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Thread: ND filter vs High Speed Sync

  1. #1

    Default ND filter vs High Speed Sync

    Not sure if this has been posted before. Seems like a good read.

    What are your thoughts?

    http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/07/1...er-with-flash/

  2. #2

    Default Re: ND filter vs High Speed Sync

    Yes good reading material

    Quote Originally Posted by torque6 View Post
    Not sure if this has been posted before. Seems like a good read.

    What are your thoughts?

    http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/07/1...er-with-flash/
    D3S|N70-200|N24-70|N24-85|N50f1.4|N35f2|SB800|SB900|Yashica GS|S95
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  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Default

    Vari-ND starting looks good now to me.
    Equipment: D800|D700|11-16|28-75|105 Micro VR|50 F1.4G|85 F1.8G
    Through the Lens of Cowseye

  4. #4

    Default

    DH wrote an artical about nd filters as well

  5. #5
    Member tsumetiv's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter vs High Speed Sync

    Thanks for sharing! The article is very insightful and I would like to try this out personally to see how varied my shots will turn out

  6. #6
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter vs High Speed Sync

    Good read, though essentially if you have a very clear concept of exposure this is merely something leading from there.

  7. #7
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter vs High Speed Sync

    Using ND filter is one possible way, but you'll need to check the shutter speed regularly and not letting it dip below the 1/focal length rule of thumb. And the limitation is, since the usual max sync speed is 1/250s, the shutter speed margin becomes rather narrow. This is especially true when you're shooting portraiture at, say the 200mm end of a 70-200 lens, which you only have 1/200-1/250s to work with. To overcome that, a monopod can be used to help in stability. Using HSS would not have this issue but you'll need to watch the shooting distance, since the smaller aperture you use, the closer the flash need to be to the subject.

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