About the dust in lenses


Oct 29, 2014
114
3
18
Clementi
#1
So I'm no stranger to dust in lenses. My very first lenses were all zooms with extending barrels so dust isn't that uncommon. As far as I know, even weather-sealed prime lenses can get dust inside the lens. My 100mm L Macro that I lend my friends to use almost every other month has a fair amount of very fine dust that is visible only on close inspection. Most of the time this is alright since the dust doesn't show up in photos anyways. It doesn't bother me but for others, that's a different story. I'm curious to know, are there any methods to reduce the amount of dust getting into lenses if I don't shoot in clean rooms all the time?
 

Ah Keong

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
603
8
18
North
#2
I would pay extra attention to the rear lens cap and also the lens mount flange (and also the camera body lens mount flange).
Majority of the dirt, dust usually stick on these two areas and when mounting and dismounting, dirt and dust would drop in.
 

keithwee

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 20, 2010
8,022
46
48
LittleRedDot
#3
Nothing much you can do unless you are willing to pay for a coat for the lens but its always a good habit to use a blower or cloth to wipe down the dust before returning the lens to the dry cabinet.
 

Oct 29, 2014
114
3
18
Clementi
#4
I would pay extra attention to the rear lens cap and also the lens mount flange (and also the camera body lens mount flange).
Majority of the dirt, dust usually stick on these two areas and when mounting and dismounting, dirt and dust would drop in.
That's a fair point. But sometimes I find dust on the rear elements when I'm cleaning my lenses after a shoot. Would using a dust blower be recommended if I am unable to brush it away?

Some canon lenses also have this felt lining in the rear of the lens on the inner walls where the bigger dust often stick to. Is it safe to use scotch tape and try to stick away the dust if brushing away doesn't work?
 

Likes: Ah Keong
Oct 29, 2014
114
3
18
Clementi
#5
Nothing much you can do unless you are willing to pay for a coat for the lens but its always a good habit to use a blower or cloth to wipe down the dust before returning the lens to the dry cabinet.
Yup I do wipe them down too! But the dust still gets in somehow. I suppose its inevitable, but I'd still like to know just how much one can possibly reduce the dust from getting in. The coating sounds pretty interesting though, never heard of coatings for camera equipment. Does it more or less seal the gaps in the lens save for the mount?
 

keithwee

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 20, 2010
8,022
46
48
LittleRedDot
#6
hi,

there's a few ways, with the easiest being a lens-coat but that only does so much. Alternatively you can do an i-coat if u wan to really protect the equipment as much as possible. Do note that with lenses, mounting and dismounting them will still leave the back elements exposed too.

You can read more about the i-coat process here, I've friends who have done this for their camera equipment.
 

Ah Keong

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
603
8
18
North
#7
That's a fair point. But sometimes I find dust on the rear elements when I'm cleaning my lenses after a shoot. Would using a dust blower be recommended if I am unable to brush it away?

Some canon lenses also have this felt lining in the rear of the lens on the inner walls where the bigger dust often stick to. Is it safe to use scotch tape and try to stick away the dust if brushing away doesn't work?
usually, I will blow before using brush. If still cannot, I would use the Q-tip with zeiss lens cleaning fluid then do a wipe down in a circular fashion from center to outer circle of the rear element.

for the inner wall, I would use the Q-tip with zeiss fluid to do a wipe down. Or you may want to use the zeiss lens wipes (more for travel use during emergency)
 

Bukitimah

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2010
1,269
6
38
Singapore
#8
when i first started, i clean my lenses everytime i used them before putting them into mybdry cabinet. this habits seem to stop after a few years. frankly, i don't seem to notice any dust in my photo other than those found on the sensor when i shoot at very high aperture.

of course cleaning and mai taining of your equipment is important. but in my opinion, you cannot control the environment to ensure every shoot is totally dust free.
 

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