advantage of slr compared to Dslr?


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Jun 29, 2003
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#1
Hi all,

I was thinking of getting a film slr, because of the price, but after listening to my friend, i realise that DSLRS's have alot more advantages over film, however i have not enough cash for a dslr, and i do have a prosumer digicam at home, anyone can point out the good points of film, to convince me to get one. thanks
 

espn

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#2
- Film has MUCH better DR than DSLRs
- You can't do slides on DSLRs
- You can develop your own negs/pos and prints too
 

icarus

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Jan 27, 2002
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#3
alexljy said:
Hi all,

I was thinking of getting a film slr, because of the price, but after listening to my friend, i realise that DSLRS's have alot more advantages over film, however i have not enough cash for a dslr, and i do have a prosumer digicam at home, anyone can point out the good points of film, to convince me to get one. thanks
Film will force u to think before shooting (quoted from theITguy ;) )
I tend to be triggerhappy when i do digital, as a result most of my digital photos are CMI. Thats just me lah. LOL


:bsmilie:
 

Andy74

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#4
alexljy said:
Hi all,

I was thinking of getting a film slr, because of the price, but after listening to my friend, i realise that DSLRS's have alot more advantages over film, however i have not enough cash for a dslr, and i do have a prosumer digicam at home, anyone can point out the good points of film, to convince me to get one. thanks
A SLR is better in terms of colour. The colour is so far unsurpassed by digital. It can register unlimited colour details as compared to digital. And the thrill and satisfaction of taking a fantastic photo with film is so much more than digital.
 

mpenza

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#5
I got a film slr after using a digital one ;p ability to shoot slides is one major motivation. However, you'll want to get good lenses (which aren't cheap generally, though there're some good and cheap ones like 50mm/1.8) so that you could get the best results.
 

thomas.h

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Apr 14, 2005
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#6
Does seeing your photos only after you develop
them cause a prob to any of you?

im a total newbie and hvnt got e hang of SLRs
and turned out most of my pics after developing
are majorly under!
 

mpenza

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#7
why are them under? are you using manual mode where you set both the aperture and shutter speeds? The camera's metering should be good enough to handle most situation.
 

dkw

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#8
Sincerely, IMO, stick to digital. Easier on the wallet in the long run and easier for experimentation and learning. You can always buy a film cam later if the fancy takes you.

Cheers,
 

flambe

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Apr 26, 2005
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#9
very much agree, especially if you really want to learn and shoot a lot, the cost of film developing will be equivalent to buying in dslr in no time - think of it as "interest free installment" for the dslr...

I recently traded in my F80 and have learned a lot more with my new D70 even tho I've only had it for three weeks. The learning curve is a lot shorter with dslr's. Like what was mentioned earlier, the camera body is actually not as important but your lenses is really the killer app that happens to tend to kill your wallet as well!
 

#10
dkw said:
Sincerely, IMO, stick to digital. Easier on the wallet in the long run and easier for experimentation and learning. You can always buy a film cam later if the fancy takes you.

Cheers,
I agree with dkw. And I personally believe the learning curve is much smoother compared to Film. And afterall, if you have "accidently" came out with bad shots those are vaulable, you can save them upto "certain extend" in Photoshop or GIMP.

Just think a while everytime before your shots, whether you are on Digital or Film. Spamming is possible regardless of medium, and nice shots are also very much possible regardless of the medium.. afterall.. its the photographer behind the camera, who is the important factor... i've seen wonder shots with some homeuse digital cameras like CanonA75. The skills are more important!
 

espn

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#11
mpenza said:
I got a film slr after using a digital one ;p ability to shoot slides is one major motivation. However, you'll want to get good lenses (which aren't cheap generally, though there're some good and cheap ones like 50mm/1.8) so that you could get the best results.
Me too, I'm like you, digital->film :D
 

icarus

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#12
Andy74 said:
A SLR is better in terms of colour. The colour is so far unsurpassed by digital. It can register unlimited colour details as compared to digital. And the thrill and satisfaction of taking a fantastic photo with film is so much more than digital.
Agreed completely. The thrill and satisfaction of looking at Slides through a loupe + lightbox is comparable to..... sex

No kidding :)
:bsmilie:
 

smallaperture

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#13
About a year or so, when dSLR become very affordable to many amateurs, a large majority switched from film to digital. In any portrait or event shoot, I hardly see anyone shooting film already.

Now, a used film camera is now literally DIRT CHEAP. Can alway get a great film cam at some "throwaway" prices. Do check out the BnS in this forum. Or use film cam as a 2nd camera or shoot from time to time to compare and see for yourself.
 

user111

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#14
one advantage of film body is fullframe - if u are a wideangle shooter

it will become a disadvantage if u r a telephoto shooter
 

theITguy

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#15
Film does not neccessary have better DR than DSLR, and is a hassle to bring the best out of the negative. Machine printed photos from negative is as good as digital so long as you get the shot right.


While I am a film (slide for colour, slide and negative for BnW) believer, digital is the way to go if you are not going to print via the darkroom method. A 12 stop negative will not help much if your picture captured is a few big stops (say 7 stop contrast scene) as your normal minilab will not be able to do burning, dodging as they are machine based unless they want to scan few copies and use similar techniques like the Hyper Dynamic Range 2 (or somethine liek that) from Photoshop to merge and recreate the scene, a lot of work also. Shooting digital might give you a 2nd chance immediately to get another shot that might work immediately out of the box.


After saying all these, know what you want your pictures to be end of the day to determine whether you want to buy this or that. I am at this point of time writing something on Presentation, that is the pictures. I would certainly use my digital camera for snapshots, as they are meant to be snapshots. If you like funky and crazy pictures, you can also get a Lomo. DSLR or SLR is just another camera. Do you want to have control over what you want to produce or you are just shoot happy go lucky? Do you want to get into darkroom or pay crazy price for darkroom services? If not I think DSLR might be better unless you are not too highly expecting great results from the negatives/slides. Or if your intention is to project your picture, slide is the way to go, digital can sleep in the coffin.
 

foxtwo

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#17
it's my opinion that dslr is going to cost more in the long run vs slr. you're not going to have to upgrade your slr every 2 years or so to get the next best model, are you? unless you're sure to be satisfied using that one dslr till it finally konks, then yeah, dslr is more cost effective than shooting film.

So you lose instant feedback (along with a host of other options) in slr. no big deal i say. tough it out. get your prints back, learn what went wrong, learn what went right, don't repeat your mistakes, follow what went right. despite what a lot say, shooting film is not about curbing trigger-happiness. what curbs trigger-happiness should be a poor composition. but you have to shoot a lot before you learn what composition is. so, shoot a lot to learn composition faster, then shoot at your own rate with good composition. not all will be keepers, but they won't be going into the bin either.
 

rafiano

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Jul 19, 2004
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#18
well...i am a newbie and i have a digital and film SLR. Its true that the learning curve is faster for the digital SLR. I tend to take more pictures and learn more mistakes from the digital SLR. Digital SLR gives you immediate feedback and let you discard the poor composition that you have taken. I usually shoot sports, thus it does help to check on the pictures...else I would spend a fortune on developing film and later getting a heartache realising my shots were under.

However...I bought film as I could not afford a DSLR at that time...and at the end of the day...its the money that talks...

So...if you can wait...save money and get a DSLR..if you cannot wait...get a film SLR...and start shooting. At the end of the day...its the photographer...not the camera. You need to practice, make mistakes and learn. Just have the confidence to press the trigger.

Cheers
 

obewan

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#19
icarus said:
Agreed completely. The thrill and satisfaction of looking at Slides through a loupe + lightbox is comparable to..... sex

No kidding :)
:bsmilie:
James like that also can... Just wondering what pictures are you taking. :bsmilie:

Just Kidding...
 

Ah Pao

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#20
- Film SLRs are usually lighter in weight (compared within the same class)
- Easier to use (no need to fiddle with so many options)
- Way longer battery life.
 

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