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Thread: Do It Yourself - Lens repair

  1. #1
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    Default Do It Yourself - Lens repair


  2. #2
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    Heh! Extreme repairs!

  3. #3
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    Ha ha you've got me going there for a moment. Totally Extreme!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member GENO's Avatar
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    anyone try before? hee hee
    Take both its legs down first, then cuts its tail, next is shoot between its eyes:devil:

  5. #5
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    Default Have exactly the same lens...and its getting yellow

    Hiee...

    Been there before....(website).....

    THe Super Takumar yellowing has its own use tooo.......
    This lens on its own is useful for black and white photography......
    No need to put a yellow filter for contrast.....kekekeke

    rgds,
    sh

  6. #6
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    Aiya...dun have such a big hammer to repair my lens
    Dreaming... 14mm f2.8, 16-35 f2.8 mkII, 85 f1.2 mkII

  7. #7
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    Wow! That's call repair????

  8. #8
    Senior Member glennyong's Avatar
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    tats a very very very............ erm..... "fun" way of repairing ?? the author also forgot to include goggles while operating the service procedure...

    he might wanna wear some goggle to prevent chips of shattered glass from flying into his eyeballs.. hahaha....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by glennyong
    tats a very very very............ erm..... "fun" way of repairing ?? the author also forgot to include goggles while operating the service procedure...

    he might wanna wear some goggle to prevent chips of shattered glass from flying into his eyeballs.. hahaha....
    I know Brian. Had coffee with his friend Bob when he was in-town. Nice guy. Brian wrote up that page before we discovered that there IS a legitimate cure, which I've tried and it works.

    Simply, go to Sim Lim and buy a UV lamp. These give out UV-B, and are used for reading watermarks, sun-tanning or party effects. Wrap your lens in alum foil (lenscap off) with only rear-element end exposed and facing the lamp ... about 5-10cm away from tube. After about 2-3 weeks, the yellowing will fade and sometimes disappear. Repeat treatment every 30years if yellowing returns. Keep area well ventilated as not to get too warm ... because that's bad for the compound lens element, which may show bubbles. It doesn't affect performance, just not nice to look at.

    I've tried it on old Super-takumars, Nikon pre-AI 35/1.4 ... works.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keltzar
    I know Brian. Had coffee with his friend Bob when he was in-town. Nice guy. Brian wrote up that page before we discovered that there IS a legitimate cure, which I've tried and it works.

    Simply, go to Sim Lim and buy a UV lamp. These give out UV-B, and are used for reading watermarks, sun-tanning or party effects. Wrap your lens in alum foil (lenscap off) with only rear-element end exposed and facing the lamp ... about 5-10cm away from tube. After about 2-3 weeks, the yellowing will fade and sometimes disappear. Repeat treatment every 30years if yellowing returns. Keep area well ventilated as not to get too warm ... because that's bad for the compound lens element, which may show bubbles. It doesn't affect performance, just not nice to look at.

    I've tried it on old Super-takumars, Nikon pre-AI 35/1.4 ... works.
    Hmmm... interesting tip.

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