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Thread: Portrait taking...

  1. #1

    Default Portrait taking...

    hi...

    can someone share how to take a picture of a portrait and the person look slim...be it on the face or whole body?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    after the photo taken, you can use liquify to tidy up the less slim parts.
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  3. #3

    Default

    I believe most people who wants slim body in photos is to tilt their body to an angle so that they look thin...

    Else.. PS use liquify lorh....

  4. #4
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    there are many ways to make a person looks slim,

    start with using correct focal length lens
    pay attention on the suitable wardrobe,
    than carefully mold your subject with lighting,
    follow by the pose to enhance body part yous want to show or hide the parts you don't want show,
    plus use of props creativity,

    that should help

    but if done everything and still failed,
    try photoshop
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Anson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    but if done everything and still failed,
    try photoshop
    Really wonder in the old days of film, where there is no photoshop (eg: liquify), what to they do if "if done everything and still failed", beside shooting again?

  6. #6
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Really wonder in the old days of film, where there is no photoshop (eg: liquify), what to they do if "if done everything and still failed", beside shooting again?
    that is why the old school photographers are paying so much attention before clicking the shutter release.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Really wonder in the old days of film, where there is no photoshop (eg: liquify), what to they do if "if done everything and still failed", beside shooting again?
    Another trick was to stretch the image upwards... Makes you look slimmer but also more "code head".

    Plus, in the "old days" a little bit of chubb was considered sexy, this is before the current trend of "toothpick" models...
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by FrogmanTan View Post
    hi...

    can someone share how to take a picture of a portrait and the person look slim...be it on the face or whole body?
    im afraid there's no straight forward answer to this...

    each model is different, and they have features they like to flaunt and hide.
    id suggest try experimenting with the model with different poses, and from many angles.

    when you are comfortable playing with the lighting (especially the artificial light) ~ it'll give you more options.
    Lighting can also tremendously change the way the subject looks.

    all the best
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  9. #9

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    thanks everyone...

    anyway, where to get liquify?

  10. #10
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrogmanTan
    thanks everyone...

    anyway, where to get liquify?
    Is a filter inside photoshop software.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    bouce lights off ceiling, shadows under the chin will make person look slimmer....

  12. #12
    Deregistered shaoken's Avatar
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    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by farbird View Post
    bouce lights off ceiling, shadows under the chin will make person look slimmer....
    Haha! Nice one..

  13. #13

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Use Short lighting when shooting.

  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson

    Really wonder in the old days of film, where there is no photoshop (eg: liquify), what to they do if "if done everything and still failed", beside shooting again?
    Go exercise till u are slimmer
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  15. #15

    Default

    Can try the following
    1. Ask model to stabd facing you
    2. Ask model to put both hands on waist.
    3. Ask model to twist waist to abt 45degrees
    4. Then you move to face model's face
    5. Take photo of model

  16. #16

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    Go exercise till u are slimmer
    That seems to be the wisest choice. kekeke..
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  17. #17

    Default Re: Portrait taking...

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Really wonder in the old days of film, where there is no photoshop (eg: liquify), what to they do if "if done everything and still failed", beside shooting again?
    In the old days, Portraits are almost always taken in a studio where lighting are well controlled and picture taken on large format sheet films and in Black & White. Generally a portrait would take a couple of weeks to be ready for viewing as after developing the film, the photographer would place these films (negatives) on a small light table and go about slowly to touch up these negatives one at a time. Since the negatives are in B&W, it's easier for him to touch up as he is only playing with one colour. Just shades of black. He can always trim off any unwanted areas with this method. Those days, a good touch up photographers can really get very good business. My uncle used to own such a studio and I used to, as a little boy watched him work in the darken room with his little brushes and black ink plus a little very sharp pointed blade which he used to remove some of the black masking on specific areas of the negatives. That was Art at work. Photoshop makes such work much, much easier for those who master the software.

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