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Thread: Gamma & Saturation issue from Mac to PC & vice versa

  1. #1

    Default Gamma & Saturation issue from Mac to PC & vice versa

    Since the Gamma & colour values on both Mac OS is higher than those of Windows & Linux OS, pictures that looks perfect on Mac may turn out to be dark, different hue & over saturated when viewed on PC.

    Lets face it, Windows default gamma & colour sucks...But we can't expect every Pc user to calibrate their monitors.

    So, those tat uses Mac or those who uses PC but calibrated their monitor, do u actually test ur pics on other normal PC to see if ur pics gonna be as good as what u see on ur own monitor?

  2. #2
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    There is little way of actually 'ensuring' consistant color.
    And we're not even bringing concerns like, brands, age of monitor, how long has it be turned on,ambient lighting,etc....

    For eg,even Pro Imaging studios generally just give their clients a printed hardcopy of the final photo piece. The client is then to go to whichever printer they use and color correct according to that printer copy..

    So beside ur own studio, there is really no easy way to ensure consistant color.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by saberlancer
    There is little way of actually 'ensuring' consistant color.
    And we're not even bringing concerns like, brands, age of monitor, how long has it be turned on,ambient lighting,etc....

    For eg,even Pro Imaging studios generally just give their clients a printed hardcopy of the final photo piece. The client is then to go to whichever printer they use and color correct according to that printer copy..

    So beside ur own studio, there is really no easy way to ensure consistant color.

    Yup, tat's wat i mean...its hard to maintain that consistancy. Especially for screen material...

  4. #4

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    Apple recommends that users use the industry standard of D65 and gamma 2.2 instead of the old D50, gamma 1.8 settings.

    Anyway, if your Mac is properly calibrated, it will looks the same as your PC, and vise versa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oeyvind
    Apple recommends that users use the industry standard of D65 and gamma 2.2 instead of the old D50, gamma 1.8 settings.

    Anyway, if your Mac is properly calibrated, it will looks the same as your PC, and vise versa.
    Tink u misunderstood his post.
    He meant "There is really no way to ensure consistent colors, except your own computers".

    Which is true.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by saberlancer
    Tink u misunderstood his post.
    He meant "There is really no way to ensure consistent colors, except your own computers".

    Which is true.
    No, you actually you can... ^^

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    Quote Originally Posted by oeyvind
    No, you actually you can... ^^

    Er,pls kindly advice..

    For example,
    If I do design in my company.All calibrations done from scan to printer.Perfect!

    1) When attaching my files via email to my clients.How do I ensure that what they see is what I see?

    Assuming work is approved.They now accept the digital file on a CD.Lets assume a .psd file.
    2)How do I ensure that the 'Commercial Printer' that they bring it to prints it as I intended it to be?

    Thanks

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    That why in U S & Europe's graphic people to pro photog use an ICC standard and ICC devices to calibrate their monitors and their output machine like printer, so that all of them talk the language or see the same color spacing. Sadly that have not caught on here, as it is expensive, the printer or graphic house have their own "Custom Seting" which is crap and they were not willing to change what that seen to work for them. With colour management that is poorly manage, one will seem to strike a lottery to get "What You See To What You Get". For ICC to work, photographer to cilents must calibrate their machine to ICC and constantly doing it.

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    ICC = International Colour Consortium. Just in case you are wondering what it mean.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by singscott
    ICC = International Colour Consortium. Just in case you are wondering what it mean.
    Its easy to get accurate colour from PCs to MACs and Screen tp Print. but it is never 100% accurate. even Proof prints for offset films are not 100 % accurate.

    The key is to compromise, you can get colours to be like 90% or 99% similar but it will never be the same.

    Get a gt macbeth and calibrate your monitors

    if you are really rich, get the colour splash print server for the mac the one with the xerox docu print 1255. as close you can get to 100% accurate proofing colour.

    i think it cost 80K
    haha

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    Tink u guys missing the point of original post. Anyway...

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