Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

  1. #1

    Default Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    I was shooting with the D7000 in high key lighting and the white background came out "hazy" looking
    and the contrast of the person and the background was also blurry.

    Anyone knows what's the problem or how to solve the problem?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    NPNT. Post it with EXIF intact.
    Alpha

  3. #3

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    the problematic pics






    Kindly advise!

    Thanks!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    My few cents
    The stray lights from some of the strobes is probably shining at the lens causing the loss of contrast.
    Usually its the strobes that are flashing in the direction of the camera/lens.
    Reposition camera or flash or use a flag.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Hi TS, Highkey lighting by definition will produce a bright and low contrast picture consisting of mostly white or middle tones.Of course
    not all low contrast scenes are bright it may be dark too.I think placement of subject with relation to your lights affect the outcome,for instance the top photo has a less then white tone at the right side because either the lighting angle is short and does not light up background fully or not set for higher power to reach there.The second photo is much better.Standard setup is two lights at 45 degrees on either side of subject to give even lighting resulting in almost no shadow.Frankly I don't see anything wrong with your output of course you can PP in photoshop to your liking.
    Last edited by one eye jack; 22nd July 2011 at 10:22 AM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    10,849

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    could be flash power not enough or coverage not enough.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Thanks all! Was thinking it was the problem with my camera because a few of us was shooting
    and only i had the problem. the other people tried to help me for a while but could not solve the
    problem also .....so i was thinking I might have unwittingly changed some settings in my camera or
    something.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    The light from the flash is going into the lens. You need to restrict where the flash light goes. Put a piece of black cardboard (go tape/paint it) or something at the side of your flash that is nearest to the camera

  9. #9
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    TS, for high key lighting, there is not enough light on the model. The light on your background is also unbalanced, causing one side of the background to be overexposed and the other side darker.

    Your images does not contain EXIF, so I cannot see what your camera settings are, or what metering modes you are actually using. And may I ask what is the aperture you are using?

    Here are is a video to show you how to do a high key portrait properly.


  10. #10

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Thanks brapodam and daredevil123.
    Not sure how to post image with EXIF, so I list them down

    Aperture: F11 to F14
    Metering: Pattern
    ISO:200
    Exposure Bias: 0 step, +0.7 to +1 step
    shutter : 1/100 t0 1/200 sec
    white balance: auto
    Exposure program: manual
    Contrast, saturartion, sharpness : normal

    Also, would using a lens hood prevent the flash from getting into the flash? (actually,can't remember if i used one ...)

    Thanks in advance!

  11. #11
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    10,849

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by cws77 View Post
    Also, would using a lens hood prevent the flash from getting into the flash? (actually,can't remember if i used one ...)
    why would you want to use a lens hood in indoor environment?

  12. #12

    Default

    Might be color profile that u were using

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79
    why would you want to use a lens hood in indoor environment?
    If the model accidentally kicked your tripod, your hood saves the day

  14. #14

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    I seldom shoot studio and may not be in the position to comment but here is my explanation;

    - That lost of contrast is a mild form of lens flare.
    - This is happening because there is a hot-spot/un-even/overly strong background light, contrast between the foreground and background is too big.
    - Your lens or filter may be the culpirt. Some lenses are more prone to backlight flare than others. And a lousy filter as well.
    - School of thought problem; some people like a heavily blown-out background (explains edge glow along the subject) for high-key shots but in my opinion just do a +2 to +3 stops vs subject so you don't challenge your lens/sensor. Do rmb you can always blow it out in post, though the look is different. If you don't have light meter just take a shot of the white background and check the histogram; all highlights to the verge of over-exposing or just blown (if you shoot raw you can let it over-expose slightly).

  15. #15
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    10,849

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Sgdevilzz View Post
    If the model accidentally kicked your tripod, your hood saves the day
    dun think any model are that dumb (if u ever shoot in a studio before you will know why i say dumb. The length btw the model and you are usually so apart). and btw, rarely ppl will use a tripod in a studio anyway, i dun see a need to and it also limits your angle of composition too.
    Last edited by sinned79; 25th July 2011 at 07:39 AM.

  16. #16
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Problem with shooting in a high key lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by cws77 View Post
    Thanks brapodam and daredevil123.
    Not sure how to post image with EXIF, so I list them down

    Aperture: F11 to F14
    Metering: Pattern
    ISO:200
    Exposure Bias: 0 step, +0.7 to +1 step
    shutter : 1/100 t0 1/200 sec
    white balance: auto
    Exposure program: manual
    Contrast, saturartion, sharpness : normal

    Also, would using a lens hood prevent the flash from getting into the flash? (actually,can't remember if i used one ...)

    Thanks in advance!
    I think it will be helpful to watch that video I posted and take note of the important points. Especially the part about balancing the light that falls on the model and the light flashing on the background.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •