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Thread: Orange Filter

  1. #1

    Default Orange Filter

    Can anyone post links of how orange filters work and how to utilize them. Or if you feel like typing out an explanation yourself, that would appreciated as well. Thanks!

    Tom

  2. #2

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    If I remember correctly, yellow and orange filters gave very high contrast image which is very good for B/W photography.

  3. #3
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    this should serve your purpose
    http://www.ephotozine.com/techniques....cfm?recid=284

    expect to lose around 1 stop with an orange filter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    this should serve your purpose
    http://www.ephotozine.com/techniques....cfm?recid=284

    expect to lose around 1 stop with an orange filter.
    i think the general rule (correct me if i am wrong) is that 1 step is lost for a piece of coloured filter you use, be it red or orange or green...

  5. #5

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    Thanks for all the help!

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    This field of stuffs consult denniskee. He's the expert man... He got all to wacky ideas for these color filters.
    I tried to experiment it to custom WB with cellophane paper instead. Red, Yellow, Orange. Then you shoot BW mode with these cWB. For mine I can't so I shoot in color. The results when you see it in color is so weird but the after-effect is so magnificient. Orange: You could see layers of clouds. Gray sky with your structure standing out.
    Red: Dramatic clouds, more balanced kind of BW pictures.
    Yellow: A weaker constrast compared to orange.
    Green: Lightens skin tones. Useful for BW portraits. Glamourous 1... Not the "OFFICIAL" use 1... Hehehe.....

  7. #7

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    Generally speaking, colored filters are used in black & white photography. Of course it can be used "creatively" in color photography as well for truly wacky effects!

    The principles of using color filters is to allow its own color to pass through and block others. Classical examples of red and green apples in black & white. Taken straight, the red and green apples will look exactly the same. If one use a green filter, it will lighten the green apples and differentiate the green from the red.

    In landscape photography, the yellow, orange and red darkens the blue sky, making it more dramatic. But foliage can turn very dark with the red, making for uninteresting trees.

    In portraitures, the orange filter can be used for people with orange freckles to reduce facial "blemishes" if that is desired. A blue filter can make the lips very dark by blocking the red lip - a very "gothic" effect"!

    It is not a correct general statement to say that one lose one stop for color filters. For yellow filters up to Wratten #15, there may not be a significant loss of light. But from orange and darker (red), you may progressively lose more stops depending on the degree of darkness of the red.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by student
    It is not a correct general statement to say that one lose one stop for color filters. For yellow filters up to Wratten #15, there may not be a significant loss of light. But from orange and darker (red), you may progressively lose more stops depending on the degree of darkness of the red.
    Or can try using CWB on the color filter (if you have, for me, cellophane paper will do just fine) 1st, remove the filter than start shooting (Just in case, I am talking about digital camera here). This way, you dont loose any light even with red filter (for more dramatic effect on sky). No degrading on image quality (since some believe optical quality of filter varies from brand to brand) since you are not shooting through the filter anymore.

    If you digital camera has b&w function, shoot after setting CWB with the desire color filter.

    If not, shoot in color (of cause lar, no b&w mah) after setting the CWB with the desire color filter. In PS, convert to b&w using greyscale. Simple as ABC.
    photography makes one sees things from all angles.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by denniskee
    Or can try using CWB on the color filter (if you have, for me, cellophane paper will do just fine) 1st, remove the filter than start shooting (Just in case, I am talking about digital camera here). This way, you dont loose any light even with red filter (for more dramatic effect on sky). No degrading on image quality (since some believe optical quality of filter varies from brand to brand) since you are not shooting through the filter anymore.

    If you digital camera has b&w function, shoot after setting CWB with the desire color filter.

    If not, shoot in color (of cause lar, no b&w mah) after setting the CWB with the desire color filter. In PS, convert to b&w using greyscale. Simple as ABC.
    My statements are directed to the old fashion analogue black & white photography. I have absolutely no idea what digi-talk is all about!

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    Hahaha.... Get Yellow_Kiwi to talk to... He's another manual photographer...

  11. #11

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    Check out this thread over at Shuttertalk. They were just discussing the same thing the other day.

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