35mm lens for portrait shots?


Nov 10, 2010
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#1
Hi. Im considering getting a lens with F1.8 aperture for portrait shots, im considering getting a Nikon DX 35mm F/1.8G.
Would you reccommend this lens for portrait shots? I still think the focal length is abit too short though. If you have a similar prime lens, please advice. Cheers.
 

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night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#2
there is no zoom for a PRIME LENS.

it's fine for portaiture, though do note that you shouldn't shoot too close (perhaps half body) with this lens, to avoid distortion of various body parts. e.g. if you shoot too close to the face with a 35mm (i.e. a head shot), you would probably have the person not looking like themselves, with nose bigger, or cheek bigger than real life proportions, which can be bad.
 

Jul 11, 2009
1,565
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The Outer Limits
#3
Hi SAMUELS,

Yes i have the Nikon AF-S DX 35mm f1.8 G lens on my D300 for portrait shoot... Very sharp images. I also use 50mm f1.8 D lens for portrait shoot too. Now saving up to get the 85mm f1.8 lens.

If you want to 'zoom' then use your legs for the focal length you want.

My humble photos shots of the beautiful ang-mo models @ http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=769167
 

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Nov 10, 2010
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#5
Hi SAMUELS,

Yes i have the Nikon AF-S DX 35mm f1.8 G lens on my D300 for portrait shoot... Very sharp images. I also use 50mm f1.8 D lens for portrait shoot too.

If you want to 'zoom' then use your legs for the focal length you want.
Is it very inconvenient to use this lens? All the walking back and forth due to fixed focus? But the aperture is so good.
 

coolthought

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2008
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#6
check with daredevil123. Fantastic portraits from him with the 35mm prime.
 

PaulKami

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Sep 9, 2007
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#7
Are you talking about the DX 35mm F1.8? It's good, however, you've gotta know that the focus tend to be soft at the edge of the lens than the middle (the middle has the sharpness which considered to be one of the sharpest lens for DX camera - At least from the data from Dpreview).
 

Jul 11, 2009
1,565
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The Outer Limits
#8
Is it very inconvenient to use this lens? All the walking back and forth due to fixed focus? But the aperture is so good.
That you will have to ask yourself what you really wants...

If you don't want to walk back and forth too much, then maybe you'll have to get an expensive AF-S 17-55mm f2.8 lens... it's also sharp but big and heavy.

Maybe you borrow the lens from any camera loan shops to shoot and find out which lenses you'll like/use before you go and buy.
 

Smiles88

New Member
Jun 14, 2010
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#9
Is it very inconvenient to use this lens? All the walking back and forth due to fixed focus? But the aperture is so good.
Few steps only... Not like running a 2.4km run mah. It's worth it if you know how to ultilise it to its best. :)

Are you talking about the DX 35mm F1.8? It's good, however, you've gotta know that the focus tend to be soft at the edge of the lens than the middle (the middle has the sharpness which considered to be one of the sharpest lens for DX camera - At least from the data from Dpreview).
It's still best to try it out for yourself. Even if the edges are indeed noticably softer, I believe tt for many, cropping is a part of the PP?
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#10
On a DX:
24mm equates to around 35mm FOV. It is a good wide prime focal length to get some dynamic look in portraits.
35mm equates to around 50mm FOV. It is a good focal length for full body to half body shots.
50mm equates to around 75mm FOV. It is a good focal length for half body to head&shoulders shots.
85mm equates to around 125mm FOV. It is a good focal length for head&shoulders and head shots.

And the 35/1.8 is fast attaining cult status, because of one trait not advertised by Nikon.... It can even be used on a FX body shooting in FX mode. It becomes a real 35mm wide prime on FX mode with very slight blur vignetting but still very much usable. ;) In fact the vignetting can add some artistic feel in portraits.

Sharper, Faster focusing and Cheaper than the AF-D 35mm/2. Many folks overseas are dumping the 35/2 to get the 35/1.8 (even FX users)... funny thing is I see people here in SG dumping the 35/1.8 to get the 35/2 saying how it is good to own a FX lens for upgrade progression... LOL... :bsmilie: But that will change... many people will soon be dumping both 35mm lenses to get the 35/1.4G.
 

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ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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rainy Singapore
#11
Hi. Im considering getting a lens with F1.8 aperture for portrait shots, im considering getting a Nikon DX 35mm F/1.8G.
Would you reccommend this lens for portrait shots? I still think the focal length is abit too short though. If you have a similar prime lens, please advice. Cheers.
I tend to use it for more casual shots rather than serious portraits :)
Because it's so small, I can often pair it with a small ext flash and carry it around easily... I call it my 'ninja setup' :bsmilie:

focal length feels suitable (to me) for indoor spaces. Upper body shots from about 2m away look ok to me, distortion-wise.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,660
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lil red dot
#12
Are you talking about the DX 35mm F1.8? It's good, however, you've gotta know that the focus tend to be soft at the edge of the lens than the middle (the middle has the sharpness which considered to be one of the sharpest lens for DX camera - At least from the data from Dpreview).
I don't find the 35/1.8 soft at the borders. I find them acceptably good at the border wide open compared to many primes out there.
 

brapodam

New Member
Jun 12, 2009
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#16
Different lenses achieve different looks, and any focal length can be used for portraits. Heck, nobody's stopping you from standing 200m away from your model and use a 1000 mm lens to shoot them. Some people even use fisheyes for portraits with very interesting results.
 

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