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Thread: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

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    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    This guide serves a few main purposes:

    1) To give a quick glance over the types of competitions, different systems of selecting of winners and to some extent, chances of winning.
    2) To highlight Copyright related issues with regards to competition
    3) To assist the photographer to make an informed decision

    This guide is NOT a how to win competitions. So steer clear if you think it will teach you how to win.

    Do feel free to mention where is lacking and what other things could be added on, which i will add on to the first few posts if required.
    Last edited by allenleonhart; 24th August 2011 at 05:53 PM.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Competitions:

    All of us are competitive. To some extent, we all want to see how much "better" we are compared to the fellow beside us.
    We want to win the big fat DSLR on the top of the list of prizes. For whatever reasons people support, there will be organisers who will hold competitions, catering to the needs of different people.

    For the ease of this guide, I will not be listing out industry related awards limited only to industry players (such as Icon de Martell Cordon Bleu).

    First: Competition via Panel of Judges (with relevant expertise)

    The first thing that should be noted:

    Competition judges are subjective. Just because someone won first prize does not mean mean he is good. Neither does it imply someone who doesn't is bad.

    The chances of winning a Panel of Judges competition should be relatively high, as compared to other competitions which will be highlighted, assuming that skill and creativity wise you are of a certain standard.

    • The first round of judging would be a quick run through of the photos, to find those that first catch their eye.
    • Second round often will involve some level of arguing between the judges as they decide which are their favourites.
    • Process further repeats for latter rounds, but more time is spent on each photo for each increased round.



    This is a common system used by many photography competitions. It may vary to some degree, but the essence still remains mostly the same.

    It is my personal experience that there is a tendency for older judges (above age of 60) and are members of existing photography societies to focus more on the technicalities and visual appeal.

    Younger judges are more towards contemporary art, placing emphasis on meaning behind the images. Visual appeal may help, but sometimes the lack of visual appeal may aid in bringing across the idea of the image, which will be a plus point. Visual literacy will come into play here.

    Do note: Personal experience. It differs from people to people.

    Second: Competition via Panel of Judges (without relevant expertise)

    Pretty much the same as the previous, but with a much higher chance of usual "Fisheye" shots getting in.


    Third: Competition via Voting

    This type of competition is getting increasingly popular with organisers.
    • There is reduced costs required (Facebook) and less hassle to invite external judges.
    • Helps with advertising as there can be vast outreach.
    • Easier to collate results.




    To conclude this small part on types of competition systems, let me end off with a quote (which I can roughly remember) from a marketing manager from a company that produces cameras, which i had the privilege to interact and learn from.

    Different types of competition caters to the needs of different people. Take for example, a voting system. You can call it kelong, yet you can also say we are literally parking the whole set of equipments, to the group which is most united and are willing to vote together, which is in a way, our method of development of photography. There are also other competitions, catered to the more competitive, which we organise. If the competition does not suit your needs, why force yourself to join?
    Last edited by allenleonhart; 24th August 2011 at 09:02 PM.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Copyrights:

    This is very important, for any photographer who takes pride in their intellectual property.

    Many enthusiasts which just started photography, all do not hold their shots too dear. Afterall, they just started, they might be thinking: what skill do they actually feel they have?

    My advice to these enthusiasts is to consider that your photos are important, because
    • Time is taken to create the shots.
    • Time is taken to improve your skill.
    • Money is invested in your camera.
    • The shots are your memories, or your view of a matter.


    Together, they actually do have value. Even if you think your shot sucks, if the Public Relations think it is good, it has a monetary value. It is not a far stretch to say that every shot is worth something. How you and others view it, will decide its value.

    How does copyright come into play then? Knowing your rights prevent people from taking advantage of you.

    Consider a following case: A photographer in the industry, who has consistently produced works that are accepted and appreciated by others, decides to create a single photograph.

    He can choose to:
    • sell the photo
    • use it for competition


    In the case where the copyrights are transferred to the competition organiser, the photographer cannot sell the photo any more, nor use it for other competitions any more. The photo will be the property of the organiser, even if the photograph does not win any prize.

    In this case, the photographer might be better off selling the photo.

    This is merely a hypothetical situation. Personal preference and how one views their work will play a larger role and may not reflect the same views as mentioned.

    Here is an example of a copyright being transferred to the organiser.

    All entries become the property of Keppel Land who shall enjoy all rights attached to such entries including the right but not the obligation to use or reproduce them and the names of all participants for any marketing, publicity or promotional purposes. The entries will not be returned and may not be acknowledged. Keppel Land shall also enjoy the right to publish. All participants are deemed to have agreed to give Keppel Land a non-exclusive license to use or publish their entries. Each participant is deemed to consent to such use with no monetary payment.
    As highlighted, once the rights are transferred over to the organiser, the photographer cannot use the image any more. It no longer becomes the property of the photographer.

    An example of a copyright which still remains to the photographer
    All images shot during the workshop remain the property of the individual photographers. The organisers
    request that photographers waive the rights to payment when they are used for related marketing purposes.
    Which in my opinion, is a more balanced and fair condition towards the photographer. We can understand that the photos do have value, allowing the organiser to use them, will benefit them. So long as the rights belong to us, we can submit it for other competitions, or for other uses such as sales.


    I hope that this short walkthrough will give a rough idea and assist the photographer to make an informed decision. Ultimately, different competitions cater to different needs, but do understand what you are signing up first and protect yourself.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Additional Information

    With regards to the issue of Model Release and Location Release, a good estimate would be that anything within public space will not require either of those.

    Copyright in Public Buildings:
    under section 64, the copyright of a building or a model of a building is not infringed by the making of a painting, drawing, engraving or photograph of the building or model by the inclusion of the building or model by the or model in a cinematograph film or in a television broadcast.
    However, with regards to private locations, such as the insides of Ion Orchard, permission to shoot/location release will be required. Any attempt to shoot without one, will result in security running towards you faster than you can setup a tripod. You can also face lawsuits with regards to privacy claims etc etc etc.

    What is a Location Release?
    A Location Release is a legal document that serves as a waiver of any potential right to privacy claims, and unauthorized commercial use claims, by the owner of the property. Its primary purpose is to protect the photographer and subsequent users of the photographs from future claims by the owner of the property photographed that their privacy rights were violated, or that the image of their property was used for commercial purposes without their authorization.
    As for Model Release
    A model release, known in similar contexts as a liability waiver, is a legal release typically signed by the subject of a photograph granting permission to publish the photograph in one form or another. The legal rights of the signatories in reference to the material is thereafter subject to the allowances and restrictions stated in the release, and also possibly in exchange for compensation paid to the photographed.

    For more information, I would recommend one to buy the Professional Photography Handbook by the Professional Photographers Association Singapore. It contains both a sample Model Release and Location Release form.




    This is intended as a simple, general explanation of Property Releases and Model Releases as they pertain to photos intended for commercial use. The content should not be considered a definitive guide, nor legal advice. Consult with a legal expert should you require proper legal advice.
    Last edited by allenleonhart; 24th August 2011 at 09:05 PM.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    *reserved for even more further uses*

  6. #6

    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    If you sell the photo, photos containing people or property that can be recognized may need model and property releases too. Suggest this to be included.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Quote Originally Posted by lioneldude View Post
    If you sell the photo, photos containing people or property that can be recognized may need model and property releases too. Suggest this to be included.
    actually... only limited to private buildings

    Copyright in Public Buildings:
    under section 64, the copyright of a building or a model of a building is not infringed by the making of a painting, drawing, engraving or photograph of the building or model by the inclusion of the building or model by the or model in a cinematograph film or in a television broadcast.


    i'll insert it as a caveat. unless competition specifically requires you to shoot within a private building, as in the case of capital land mall and nat geo, don't think you will even get to setup a tripod and shoot, as security in singapore are generally fast enough to chase you away.
    There is also the issue of what is considered public space and private. Does shooting the exterior of a tourist hotspot, such as MBS, requires a location release?

    as for model releases, a good practice, but not too sure if it is required in Singapore. Then again, there is also the idea of photos shot in public space etc etc.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Shooting on the exterior of MBS by the boardwalk (if that piece of land belongs to MBS) for non-commercial purposes is allowed. However if you plan to shoot with huge lighting setups etc, you will probably need approval from the management.

    One more point: Formula One. All still and moving pictures captured at a Formula One event belong to the Formula One management. However, they have stated that as long as the spectator captures these for own private enjoyment and not for commercial purposes, they allow you to shoot. However, usage of any formula one related logos and trademarks is strictly prohibited. If you paste an F1 logo on your picture and share it with others on your sites, you may be deemed to be using their logo illegally. Same for F1 videos, some videos are posted to YouTube but are forced to be removed.

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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Quote Originally Posted by lioneldude View Post
    Shooting on the exterior of MBS by the boardwalk (if that piece of land belongs to MBS) for non-commercial purposes is allowed. However if you plan to shoot with huge lighting setups etc, you will probably need approval from the management.

    One more point: Formula One. All still and moving pictures captured at a Formula One event belong to the Formula One management. However, they have stated that as long as the spectator captures these for own private enjoyment and not for commercial purposes, they allow you to shoot. However, usage of any formula one related logos and trademarks is strictly prohibited. If you paste an F1 logo on your picture and share it with others on your sites, you may be deemed to be using their logo illegally. Same for F1 videos, some videos are posted to YouTube but are forced to be removed.
    well wouldnt that fall outside onto commercial photography already? a nice to know, but certainly not required for the average enthusiast i believe...

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart View Post
    well wouldnt that fall outside onto commercial photography already? a nice to know, but certainly not required for the average enthusiast i believe...
    I guess might be useful if they try to do stock photos with it.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Yeah maybe that could be another guide in a different sub forum.

    Good job btw!

  12. #12

    Default Re: Competitions: A quick walkthrough

    Great thread & very informative Keep going

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