Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Filter experience discussion needed.

  1. #1

    Default Filter experience discussion needed.

    I recently saw some green-enhanced filters and yellow filters.

    Anyone can share some real life experience of using this 2 filters? (yes, esp. you Ian )

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default Re: Filter experience discussion needed.

    Originally posted by Shadus
    I recently saw some green-enhanced filters and yellow filters.

    Anyone can share some real life experience of using this 2 filters? (yes, esp. you Ian )
    Shadus, there's a whole series of green and yellow filters. Can you be more specific please.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default

    If I am not wrong (experts correct me if I am), the red/orange/green filters are meant for shooting B&W. The Red/Orange/Yellow increases contrast, green - can't remember.

    Regards
    CK

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Ok here you go, the rough guide to filters for B/W photography, this is not a full list, but these are the most commonly used filters.

    Y2 (K2) - Wratten #8
    A yellow filter, good for landscapes, general outdoor photography and sports. Blocks UV up to 485nm. Increases contrast between sky and clouds. Great as a general B/W filter and works very well with stone and brick etc in full sun. Also used with Ektachrome IR films. Filter factor 2.

    Y3 - Wratten #12
    An Orange filter, good for landscapes, architecture etc. Darkens sky and increases contrast significantly. Brightens Yellow tones. Blocks UV to 535nm. Also used with Ektachrome IR film. Filter factor 3.

    Y0 - Wratten #16
    A Yellow Orange filter. Great for Caucasian skin, and clears up skin tones wonderfully, especially freckles. Darkens up skies noticably in landscape shots and produces very good thunderstorm like clouds. Blocks UV to 545nm and can be used with Ektachrome IR film. Filter factor 2.5

    R25 (R8) Wratten #25
    A dark red filter. Great for landscapes, darkens Violet, Blue and greens. Produces stunning clouds and skies. Ideally suited for mountain and cloud photography. Lightens reds and oranges. Also used for Ektachrome IR film. Blocks UV to 600nm and has a filter factor of 6-8.

    X0 (YG2,5) Wratten #550 (from memory)
    Yellow-Green filter that's ideally suited for landscapes, creates greater distinctions between hues of green. Also excellent for outdoor portraiture with clean tinted skin tones and accentuated lips (Caucasian skin tones). Filter factor 2.5

    X1 - Wratten #11
    Green filter that's excellent for meadow and forest seperation in landscape photography. Also good for outdoor portraiture with soft lighting and backlight scenes. Filter factor 4. Can also be used to correct for tungsten light in B/W photography.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Hehe looks like I haven't been missed.

    CK, when using colours with black and white film stock, the effect is not one of an increase or decrease in contrast generally, but by achieving the result by lightening the colours similar to the filter in the scene, and darkening contrasting colours. Green is sometimes used with portraits to enhance the film's response to the skin tones, and to set apart lips, etc. Red is often used to boost the contrast in the sky because it lets very little blue light through, hence "darkening" the blue parts of the sky while leaving the clouds light.

  6. #6

    Default

    Ian, thanks for the informative B/W photography explanation

    I'm unable to tell u wht filter it is as I didn't really take note of the filter name but I do know its not for B/W photography.

    I remember tht they shop keeper told me to the effect that its a 'green-enhanced' filter. (Its in jap, so that's my closest translation). He say its good for taking greeneries. I'm pretty curious as I was taking some greeneries recently and it didn't turn out as nice as what I see on the net. So I'm just looking around at techniques, films, filters etc to achieve much more livelier greens

    Perhaps I'm still naive in my photography skills. I'm just exploring

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default

    Originally posted by Jed
    Hehe looks like I haven't been missed.

    CK, when using colours with black and white film stock, the effect is not one of an increase or decrease in contrast generally, but by achieving the result by lightening the colours similar to the filter in the scene, and darkening contrasting colours. Green is sometimes used with portraits to enhance the film's response to the skin tones, and to set apart lips, etc. Red is often used to boost the contrast in the sky because it lets very little blue light through, hence "darkening" the blue parts of the sky while leaving the clouds light.
    Thanks for the refresher. It has been like over ten years since I last touched B&W, coloured filters, etc.

    Regards
    CK

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Originally posted by Shadus
    Ian, thanks for the informative B/W photography explanation


    I remember tht they shop keeper told me to the effect that its a 'green-enhanced' filter. (Its in jap, so that's my closest translation). He say its good for taking greeneries. I'm pretty curious as I was taking some greeneries recently and it didn't turn out as nice as what I see on the net. So I'm just looking around at techniques, films, filters etc to achieve much more livelier greens
    Ahh, Enhancing filters, Companies such as Tiffen and Singh Ray make these as does Hoya.

    Singh Ray's enhancers are available to boost red, blue and green hues as well as a general all over accentuator for cold and warm hues. They aren't cheap at around $160-190 USD per filter.

    Tiffen and Hoya's enhancing filters are cheaper and both enhance red, brown and orange tones, giving an increase in saturation and contrast.

    The Tiffen and Hoya filters are made with didymium glass and are good for foliage, rocks and in some cases architectural work.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  9. #9

    Default

    ooh..... so i guess you just snap them on and ...viola!

    heh heh.... ian, do you use them at all?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Originally posted by Shadus
    ooh..... so i guess you just snap them on and ...viola!

    heh heh.... ian, do you use them at all?
    Yep, fit em and off you go.

    I played around with them a few years ago. Personally can't stand the damn things.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •