35mm Format = 24mm x 36mm or ...


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Ibanez

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Jan 4, 2010
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Hullo, everybody,

I am from the analog days and have this *question* arising from my pre-occupation with the discontinued Kodachrome 135 format from of old. Never did got an answer to this question, really. Now that the Internet is generoysly available and knowledgeable, here goes.

Majority of DSLRs use the APS-C format which is based on the (reduced) 35mm format. The professional models uses full frame which is equal to the 35mm format. 35mm format got its root from 70mm film format (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film).

How do you explain the dimension of 24mm by 36mm full frame (whether digital or analog) when the label was always 35mm? I doubt the 36 refers to the 35 exposures at that time.

Note: In my search to have a completely clear understanding of the Nikon's DX/FX format against that offered by Canon, I got driven back to this nagging question.
 

An drew

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May 27, 2005
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#2
Hullo, everybody,

I am from the analog days and have this *question* arising from my pre-occupation with the discontinued Kodachrome 135 format from of old. Never did got an answer to this question, really. Now that the Internet is generoysly available and knowledgeable, here goes.

Majority of DSLRs use the APS-C format which is based on the (reduced) 35mm format. The professional models uses full frame which is equal to the 35mm format. 35mm format got its root from 70mm film format (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film).

How do you explain the dimension of 24mm by 36mm full frame (whether digital or analog) when the label was always 35mm? I doubt the 36 refers to the 35 exposures at that time.

Note: In my search to have a completely clear understanding of the Nikon's DX/FX format against that offered by Canon, I got driven back to this nagging question.
Your link explains very well why it is called 35mm, the width of the actual film used is 35mm. The portion of the film used to capture the image is 24 by 36mm which is the dimension retained for digital sensors.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#3
just take a ruler to measure the film frame size, is 23.5mm by 35mm.

and for 35mm film, the film is 35mm wide,

for 70mm film, the film is 70mm wide.

and for the name 135, is just a article code name for this particular size of film
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#4
I believe 35mm refered to the entire width of the film including the perforations/sprockets, whereas the dimension somehow is close to the Golden Ratio, which supposedly creates a mathematically pleasing rectangle..
 

bengchiat

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Mar 14, 2008
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#5
if measure the film widthwise, its 35mm.
 

bengchiat

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Mar 14, 2008
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#6
slow in keying n already there r ans :)
cheers CSers.
 

Xtol19

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Dec 13, 2008
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#7
The numbers come from the product codes, eg 135, 110, 120, 220 film. Obviously, 120 film is not 120 mm wide, neither is 220 film 220 mm wide.

Hullo, everybody,

I am from the analog days and have this *question* arising from my pre-occupation with the discontinued Kodachrome 135 format from of old. Never did got an answer to this question, really. Now that the Internet is generoysly available and knowledgeable, here goes.

Majority of DSLRs use the APS-C format which is based on the (reduced) 35mm format. The professional models uses full frame which is equal to the 35mm format. 35mm format got its root from 70mm film format (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film).

How do you explain the dimension of 24mm by 36mm full frame (whether digital or analog) when the label was always 35mm? I doubt the 36 refers to the 35 exposures at that time.

Note: In my search to have a completely clear understanding of the Nikon's DX/FX format against that offered by Canon, I got driven back to this nagging question.
 

Ibanez

New Member
Jan 4, 2010
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#8
So upon what reference was 135 derived from. Fuji also uses this "135" in their products.

just take a ruler to measure the film frame size, is 23.5mm by 35mm.

and for 35mm film, the film is 35mm wide,

for 70mm film, the film is 70mm wide.

and for the name 135, is just a article code name for this particular size of film
 

cabbySHE

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Dec 5, 2008
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#9
this queation is similar to one question which i'd always asked and haven't got a convincing answer..( an off topic subject ).why all the planets are round ? is there a square one ?
note : planets, not meteor or others.
 

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Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#10
this queation is similar to one question which i'd always asked and haven't got a convincing answer..( an off topic subject ).why all the planets are round ? is there a square one ?
note : planets, not meteor or others.
For 'Square Planets' you might want to google about "Borg" ;) - although this is not a real planet. All the rest of matter has to follow gravity ...
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#11
Even more OT, its all gotta do with General Relativity.. ;)
 

Jul 29, 2009
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#12
haha, coz of centripetal force. That's why planet is round.
 

An drew

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May 27, 2005
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#13
haha, coz of centripetal force. That's why planet is round.
So is it gravity or centripetal force? The planet has mass so there is gravity. If the planet rotates then there is also some centripetal force but this force would be in the opposite direction and the shape would be more cylindrical along the axis and not spherical. But the resultant shape would be from the combination of all the forces.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_are_planets_round
 

cabbySHE

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Dec 5, 2008
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#14
I'll use PRS to jam with Ibanez.
 

Ansel

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Apr 30, 2003
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#17
So upon what reference was 135 derived from. Fuji also uses this "135" in their products.
Same reason why HP copy paper got A4 size and Xerox copy paper also got A4 size.

the designations 135, 120, 220, etc are like industry product codes and has got nothing to do with their physical dimensions. the "35" in 135 was a mere coincidence.
 

agws1970

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Sep 9, 2002
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#18
Hullo, everybody,

I am from the analog days and have this *question* arising from my pre-occupation with the discontinued Kodachrome 135 format from of old. Never did got an answer to this question, really. Now that the Internet is generoysly available and knowledgeable, here goes.

Majority of DSLRs use the APS-C format which is based on the (reduced) 35mm format. The professional models uses full frame which is equal to the 35mm format. 35mm format got its root from 70mm film format (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film).

How do you explain the dimension of 24mm by 36mm full frame (whether digital or analog) when the label was always 35mm? I doubt the 36 refers to the 35 exposures at that time.

Note: In my search to have a completely clear understanding of the Nikon's DX/FX format against that offered by Canon, I got driven back to this nagging question.
Google is your best friend. Google and this is your first hit.

http://www.nwmangum.com/Kodak/FilmHist.html

Haiz.
 

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