50d inbuilt flash


Jun 7, 2011
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#1
The 50d has a 18-200 kit...but when i take the photos when there is bad lighting using the inbuilt flash there is a shadow on or before the subject...
to the bottom end of the photo... but when i use 50mm it seems fine..is this normal?
 

kei1309

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Apr 12, 2010
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#2
The 50d has a 18-200 kit...but when i take the photos when there is bad lighting using the inbuilt flash there is a shadow on or before the subject...
to the bottom end of the photo... but when i use 50mm it seems fine..is this normal?
there is a monster in the 18-200 lens....
 

TKL888

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Dec 20, 2009
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#3
The lenght of the 18-200 kit len is casting the shadows as the inbuilt flash is not high enough. Use a hot shoe mounted external flash would solved the problem.
 

HanHanSon

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Nov 14, 2010
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#4
It is because 18-200mm lens is longer and larger then 50mm one, which blocks the inbuilt flash lighting. Get a external flash will help!
 

Jul 16, 2010
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#6
I think it's the hood. I get that when I used my 18-200 with hood on and using built-in flash.
 

SkyStrike

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#7
I believe it's the length of the lens that cast that shadow. My 55-250 can cast the shadow (>200mm) when I was playing with raynox + inbuilt flash.
 

kei1309

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#8
I think it's the hood. I get that when I used my 18-200 with hood on and using built-in flash.
not only the hood. the length of the lens plays a part. because of the height to the pop-up flash, it's not elevated high enough to cast the light over the lens. therefore, the lens gets in the way of the light from the flash, and casts a shadow on the image.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#9
Point the camera to something, don't look through the viewfinder but rather look 'from above'. You'll see how the tiny flash with the AF assist beam illuminates the lens and hood, casting a shadow on the subject.
 

rhino123

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#10
Agreed with the rest of the bros who posted here. Get an external flash, it will solve your problem.
 

blueskye168

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Aug 28, 2006
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#11
Well, that's why/how an external flash comes into play...as it's one of an important "item/gear" to include into a/your 'System'...:thumbsup:
Worth getting it for very sure:heart:it:bsmilie::bsmilie:...;)
 

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edutilos-

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Dec 28, 2010
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#12
1) The shadow is that of the lens. It is more than LENGTH contributing to the shadow; FOCAL LENGTH or FIELD OF VIEW would play a part (suspect that's the reason here, rather than length), as would the diameter of the lens and the height of the built-in flash above the lens barrel (relative to each other). I would find it very hard to produce a shadow with a long, long, long 600mm and using a super powerful torch mounted where the flash is, for example (assuming the beam of light is not obstructed by lens barrel).

2) An external flash is one solution, because it raises the light source significantly higher above the lens barrel and thus would avoid this problem. There are other possible solutions, but they tend to be fiddly. Alternatively, just don't shoot WA lor.
 

Sep 23, 2005
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#13
there is a monster in the 18-200 lens....
1st to reply and yet... :bigeyes: Why must there be a nuisance answer to each genuine question that led to crap-ful replies resulting in locked thread?
 

kei1309

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Apr 12, 2010
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#14
1st to reply and yet... :bigeyes: Why must there be a nuisance answer to each genuine question that led to crap-ful replies resulting in locked thread?
it's called "+1 to my post count". but anyways, i've answered TS' question. have you answered anything? or are you just here to complain and make noise? tsk tsk
 

bonrya

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Dec 16, 2010
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#15
Joey Jacob Koh said:
The 50d has a 18-200 kit...but when i take the photos when there is bad lighting using the inbuilt flash there is a shadow on or before the subject...
to the bottom end of the photo... but when i use 50mm it seems fine..is this normal?
It's normal. If you use a UWA lens with onboard flash you'll get this too.

Time to BBB an external flash! :bsmilie:
 

SkyStrike

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#16
It's normal. If you use a UWA lens with onboard flash you'll get this too.

Time to BBB an external flash! :bsmilie:
Actually, the free and easy way out is to turn the camera upside down and shoot. That way, the shadow cast by the flash will be cast on the ceiling (hopefully it's not in the frame). It's inconvenient, but it does solve the problem.
 

Sep 23, 2005
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#17
it's called "+1 to my post count". but anyways, i've answered TS' question. have you answered anything? or are you just here to complain and make noise? tsk tsk
Yeah right, only after others contributed and after your "smart" answer. Haaa, no surprise to your 1k + post counts within a year. Great job, keep it up. Tch Tch Tch :angel:
 

bonrya

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Dec 16, 2010
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#18
SkyStrike said:
Actually, the free and easy way out is to turn the camera upside down and shoot. That way, the shadow cast by the flash will be cast on the ceiling (hopefully it's not in the frame). It's inconvenient, but it does solve the problem.
No leh. The shadow will still be there... Except it'll be cast on the face instead. Unless you can tilt the inboard flash to face the ceiling or via the infinity bounce technique... :bsmilie:
 

bonrya

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#19
wakaowalao said:
Yeah right, only after others contributed and after your "smart" answer. Haaa, no surprise to your 1k + post counts within a year. Great job, keep it up. Tch Tch Tch :angel:
Did keiko break your heart too? :bsmilie:
 

rhino123

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Sep 1, 2006
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#20
Aiyo, all so complicated. The simplest way is to tie a piece of white card to your inbuilt flast and that will direct your flash up or in any direction you want (depending on the card's location and the exit point for the flash). Simple and the white card can be had for a few cents.

Or something as seen,





Well... you get the idea.
 

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