3 Tips for Bringing Camera for Winter Holidays


Oct 4, 2007
798
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Woodlands
www.flickr.com
#1
Hello everyone, while searching the forums, i found many people asking about how to take care of their cameras during winter holidays, extreme cold etc. I was one of them.

So after googling, i found a few websites that advise the same things, so I though I'd share with all newbies here, or anyone who is interested.

1. Keep Camera Warm
in the cold, your battery tends to die faster. so most websites recommend keeping a spare or two inside your coat pocket, or anywhere near your body, to keep it warm. when the battery in your camera "dies", it doesnt really die per se, but looses some of its charge. just swap the "dead" battery with a warm one, and when tat dies, insert the previous battery which should have regained some of its charge.

Some Csers have advised to stick those "instant heating pads" on the battery grip to keep the camera and battery warm. it serves to keep your hands warm too!

2. Condensation
to help combat condensation, wrap your camera in a zip lock bag when moving from cold to warm place. this will prevent condensation from forming on the camera and instead form on the plastic bag.

If condensation occurs, remove the memory card and battery from their compartments and keep the doors open until everything dries. Remove the lens cap too.

3. Breathing on the lens
DO NOT BREATH ON OUR LENS. this may cause water droplets from our saliva to freeze on the lens! this may work here in SG, but not in cold places. wipe off dust or any moisture immediately with a cloth.

4. Moving from cold to warm place
When bringing the back camera inside, give it time to adjust to the room temperature. First put the camera in an unheated room for about a half hour before bringing it into a warm area. Also place it inside a camera bag to help minimize condensation.

Don’t take the camera out into the cold again until the condensation is gone because the moisture may freeze causing permanent damage.

5. Just Enjoy shooting
one last tip. ENJOY THE HOLIDAY and dont worry so much about the weather. if DSLRs were so fragile, how do our counterparts in cold climates cope? Not everyone uses a weathersealed camera rite?

okay thats all I have. here are some of the links that i used for this post.

http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-care/varying-weather/cold-weather/
http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/12476.aspx
http://www.urban-photography-art.com/camera-care.html
http://www.adorama.com/alc/article/8151

Enjoy!

-EDIT-

keep your hands well moisturized to avoid getting zapped by static electricity when you pick up your cam or touch anything metallic ....... cold weather usually means extremely dry conditions
 

Last edited:
Oct 4, 2007
798
0
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Woodlands
www.flickr.com
#4
thanks. i realised that alot of people ask this question, and a simple google search would help answer their queries.

but yeah, instead of giving them the smartass answer of "go search" i think this would be more helpful. :)
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
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www.pbase.com
#5
suggest this to be stickied, nice summary of anything anyone, even the most kia-see traveller might want to take note of.

i think #2 and #4 are the same thing.. and #3, well, i really don't think it is common.

so it is really still 3 tips; in summary:

1) careful of condensation, as to how it happens, use your brain.

2) keep your camera warm as battery life might decrease

3) enjoy your holiday, really the most important.

unfortunately, after a while, ts, you might realise, even with this thread, it doesn't matter. people will still ask, because that is the way of the modern lazy man. just ask because create new thread is very fun to do!
 

ed9119

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 11, 2002
11,013
38
48
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Singapore
www.walkeast.com
#6
keep your hands well moisturized to avoid getting zapped by static electricity when you pick up your cam or touch anything metallic ....... cold weather usually means extremely dry conditions
 

May 5, 2005
457
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#7
This sure comes in useful as I'm just about to go Jiuzhaigou next week. Heard it's snowing there! Thanks Guys for the tips :)
 

petetherock

Senior Member
Oct 9, 2006
1,658
4
38
#8
IMO the right gloves are useful.

Not too bulky, but enough protection against the cold:

Try these - http://www.rei.com/product/766531 USD 30



Useful for hikes too.

The Manzella Silkweight WindStopper gloves provide just the right mix of windproof warmth, water resistance and breathability for highly aerobic activities.

  • WindStopper® N2S Silkweight 3-layer laminate is a breathable, windproof membrane sandwiched between polyester and a moisture-wicking knit face
  • As the body heats up, moisture is forced out through the membrane as vapor, so you stay comfortable
  • Palms and fingertips feature gripper material for sensitivity and dexterity
  • Clips join gloves together when not in use
  • Hand wash in cold water; lay flat to dry
 

Jul 11, 2005
635
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#10
Condensation is not usually a problem in cold climates because the air is very dry. With humidity low, there is little condensation even if you go from a very cold outdoors to a warm room. I've just come back from Switzerland & it was -15 degrees on Klein Matterhorn. The battery life was affected somewhat, but no problems taking a couple of hundred shots. Just charge your battery fully the night before.

The only time I had condensation problems was in Zurich Zoo where there is a tropical rainforest enclosure. In that enclosure humidity is kept high & the lens fogged up immediately & severely once I walked into the enclosure. However when I left the enclosure condensation cleared very quickly.

With some guided tours, you might not have time to put you camera in an unheated room for 30mins. You probably also don't want to be fumbling about with plastic bags & such. Importantly is to keep yourself warm so that you can function best to take photos & to enjoy your holidays.
 

Nov 5, 2009
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#11
This is a very interesting find indeed. I will have to check it out when I get the time though. Thanks for the nice tips.

________________________
apartments for rent
 

Oct 4, 2007
798
0
0
Woodlands
www.flickr.com
#12
no problemo. can this be stickied? hehe (self praise here) but i think this will be really helpful to prevent people from asking this same question all the time.
 

sk8

New Member
Sep 7, 2005
29
0
0
#13
Condensation is not usually a problem in cold climates because the air is very dry. With humidity low, there is little condensation even if you go from a very cold outdoors to a warm room.
Hi, it depends on how the room is heated. If it is from open flame heating, the air will be moist. If there are heaps of people or cooking present, these will also contribute to the damp air.

Cheers.
 

maestrokk

New Member
Jun 3, 2008
56
0
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Jurong, Singapore
#14
Thanks man, Guessed i am about to be one of those "lazy" people as i have typed my question in a new thread form, but managed to think straight and search "cold weather" before posting. :p

Good info!
 

petetherock

Senior Member
Oct 9, 2006
1,658
4
38
#15
no problemo. can this be stickied? hehe (self praise here) but i think this will be really helpful to prevent people from asking this same question all the time.
Unfortunately there are too many threads of such useful info bro...
Almost ALL the threads here deserve such status, except the repeat questions...
There are still lazy folks about sometimes.

Cheers
 

petetherock

Senior Member
Oct 9, 2006
1,658
4
38
#16
Ok, instead of multiple replies in many thread, will respond to the other threads Here so it is easier to find in future.

- skiing - (actually I think it was answered before)

EDIT - I was right!
The previous thread: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=561815&highlight=skiing

If you are a pro and seldom fall, then you may wish to consider bringing all that gear including a DSLR. What is a pro?

Someone who has clocked more than 100 hours and is capable of doing BLACK slopes with ease. If you are still falling regularly, or do not know what is a Black slope, then you are not a proficient skier yet :)

FYI I have clocked weeks on the slopes but I refrain from doing beyond what I am comfortable with.

I have also learnt to ski light...

Everyone falls, and so you need to be able to carry that pack and ski, and unless you are used to it, it will unsettle your weight.

If you fall on your pack and crushe the lens... well...

And please DO NOT stop in the middle of the slope!!! If you are on the slope, there could be a lot of people behind you going at high speeds and they will knock into you.

It is not only annoying but dangerous to have people taking out their cameras on such slopes.

Do it on the bunny slopes or before you ski.

If you take it out on a ski lift, make sure you wear your strap and are able to keep it before getting off the ski. Otherwise you will need all your hands to get off and you Will Fall.

Hence a pocket camera is more suitable unless you don't ski. Combining the two for a Singaporean who is not a regular on the slopes is tough.

Cheers
 

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petetherock

Senior Member
Oct 9, 2006
1,658
4
38
#17
It is important to keep warm and yet not look like a polar bear...

I wore this to - 22 C conditions, and with a sweater (thermaplus pro) plus a good merino wool inner layer, it was more than enough.

Cloudveil Down Patrol Jacket..

It has an inner slot for a water pack in the back. Enough pockets for your camera and other stuff.




http://www.cloudveil.com/mens/jackets/down/down+patrol+jacket--6039/

Product Information:

  • Stuffed with 650-fill 90/10 down, Cloudveil's puffiest parka stays toasty even when the mercury dips into the double-digit minus range.
  • Dual direction YKK® Vislon CF zipper.
  • Removable zip-off hood.
  • Adjustable volume hood.
  • Zippered hidden double entry chest pocket.
  • Zippered hand warmer pockets.
  • Venting pit zips with mesh panel.
  • Laminated cuff tabs.
  • Electronics cord loop.
  • Internal zippered mesh goggle pocket.
  • Internal electronics compatible pocket.
  • Removable powder skirt.
  • Dual adjustable hem drawcord with excess cord holder tab.
  • Laminated draft flap with rollover chin saver.
  • Microfleece wrist cuffs.
  • WINDSTOPPER® shell:
  • 2-layer construction.
  • 100% Polyester 50d face with Gore WINDSTOPPER® laminate.
  • Exceptional breathablity and highly water resistant, this fabric provides the ultimate wind and water protection.
  • 85 g/m2.
  • 80/20 wash DWR.
  • Taffeta lining:
  • At 65g/m2 this is a very light weight, air permeable taffeta.
  • 100% 50d nylon.
 

walk13

New Member
Aug 23, 2009
5
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0
#18
just to check, in cold weather like -2. can we keep our camera outside? or must be hurry keep it in the bag after we shot?

1. can we put a heat pack inside the bag ?
2. can we put silica gel inside the bag?
3. what will be the damage to the lens and rubber?
 

two200

New Member
Nov 19, 2004
787
0
0
Eunos
galleria2200.blogspot.com
#19
just to check, in cold weather like -2. can we keep our camera outside? or must be hurry keep it in the bag after we shot?

1. can we put a heat pack inside the bag ?
2. can we put silica gel inside the bag?
3. what will be the damage to the lens and rubber?
If you wear specs you will understand the dynamincs. If the lens is too cold, when indoors, the moister in the air will condense on the lens. Hence, from experience, altho not quite -2, once photograph taken, quickly put under cold wear and zip up. This way, the lens won't be cold enough to condense any moisture in the room.

1. did not use heat pack
2. I suppose can but no use cos, the silica will loose absorbing ability in no time
3. :dunno:
 

walk13

New Member
Aug 23, 2009
5
0
0
#20
thanks two200...

though hor??? what a headache to bring it out.. haiz....
 

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