A beginner's Macro lens =P


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Apr 15, 2008
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#1
Hi everyone,

i'm buying my 1st Macro lens and honestly, i haven't much of a clue on what lens to buy.
I own a D50 and am considering a Tamron AF90mm F/2.8 Di Macro Lens 1:1 though.

Well, my choice mainly dependent on price, cos my budget's <800SGD =P

can anyone shed light on whether the Tamron's a good choice?
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
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#4
Many users can attest to this lens.
A Nikon 60mm micro will fit ur budget range as well

Ryan
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#5
Many users can attest to this lens.
A Nikon 60mm micro will fit ur budget range as well

Ryan
Depends on what you wanna take though....

food shots would be good with 60, but difficult with a 90...

and insect shots would be better with 90, less so with a 60... ;)
 

Feb 4, 2008
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#6
Tamron 180mm macro!!! One of the best around, great for shooting insects as i feel the canon 100mm macro need you to get v close to the bug. Might scare it away. I think you can buy for 800-850 2nd hand. Within your budget?
 

yannh

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Dec 10, 2007
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#9
I'm not sure 180mm is still consider a "beginner" lens. It's much more expensive, and more difficult to handle as well. Imagine you want to take dragonfly with it, how far you have to take from, and harder to handle lighting also. Just my 2 cents.
 

radiation

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Jan 30, 2005
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#10
hi there .

wel u might wana scroll in the BnS threads , u might find ur self a considerably competitive pricing if ur lookin fer a 2nd hand ones .

here's a lil tip

60mm - eg . still life , prooduct , portraiture

90mm ( quite common amongst us ) - eg. slightly bigger insects like butterfly n dragonfly .

180 / 200 mm - eg. tiny winy insects and this lens gives you more reach due to the focal
length .

hope this will help u a lil .

decide fer ya self b4 buying . common lens is the 90mm .
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#11
I'm not sure 180mm is still consider a "beginner" lens. It's much more expensive, and more difficult to handle as well. Imagine you want to take dragonfly with it, how far you have to take from, and harder to handle lighting also. Just my 2 cents.
I don't see how lighting would be harder with a 180mm macro..

anyway, the field of macro photography isn't that beginner friendly to begin with.. you'll need to get used to manual focusing, control of DoF, lighting.. working distance is something important to consider, whether you'll be shooting insects, food, still life etc..
 

Apr 15, 2008
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Singapore, east-ish
#12
the best is just go to shop to try out both lens... u will be clear of what u wanted... :)
good luck... :D
good point! Guess thats the best way to experience their 'feel'


I'm not sure 180mm is still consider a "beginner" lens.
hmm.... yr right. I better work with a tam 90mm to get the feel of macrophotography 1st.

and yea, J-Chan, i agree with you. thats why i'm only getting my 1st macro lens now, after 2 years of using telephoto and kit lens =P
 

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