A film slr b4 a dslr?


Status
Not open for further replies.

Falcon

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,768
0
0
37
#1
Hi,

I need some opinions on this issue. At the moment, I am saving up for a dslr and as a student, that would mean at least 3 yrs. So in the meantime, should I invest part of my saving in getting a film slr and get familarize with slr technology or should I save it up so as to realize my cam earlier. I am using an Oly digi cam at the moment.(oly c2100uz)

All comments/opinions very much welcome.

Thank you.
 

Larry

Senior Member
Apr 25, 2002
5,499
0
0
45
singapore
www.larryloh.com
#2
IMO, get a decent film SLR first - depending on your brand preferences, a mid-range SLR like the Nikon F90x can be gotten for well within $1K. that'll get you used to a SLR first, then you'll appreciate a D-SLR more, trust me. there are certain skillsets you also need to pick up which is different from a digicam.

also, bearing in mind that the SLR (digital or film) is not the end of it, you still have to consider lenses, accessories, filters, (new) tripod, remote cable, blah blah blah... at least by getting a film SLR first, you can gradually build up a decent collection of peripherals. then by the time you save up for a D-SLR, you'll won't really have to get everything all together.

just my 2 cents worth. :D
 

Falcon

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,768
0
0
37
#4
Originally posted by firefox13
IMO, get a decent film SLR first - depending on your brand preferences, a mid-range SLR like the Nikon F90x can be gotten for well within $1K. that'll get you used to a SLR first, then you'll appreciate a D-SLR more, trust me. there are certain skillsets you also need to pick up which is different from a digicam.

also, bearing in mind that the SLR (digital or film) is not the end of it, you still have to consider lenses, accessories, filters, (new) tripod, remote cable, blah blah blah... at least by getting a film SLR first, you can gradually build up a decent collection of peripherals. then by the time you save up for a D-SLR, you'll won't really have to get everything all together.

just my 2 cents worth. :D
That was what I had in mind too. But getting those stuff would mean that i will burn a large hole in my pocket first and my expected projection will be extended. :)
Would like to hear more opinions.
 

YSLee

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2002
2,326
1
38
Visit site
#6
Getting a film SLR now means you can start learning, and using film still has its advantages (namely good practices that you'll take to when you get your DSLR), and also, maybe the projection won't be that long.. maybe 4 years later you can get a decent digital SLR with more features at a cheaper price. :D
 

Darren

ClubSNAP Admin
Staff member
Jan 16, 2002
8,608
26
48
Melbourne
#7
The advice about getting a film SLR first and then upgrading later is sound advice.

Here is looking at it from another angle - if you invest in a decent film SLR now (together with the lenses and accessories), you can start building your system and start enjoying photography immediately. AND, with the prices of DSLRs dropping constantly, maybe your dream DSLR may be within reach sooner than your projected 3 yrs (even after investing in the film SLR). In the meantime, you would have already honed your skills on the film SLR.
 

Falcon

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,768
0
0
37
#9
Originally posted by Darren
The advice about getting a film SLR first and then upgrading later is sound advice.

Here is looking at it from another angle - if you invest in a decent film SLR now (together with the lenses and accessories), you can start building your system and start enjoying photography immediately. AND, with the prices of DSLRs dropping constantly, maybe your dream DSLR may be within reach sooner than your projected 3 yrs (even after investing in the film SLR). In the meantime, you would have already honed your skills on the film SLR.
Does it mean that I have to decide on a particular slr system and stay on with it since the accessories/lenses will only be compatible with the DSLR of that brand?
 

Larry

Senior Member
Apr 25, 2002
5,499
0
0
45
singapore
www.larryloh.com
#10
Originally posted by Darren
Here is looking at it from another angle - if you invest in a decent film SLR now (together with the lenses and accessories), you can start building your system and start enjoying photography immediately. AND, with the prices of DSLRs dropping constantly, maybe your dream DSLR may be within reach sooner than your projected 3 yrs (even after investing in the film SLR). In the meantime, you would have already honed your skills on the film SLR.
yet another angle to look at it from... with the popularity of D-SLRs and digicams nowsadays, film SLR prices are dropping like flies, esp in the 2nd hand market. instead of a brand new F60, you could probably pick up a used F80 or F90x for a bit more. that would be a decent model to start with...

just more food for thought...
 

Larry

Senior Member
Apr 25, 2002
5,499
0
0
45
singapore
www.larryloh.com
#11
Originally posted by Falcon
Does it mean that I have to decide on a particular slr system and stay on with it since the accessories/lenses will only be compatible with the DSLR of that brand?
that would be preferable of course, since you're on a budget. no point getting a Nikon now and deciding that you'll switch to Canon later, unless you have oodles of $$$ to burn. there are some common accessories like filters and tripods, but for things like lenses, flash units and cable releases, they're usually proprietory.
 

Falcon

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,768
0
0
37
#12
Originally posted by firefox13
that would be preferable of course, since you're on a budget. no point getting a Nikon now and deciding that you'll switch to Canon later, unless you have oodles of $$$ to burn. there are some common accessories like filters and tripods, but for things like lenses, flash units and cable releases, they're usually proprietory.
Definitely no $$ to burn. Already not enulf to spend. Now another headache... which body? :)
 

Snowcrash

New Member
Jan 18, 2002
1,537
0
0
Western SG
Visit site
#14
A method to use your limited budget between body/lens/film:-

get a decent body (will be backup once you get your DSLR), good len (should budget more for the lens than body as 'hopfully' can reuse on DSLR)

And set aside a new monthly expense for...

film and developing!!! (should be the most expensive compare to the body and len for the 3 years wait to DSLR)
 

Larry

Senior Member
Apr 25, 2002
5,499
0
0
45
singapore
www.larryloh.com
#15
Originally posted by Falcon
Definitely no $$ to burn. Already not enulf to spend. Now another headache... which body? :)
if you're opting for Nikon, i'd suggest F80 or F90x with grip. both decent systems to start off with (in fact i know quite a few full-time photogs who use F90x all the time), and both below $1k. i'll leave the Canon-ites to suggest their models. :D

Snowcrash is rite though, u should budget for film & devt every month, but if you shoot with some forethought and not bracket every single shot, should be safely below $100 every month.
 

chyeo

Senior Member
May 6, 2002
1,703
0
36
37
Woodlands
#16
I feel that you should get a decent film SLR first before buying a DSLR in future, bearing in mind what brand of DSLR you might be getting. Then invest in a film SLR that uses the same lens mount and flash, etc so that you don't have to buy another set of stuff for your DSLR in future.
 

chyeo

Senior Member
May 6, 2002
1,703
0
36
37
Woodlands
#17
If you are interested in getting F90X, you can check out The Camera Workshop @ Peninsula Hotel. I think they have a few in good condition (comes with the vertical grip MB10 too). Total cost less than $1000.
 

tomshen

Senior Member
Feb 20, 2002
3,644
0
36
Singapore
#18
Depends...

DSLR is $$$, but u learn faster with it (and actually cheaper in the long run). By any means, u still need a film body to shoot slides. Since you already have a digital camera, u may start from a film SLR first.

btw, buy canon, hahahahah
 

YSLee

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2002
2,326
1
38
Visit site
#19
Originally posted by tomshen

DSLR is $$$, but u learn faster with it (and actually cheaper in the long run).
That's fallacious, one can easily learn from a digital or film camera, it greatly depends on the person behind the camera. In fact I'd say that it's better to start learning with a film camera, it'll teach you how to get a shot and learn about judacious shooting rather than blindly firing away in the hope of getting a good shot.
 

zhoufang

New Member
Jan 19, 2002
230
0
0
35
Jurong
Visit site
#20
Originally posted by Falcon


Definitely no $$ to burn. Already not enulf to spend. Now another headache... which body? :)
I recommand a used EOS5.
one in excellent condition can be brought for $550 or less.
Beside the more advanced E-TTL flash system (only for external flash) and slower auto focus tracking, it perform well in every expect and is about as good as SLR body can get. will support all Canon lenses including the IS lenses.

If you find a EOS-50 at a bargin price (say <$400) it will also be good. even support E-TTL.

Still exp? consider a older EOS-10, 100, 620, 630. solid performance (all the modes/controls are there) from $100-300.

the money for EOS-30 can be saved for lens which will retain its value much better.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom