A filter which does what I need?


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Vulpix0r

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Oct 2, 2002
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#1
Well, my current A40 fastest shutter speed is xxx, is there any filters I can use to slow light down further, so that I don't have to buy a new camera? What I want to achieve or emulate is an even faster shutter speed affect without buying a new camera.

So, is it possible?
 

espn

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#2
Less light right?

A ND filter should do the trick for you.
 

Vulpix0r

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#5
majere2sg said:
I think he wants to increase his shutter speed beyond his camera limit but I think it not possible.. A ND filter will further reduce his shutter speed.
I want to decrease it dude, not increase it. Let's say my A40 minimum is 1/3500 of a second, I want to further reduce it to 1/3700 (Slow light down), is it possible? Would the ND filter do the job?
 

Kei

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#6
No. You cannot exceed your digicam's limits.
 

#7
Vulpix0r said:
I want to decrease it dude, not increase it. Let's say my A40 minimum is 1/3500 of a second, I want to further reduce it to 1/3700 (Slow light down), is it possible? Would the ND filter do the job?
hi dude, don't you know that at 1/3700 sec, shutter speed is faster than 1/3500 ? You are trying to increase your shutter speed not reducing it..
With a ND, your camera at aperture priority will think there are less light, then it will tries to slow down your shutter speed, eg.. 1/3500 will become 1/1000.
 

Hein

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#8
Vulpix0r said:
I want to decrease it dude, not increase it. Let's say my A40 minimum is 1/3500 of a second, I want to further reduce it to 1/3700 (Slow light down), is it possible? Would the ND filter do the job?
Actually, a ND will allow less light to go thru ur camera lens, hence, you will be able to use a SLOWER shutter speed to take the shot. But I doubt you can use anything slower than the slowest shutter speed of your camera..

btw, going from 1/3500 to 1/3700 is actually INCREASING the shutter speed, not DECREASING it..... Why do you need to 1/3700 for???? that's very fast oredy, unless you taking pics of droplets or something..
 

Vulpix0r

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#9
Hein said:
Actually, a ND will allow less light to go thru ur camera lens, hence, you will be able to use a SLOWER shutter speed to take the shot. But I doubt you can use anything slower than the slowest shutter speed of your camera..

btw, going from 1/3500 to 1/3700 is actually INCREASING the shutter speed, not DECREASING it..... Why do you need to 1/3700 for???? that's very fast oredy, unless you taking pics of droplets or something..
Thanks for correcting me guys! :D The 1/3500 -> 1/3700 is just an example! My Canon A40 can lowest setting is 1/1500 for shutter speed, so wondering if got filter to emulate even lower shutter speed (Don't want too much light to go in).

Can someone explain to me how a ND filter works? I see +2 +4 variants of it...
 

#10
Vulpix0r said:
Thanks for correcting me guys! :D The 1/3500 -> 1/3700 is just an example! My Canon A40 can lowest setting is 1/1500 for shutter speed, so wondering if got filter to emulate even lower shutter speed (Don't want too much light to go in).

Can someone explain to me how a ND filter works? I see +2 +4 variants of it...
At manual mode with a fixed aperture size and shutter speed, adding a ND filter will allow less light to pass through, thus a darker image. using a +4 ND filter will restrict lesser light than a +2 ND filter.
 

Hein

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#11
Vulpix0r said:
Thanks for correcting me guys! :D The 1/3500 -> 1/3700 is just an example! My Canon A40 can lowest setting is 1/1500 for shutter speed, so wondering if got filter to emulate even lower shutter speed (Don't want too much light to go in).

Can someone explain to me how a ND filter works? I see +2 +4 variants of it...
If u use a ND filter, less light will go to the camera, and you may require a slower shutter speed for good exposure. If u want less light to go in, u may also consider using a smaller apperture than the 1 you are currently using.

What kind of shots are u taking????
 

Zerstorer

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Jul 8, 2002
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#12
Vulpix0r said:
Thanks for correcting me guys! :D The 1/3500 -> 1/3700 is just an example! My Canon A40 can lowest setting is 1/1500 for shutter speed, so wondering if got filter to emulate even lower shutter speed (Don't want too much light to go in).

Can someone explain to me how a ND filter works? I see +2 +4 variants of it...
Eh...lets get the terminology correct to avoid confusion.;)

Increase speed..what is speed? Speed is (some quantity over time) 1/T

Hence increase speed means reduce time. So increase speed means 1/500->1/1000.


You should have called it increase exposure time to reduce confusion.:)
 

jasonpgc

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#13
Lets say you need to take a picture at broad daylight.

You have choosen the 35mm focal length for your compositon.

You find that even with ISO 50, Aperture at f8(min for 35mm) and Shutter speed at 1/1500, your picture are still over exposed.

What you need is to reduce the exposure which can be achieved by,

1) Increasing Shutter Speed (Camera Setting already at Fastest)
2) Reducing Aperture Size (Camera Setting already at Slowest)
3) Reducing ISO Sensitivity (Camera Setting already at Lowest)
4) Reducing Light Source (ND Filter or Polarizer)
5) Waiting (For the Sun to hide behind a Cloud)
6) Shading (Use a canvas or umbrella to shade your subject if it is small)
 

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