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Thread: Starting out equips

  1. #1

    Default Starting out equips

    hi guys I understand that no matter what equips you use, it is ultimately the photographer that makes a diff not entirely the equipment. However I need some advice as to whether the D7000 is adequate to be used for paid assignments?

    Cause my dream set-up is to have 2 DSLR bodies, 1 full frame and 1 cropped body. I am aiming to get a D700 and D7000 in the near future.
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  2. #2

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by Exhaust View Post
    hi guys I understand that no matter what equips you use, it is ultimately the photographer that makes a diff not entirely the equipment. However I need some advice as to whether the D7000 is adequate to be used for paid assignments?

    Cause my dream set-up is to have 2 DSLR bodies, 1 full frame and 1 cropped body. I am aiming to get a D700 and D7000 in the near future.
    You will usually hear people saying its the photographer not the equipment, but in reality you need the proper tools to properly do the job, tackle the difficulties of the situation/terrain, and also to express your vision and creatively properly.

    Seriously, that phrase/advice is for people with GAS - Gear Acquiring Syndrome or for people who believe gear is everything.

    In general, event shooters need good ISO capability, fast zooms and a good flash, if that is what you wanna know since your going to shoot a birthday party at a ballroom soon right?

    Many photographers had been shooting with far lesser capable cams than the D7000 for many years so you needn't worry.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
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    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Hi TS,

    To answer directly to your question, the answer is 'Yes, Nikon's D7000 is a more than a good enough camera for paid assignment (although I am not sure which genre of paid assignment you are referring to.". I am sure with today's technology advancement, the D7000 features are a luxury to many photographers who have started out when the dSLR first evolved from its film predecessor. For one, I started off with the Canon's EOS 10D. Comparing the 10D with the D7000, the technology gap is really miles apart. I have transferred the 10D to my friend when I expanded my equipment due assignment requirements. Till today, my friend is still using the 10D for his work.

    I assume that you are already adequate in terms of technical skill and having developed the style of your own that is accepted by your clients. Eventually, what you need is a set of backup equipment. You (and some others) might look at a D7000 and a D700 to give you the versality of both a cropped and full-frame body. I personally prefer 2 of the same kind so that I can go easy on the accessories and have to remember less(er) in terms of changing my shooting style when i need to switch to a back up or have to use 2 cameras at the same time (rather common in large scale events coverage, e.g. Concerts). I would also add that backup equipment goes beyond the camera body but your accessories as well. However, grow you gear only when you are ready. Do not go full-scale with your gear equipping as you will end up spending unnecessary money and retiring a lot of equipment before you have make use of them fully. One observation I made is that people dispose their cameras very fast these days (including pro models). This means that you can actually consider getting a used piece of backup equipment to lower your total cost of ownership (TCO).

    Hope my lengthy contribution can be of some help to you in path towards learning the art of doing business in the photography industry. Cheers and all the best


    Daniel
    Last edited by oracle0711; 7th August 2011 at 09:55 AM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Further to what others have mentioned, the best equipments are those that you are comfortable with to produce your work.

    Latest and greatest gear although don't make one a better photographer, but it certainly makes the process easier.

    Depending on what type of jobs one is thinking of getting, the equipment generally dictate by it. Backup equipment though is very much recommended, but it is still a luxury when it comes to cost.

    So it boils down to what you want to do and how you deal with your clients as well as how you word your contract.

    Regards,

    Hart

  5. #5
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Starting out equips

    get 1-2 good prime lens (suitable focal length) and/or a 24-100 range zoom lens (fast lens like f2.8) and an external flash, and u are ready to go!
    Last edited by sinned79; 7th August 2011 at 02:54 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by oracle0711 View Post
    Hi TS,

    To answer directly to your question, the answer is 'Yes, Nikon's D7000 is a more than a good enough camera for paid assignment (although I am not sure which genre of paid assignment you are referring to.". I am sure with today's technology advancement, the D7000 features are a luxury to many photographers who have started out when the dSLR first evolved from its film predecessor. For one, I started off with the Canon's EOS 10D. Comparing the 10D with the D7000, the technology gap is really miles apart. I have transferred the 10D to my friend when I expanded my equipment due assignment requirements. Till today, my friend is still using the 10D for his work.

    I assume that you are already adequate in terms of technical skill and having developed the style of your own that is accepted by your clients. Eventually, what you need is a set of backup equipment. You (and some others) might look at a D7000 and a D700 to give you the versality of both a cropped and full-frame body. I personally prefer 2 of the same kind so that I can go easy on the accessories and have to remember less(er) in terms of changing my shooting style when i need to switch to a back up or have to use 2 cameras at the same time (rather common in large scale events coverage, e.g. Concerts). I would also add that backup equipment goes beyond the camera body but your accessories as well. However, grow you gear only when you are ready. Do not go full-scale with your gear equipping as you will end up spending unnecessary money and retiring a lot of equipment before you have make use of them fully. One observation I made is that people dispose their cameras very fast these days (including pro models). This means that you can actually consider getting a used piece of backup equipment to lower your total cost of ownership (TCO).

    Hope my lengthy contribution can be of some help to you in path towards learning the art of doing business in the photography industry. Cheers and all the best


    Daniel
    Thanks Daniel for your advice. I actually intended to go on a '3 year plan', basically to slowly upgrade my lens as i go for the first 3 years and thereafter get a better body. Something i adopted from froknowsphoto haha but i think it is a logical plan, so that is what i am targetting for =)

    But recently i've gotten a paid assignment as i have written in the forums here: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/threa...grapher-charge so i am pretty worried about using a D3100 to cover the event as the noise control for my D3100 aint that great and i plan not to use an ISO setting more than 800.
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  7. #7

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by Agetan View Post
    Further to what others have mentioned, the best equipments are those that you are comfortable with to produce your work.

    Latest and greatest gear although don't make one a better photographer, but it certainly makes the process easier.

    Depending on what type of jobs one is thinking of getting, the equipment generally dictate by it. Backup equipment though is very much recommended, but it is still a luxury when it comes to cost.

    So it boils down to what you want to do and how you deal with your clients as well as how you word your contract.

    Regards,

    Hart
    Thanks Hart, yea i am totally comfortable with my D3100, having played with it for quite a while now =) I guess i hafta really push myself and my equips to the limits first and upgrade later once i am better at photography. Cause i can't help but feel that it is kinda tough to use the D3100 for paid assignments. I cant do stuff like bracketing and noise control for the D3100 is not really 'there', just to name a few concerns of using my D3100 for paid assignments.
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  8. #8

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    get 1-2 good prime lens (suitable focal length) and/or a 24-100 range zoom lens (fast lens like f2.8) and an external flash, and u are ready to go!
    The equips i am using are:
    1. Nikon D3100
    2. Nikkor 35mm f1.8G
    3. Sigma 18-50mm f2.8
    4. SB900

    I guess i will be trying to use my prime lens most of the time for the event as the quality of the Nikkor lens is definitely better than the Sigma and it is a faster lens as well. Only problem is i have to 'leg zoom' alot when taking close up shots and group shots. Hopefully they wont be doing a 40 person group shot haha
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  9. #9
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by Exhaust View Post
    The equips i am using are:
    1. Nikon D3100
    2. Nikkor 35mm f1.8G
    3. Sigma 18-50mm f2.8
    4. SB900

    I guess i will be trying to use my prime lens most of the time for the event as the quality of the Nikkor lens is definitely better than the Sigma and it is a faster lens as well. Only problem is i have to 'leg zoom' alot when taking close up shots and group shots. Hopefully they wont be doing a 40 person group shot haha
    u probably need one more longer zoom lens as u may missed some shoots whilst changing lens.

  10. #10
    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
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    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Hi Douglas,

    I see. Saw your threat about being asked to take on a private event. Would be good to have a spare body with your in case of 'emergency'. Since you are just charging your client $50 per hour, you might want to consider renting or borrowing from a friend. Always good to be safe especially this event might eventually lead to more opportunities from those who attend the event.

    Anyway, wishing you a good start!

    Cheers


    Daniel

    Quote Originally Posted by Exhaust View Post
    Thanks Daniel for your advice. I actually intended to go on a '3 year plan', basically to slowly upgrade my lens as i go for the first 3 years and thereafter get a better body. Something i adopted from froknowsphoto haha but i think it is a logical plan, so that is what i am targetting for =)

    But recently i've gotten a paid assignment as i have written in the forums here: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/threa...grapher-charge so i am pretty worried about using a D3100 to cover the event as the noise control for my D3100 aint that great and i plan not to use an ISO setting more than 800.

  11. #11
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Re: Starting out equips

    if u dunno what u need... ur probably not ready for paid assignments yet

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oracle0711
    Hi Douglas,

    I see. Saw your threat about being asked to take on a private event. Would be good to have a spare body with your in case of 'emergency'. Since you are just charging your client $50 per hour, you might want to consider renting or borrowing from a friend. Always good to be safe especially this event might eventually lead to more opportunities from those who attend the event.

    Anyway, wishing you a good start!

    Cheers

    Daniel
    yea I was thinking of renting a D7000
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart
    if u dunno what u need... ur probably not ready for paid assignments yet
    well it's my first so I'm kinda gan chiong haha
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  14. #14

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    This is a spin off reply from your original thread about How should an amateur photographer charge? but also address this thread.

    I can see now you are being concerned whether you have the right gear or adequate equipment for the job, facing with your situation of a possibly low light hotel ballroom with high ceilings, or possibility needing to do wide angle group shots of large group, thus needing more depth of field, thus needing more light or better ISO capability.

    Photographers invest in good and often expensive equipment to create better pictures.

    Clients invest in good and often expensive photographers to obtain better pictures.

    Actually, photographers not just invested in expensive equipment, but also countless hours of practice, training, paid seminars and workshops, trials and errors and learning new knowledge to improve their pictures.

    Actually, clients not just invested in photographers but also invested in the support team like makeup artists, assistants, stylists, producers, to improve the pictures they are getting.

    If its commercial work, it translate to better viewership, better sales, better branding and better profits for the clients.

    If its private work ie weddings, it translate to better documenting of memories of a day where the couple is in the peak of their youth, their looks, young love, the day where so many friends and family gather in attendance just for them, with albums surviving longer than the clients, going into family archives.

    In short, photography is valuable. Damn valuable.

    If you do not have the backup camera, the proper lenses, then charge your client $80 per hour and use that extra money to rent the proper stuff. Can you now see why you are now worth $80 per hour as suggested by JasonB in your original thread, or even more?

    Photographers who own multiple bodies, multiple lenses, multiple flashes, network of assistants, co-shooters, etc, had already upfront put in the money to pay for such expenses, and thus are charging the amount they need to, to keep their business sound, intact and thriving, as pointed out by Catchlights in your original thread.

    Just my humble opinion, and my humble efforts in reaffirming the value of photography into the minds of people reading these threads. Both including photographers and clients.
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  15. #15

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Quote Originally Posted by sjackal View Post
    This is a spin off reply from your original thread about How should an amateur photographer charge? but also address this thread.

    I can see now you are being concerned whether you have the right gear or adequate equipment for the job, facing with your situation of a possibly low light hotel ballroom with high ceilings, or possibility needing to do wide angle group shots of large group, thus needing more depth of field, thus needing more light or better ISO capability.

    Photographers invest in good and often expensive equipment to create better pictures.

    Clients invest in good and often expensive photographers to obtain better pictures.

    Actually, photographers not just invested in expensive equipment, but also countless hours of practice, training, paid seminars and workshops, trials and errors and learning new knowledge to improve their pictures.

    Actually, clients not just invested in photographers but also invested in the support team like makeup artists, assistants, stylists, producers, to improve the pictures they are getting.

    If its commercial work, it translate to better viewership, better sales, better branding and better profits for the clients.

    If its private work ie weddings, it translate to better documenting of memories of a day where the couple is in the peak of their youth, their looks, young love, the day where so many friends and family gather in attendance just for them, with albums surviving longer than the clients, going into family archives.

    In short, photography is valuable. Damn valuable.

    If you do not have the backup camera, the proper lenses, then charge your client $80 per hour and use that extra money to rent the proper stuff. Can you now see why you are now worth $80 per hour as suggested by JasonB in your original thread, or even more?

    Photographers who own multiple bodies, multiple lenses, multiple flashes, network of assistants, co-shooters, etc, had already upfront put in the money to pay for such expenses, and thus are charging the amount they need to, to keep their business sound, intact and thriving, as pointed out by Catchlights in your original thread.

    Just my humble opinion, and my humble efforts in reaffirming the value of photography into the minds of people reading these threads. Both including photographers and clients.
    Thanks sjackal! That was really insightful and definitely something that i did not consider. As in my mind it was just whether my equips can do the job, my skills can i do the job, i am only amateur with close to 0 experience, is it right to charge people that much.

    I guess i am being very superficial about the photography business. But thanks to what you said, it really made me think deeper into it =)
    [Chasing the Light]
    Canon EOS 1D MK III user =X

  16. #16

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    Hi TS, maybe you need to do a reverse thinking - if your client asks you whether your current equipment is ready for the assignment he/she is going to pay you, how would you answer them instantly?
    You'll know the answer yourself best once you have shot a lot and know whether your photos can be sold at your desired price based on your equipment you have.
    Kent Wong Photography |Leica Q & Leica M-P 240 | 75 & 28mm Summilux

  17. #17

    Default Re: Starting out equips

    [QUOTE=sjackal;7371704]

    In short, photography is valuable. Damn valuable. [\quote]

    This is darn true... But us a human only know what is valuable when something is lost.

    Regards,

    Hart

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