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Thread: Fix aliasing produced by the sensor?

  1. #1
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    Question Fix aliasing produced by the sensor?

    I have the following image taken on Nikon D70:

    http://www.pbase.com/johnyu/image/34513272/original

    The poles in the vineyard show aliasing: alternate poles haves alternate brightness. If zoom at 200%, each individual pole also exhibits aliasing: pixels have alternate brightness vertically.

    The former problem shows up in 10x15 Fuji Frontier print. And the latter problem prevents me from applying agressive USM.

    Are there good techniques to cure aliasing like these?

  2. #2
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    Before the fact, you can try taking the picture from a slightly different position.

    After the fact, can try

    Nikon Capture - colour moire reduction
    Bibble - has a similar feature
    Curve Therapy - from Rawmagick

  3. #3
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    Just looked at your image - sorry, no offense, but you must be pretty picky with your photos - I can't spot any real problem with it.

    Side note - digital is like a double edged sword for photography; people are taking a lot of great pictures and learning faster, but I think a lot of us (myself included) sometimes get too caught up in the technical flaws without appreciating the image (can't see the forest for the trees)

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    Quote Originally Posted by gooseberry
    Before the fact, you can try taking the picture from a slightly different position.

    After the fact, can try

    Nikon Capture - colour moire reduction
    Bibble - has a similar feature
    Curve Therapy - from Rawmagick
    Thanks, gooseberry. I'll give NC a try.
    Btw, apart from these demoire s/w, is there any PS technique I can apply?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnyu
    Thanks, gooseberry. I'll give NC a try.
    Btw, apart from these demoire s/w, is there any PS technique I can apply?
    No worries, you're welcome.

    Not sure about PS, but I have read somewhere that there is a PS technique - try doing a search for it at dpreview.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gooseberry
    Just looked at your image - sorry, no offense, but you must be pretty picky with your photos - I can't spot any real problem with it.

    Side note - digital is like a double edged sword for photography; people are taking a lot of great pictures and learning faster, but I think a lot of us (myself included) sometimes get too caught up in the technical flaws without appreciating the image (can't see the forest for the trees)
    No offense is taken.

    The problem shows up in the right-hand-side of the frame, in the close vineyard. It's a bit subtle in the original resolution. But I did a fuji frontier 10x15 print which required a bit of upsampling (with PS bicubic smooth). And the problem becomes more visible.

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