight (i.e. disappear). 300mm by itself may be a little too short, but you can use a 1.4x teleconverter to make it 420mm.

I would recommend at least a 400mm focal reach when starting out in wild bird photography...either a 300mm coupled with 1.4x TC or a lens with 400mm native reach. And a camera body with a 1.5x or 1.6x crop factor built in, to maximise your pixels.

Bird photography is not cheap, neither is it easy, but the challenge is what makes it fun and thrilling. :)

There is a small but thriving community of bird photography enthusiasts here in Singapore, present both in CS WoN and other nature forums, just google for 'Avian Watch Asia' or 'Nature Photographic Society'. ;)
Very good advice :thumbsup:

Another thing garion failed to mention - i'd like to stress also - Reach is never enough.

More so if you're out to photograph smallish/skittish birds hidden in dense foilage. You seriously need to have a sharp eye out and a pair of binos to help you spot. For bigger birds of course it'll fill your frame easier.
 

Majest1c

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Aug 21, 2007
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#14
go jurong bird park easiest hahaha..
 

szekiat

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actually, a lot of migrant birds rest in the open areas of JBP as it has ample supplies of food and water. Whether u want to spend the $15 to go in is another thing. Another thing to have is someone who drives. Birds are more approachable by car for some reason.
 

Garion

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go jurong bird park easiest hahaha..
Jurong Birdpark use 50mm also can lar. If u just shoot at birdpark, no pt. invest in the expensive long teles rite..just get a cheapo 50mm will do. :dunno: But szekiat has a point tho..sometimes interesting 'stuff' can be found in and around the birdpark.
 

Mar 14, 2005
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#17
guys...need some advice here.

my eyesight is seriously bad...so alot of times i can only hear the birds but cant see them (not those hiding behind huge trees) and my dad goes " there....that branch there"

so how to spot them in time for a shot ? use camera take too long because FOV too small... :S
 

Garion

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guys...need some advice here.

my eyesight is seriously bad...so alot of times i can only hear the birds but cant see them (not those hiding behind huge trees) and my dad goes " there....that branch there"

so how to spot them in time for a shot ? use camera take too long because FOV too small... :S
One way is by using a small pair of binos slung around your neck to help you spot the birds...a 8x or 10x would suffice. Don't necessarily need to be those expensive, few k kinda binos like Swarovski, Nikon has a pair of affordable & decent binos, I think its the Sportstar series which cost only ard $100 odd.

Another way is to train yourself to locate the bird via its calls..its not easy but it is possible. Practice may make it easier, as well as familiarity with how the bird looks like. (get a bird identification guide book).
 

Ally

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Jul 14, 2004
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end of there
#19
guys...need some advice here.

my eyesight is seriously bad...so alot of times i can only hear the birds but cant see them (not those hiding behind huge trees) and my dad goes " there....that branch there"

so how to spot them in time for a shot ? use camera take too long because FOV too small... :S
I usually keep both eyes open even sighting through SLR/dSLR viewfinder..
Binos very helpful obviously.. Haven't tried digiscoping, not sure if it can help you here..

But the only real way of spotting birds is to go out and try try try..
After a while, you get the knack of it..

Good Luck and Happy Hunting..! ;)
 

Majest1c

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Aug 21, 2007
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#20
Jurong Birdpark use 50mm also can lar. If u just shoot at birdpark, no pt. invest in the expensive long teles rite..just get a cheapo 50mm will do. :dunno: But szekiat has a point tho..sometimes interesting 'stuff' can be found in and around the birdpark.
guess it is cheaper for starters ...
if they really really love being a birdshooter then can venture with other sniper lens :bsmilie:
beside that i think that Jurong birdpark has more variety for starters to practice on first.

once the starter is confident..he can venture into the forest to snipe bird liao ;p
 

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