Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Normal camera recommendation

  1. #1

    Default Normal camera recommendation

    Hey I'm looking for an all purpose general camera cause the current one I have takes horrible photos at night.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera that is good at macro shots and portraits ( like the photo will catch the natural skin tone, rather than it always turning out very harsh with flash and all)

    Budget isn't that much of a concern .

    Btw what is the view on the new NEX camera by Sony?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Hey I'm looking for an all purpose general camera cause the current one I have takes horrible photos at night.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera that is good at macro shots and portraits ( like the photo will catch the natural skin tone, rather than it always turning out very harsh with flash and all)

    Budget isn't that much of a concern .

    Btw what is the view on the new NEX camera by Sony?
    Hi, It's hard to answer your question because you are not being specific enough.I think it's arises from not understanding basic digital camara technology.Your current camera is probably a compact with a 1/2 inch or 12.5mm sensor.If you read enough reviews of such cameras whether low or high end compacts,they are capable of low light shooting what with the dynamic range capability where a few frames are taken
    and processed in camera to give a good picture.But high end compacts cost as much or slightly lower than entry level DSLR which have a much larger sensor APS-C or FF (full frame) for light gathering sensivity and colour reproduction and the ability
    to capture in RAW format straight from the sensor while low end compacts only output
    the compressed JPEG format resulting in loss of some picture data.RAW allows PP (post processing) in photo software like Adobe photoshop to convert the RAW to better quality JPEG than straight from the camera itself which may be acceptable to
    unsophisticated users thus saving you the trouble of learning the software as well as picture taking techniques.Since your budget is no problem,I would suggest you do more research into what you really want and compare the cameras with regards to what is achievable in reality. All the best. PS even if a camera is suggested that is capable of fulfilling your needs you may be hard put to make full use of it's potential.Understand the technology takes you a long way.For low light you will take the camera's ISO or light sensivity and the F stop into consideration.Lower
    F stop ,the shorter the shutter time reducing camera shake not with standing electronic stabalisation built in.
    Last edited by one eye jack; 11th June 2011 at 06:15 PM.

  3. #3
    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NA
    Posts
    5,247

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Hey I'm looking for an all purpose general camera cause the current one I have takes horrible photos at night.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera that is good at macro shots and portraits ( like the photo will catch the natural skin tone, rather than it always turning out very harsh with flash and all)

    Budget isn't that much of a concern .

    Btw what is the view on the new NEX camera by Sony?
    What are you looking for in the first place, Mirrorless format, DSLR, SLT etc, or are you looking at a prosumer camera? By the way there are many ways to improve your shots with and without flash. I mean even if you are using a DSLR but uses flash directly on your subject, it is obvious that you will get a very harsh effect. That is why we normally go without flash, or even with flash, we would use different flash technique such as bouncing the flash, tilting the flash head in another direction, or using off-shoe flash, etc.

    I have seen some really good macro photos online whereby the shooter uses only prosumer camera, they might need some addons, off shoe flashes, etc to achieve that effect.

    So first, you have to look at the camera you are using and your own techniques.

    And btw, NEX is not a new camera, it has been around for some time now. It is a good camera though. Do look at other mirrorless format such as offering from Samsung (NX series), Olympus (Pen series), Panasonic (G and GH series). And also look into investing in an external flash system too.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    i think before TS starts and jumps into a new camera system, what is the camera that TS is using first that gives horrid photos? if there is a way to rectify the problem with the current camera, i think TS should look into that first

  5. #5

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Hey I'm looking for an all purpose general camera cause the current one I have takes horrible photos at night.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera that is good at macro shots and portraits ( like the photo will catch the natural skin tone, rather than it always turning out very harsh with flash and all)

    Budget isn't that much of a concern .

    Btw what is the view on the new NEX camera by Sony?
    What camera are you using now?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Look like TS is using a p&s cam or an iphone now. lol

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    3,443

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    I used to shoot on a Powershot A650 and it takes horrible pictures at night. After switching to DSLR and also learning some of the basics of photography, I used my P&S again and the images comes out nicely (other than the noise bit).

    The difference? The technique/settings you apply. If you shoot nightscapes with a P&S at high ISO and long shutter speed (1/10 or even longer), almost anything will come out horrible due to handshake.

    Maybe TS should make sure that it's the limits of the camera before thinking of getting a new purchase. Just my $0.02.


    *Thou I did not regret much jumping on to the DSLR ship*
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  8. #8

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Hey all! Oh gosh, there's so much help given and i'm extremely grateful.

    Okay the camera I said that takes horrible photos at night is a Olympus FE-5500 camera. If I don't use flash, handshake will destroy the photo and there's alot of (i'm not sure if its the right term) noise in the photo. And on the other hand when i turn on the flash, it gets really harsh photos, like making the subject really white and unnatural and the background is all black only.

    Another camera which i mostly rely on would be my Iphone camera, it usually turns out quite decent just that its bad at macro shots and controlling the focus is slow and its hard to control.

    One eye Jack - Sorry that I didn't give enough information at the start, my first time in a forum like this x) I heard about the RAW format thing and the editing with photoshop and lightroom thing from a friend but that means i'll have to get a DSLR first right? I'm kinda apprehensive about getting it cause there's alot of other MISC costs which are incurred just to enter the DSLR world right (haha read up and they said i'll need to get a dry box, the lens cleaning stuffs, an external flash, and at least another is it 18-50mm lens or something like that). By the way, what is F stop and electronic stabalisation?

    Rhino 123 - I was looking at a prosumer camera (i'm using the term loosely cause i'm not exactly sure what falls into this category. Is it those which you can adjust the ISO, shutter speed and all that through a menu in the cam?), or perhaps try the mirrorless format. Are there any recommendations which I should go check out? cause many people all say its up to the user's preference, but the market is just so huge and i'm not sure where to start looking/comparing.


    In general, how do i improve my night shots with the Olympus camera? I really do feel like smashing it at times. Even after setting the ISO higher, handshake does kill the photo and it usually appears grainy and stuff like that.

  9. #9
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    3,443

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Okay the camera I said that takes horrible photos at night is a Olympus FE-5500 camera
    Just checked out the specs of ur current camera. http://www.dpreview.com/news/0502/05021709oly_d630.asp. Judging from the specs, I can roughly understand your situation...(been thru almost the same thing).

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    If I don't use flash, handshake will destroy the photo and there's alot of (i'm not sure if its the right term) noise in the photo. And on the other hand when i turn on the flash, it gets really harsh photos, like making the subject really white and unnatural and the background is all black only.

    Another camera which i mostly rely on would be my Iphone camera, it usually turns out quite decent just that its bad at macro shots and controlling the focus is slow and its hard to control.

    One eye Jack - Sorry that I didn't give enough information at the start, my first time in a forum like this x) I heard about the RAW format thing and the editing with photoshop and lightroom thing from a friend but that means i'll have to get a DSLR first right? I'm kinda apprehensive about getting it cause there's alot of other MISC costs which are incurred just to enter the DSLR world right (haha read up and they said i'll need to get a dry box, the lens cleaning stuffs, an external flash, and at least another is it 18-50mm lens or something like that). By the way, what is F stop and electronic stabalisation?
    Taking it step by step
    - Flash
    Most inbuilt flash of P&S will give quite harsh photos as the flash exposure cannot be adjusted (to what I know). Unless you can diffuse it somehow...

    - RAW
    There are some Prosumer Cameras available now that allows you to shoot Raw as well, so it's not just limited to DSLR/SLT/Mirrorless etc.

    - 18-55 Lens
    This is one of the common kit lens that comes with DSLR kits. You can also choose not to get kits and get a body only where you can buy your own lens elsewhere. For beginners, this lens is one of the most recommended one.

    - F Stop
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-number

    - Electronic stabilization
    I think you mean Image Stabilizer? in layman terms, It's a system to reduce handshake. But there is a limit to how much handshake it can reduce, meaning if you shake too much, the image is still screwed.


    Getting a DSLR System, additional stuffs you may need (other than DSLR)?
    - Lens: There are a wide variety of lens to pick. So every of them may suit different purpose. It's normal to end up with more than the kit lens. So I guess this will come under "additional stuffs" cost is ranging from 0 to infinite :P Some can last with a 18-200 and no more upgrades required. Some collect lens like collectibles ("Collect 'em all")
    - Dry Cabinet: imo, It's a must buy to keep your lens more safe from Fungus.
    - Tripod: Esp if you are going to macro
    - Flash: Good to have if you are going macro/portraits/events
    - Cleaning Kit: I guess a blower and microfiber cloth would suffice at the moment

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Rhino 123 - I was looking at a prosumer camera (i'm using the term loosely cause i'm not exactly sure what falls into this category. Is it those which you can adjust the ISO, shutter speed and all that through a menu in the cam?), or perhaps try the mirrorless format. Are there any recommendations which I should go check out? cause many people all say its up to the user's preference, but the market is just so huge and i'm not sure where to start looking/comparing.
    imo, the G12, S95, LX5 are pretty solid prosumer cameras that allows you to tweak many settings. If you are keen to get a DSLR instead, you can read up the stickies in the forum: "what dslr to get"

    You can also readup reviews on websites like dpreview or the-digital-picture.com etc. (A camera is not just all about specs, there are other factors that matter more)


    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    In general, how do i improve my night shots with the Olympus camera? I really do feel like smashing it at times. Even after setting the ISO higher, handshake does kill the photo and it usually appears grainy and stuff like that.
    I'm sorry, this model only allows 2sec shutter speed at the longest. Many night scenery will require more than 2 sec. For taking night portraits (without the harsh lighting), your best bet is either get a prosumer camera that allow tweaking of flash exposure or a camera that can utilize external flash. (proper techniques are required too!)


    Hope this helps...

    If I've made any mistake in the post, please correct me
    Last edited by SkyStrike; 12th June 2011 at 02:13 PM.
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  10. #10
    Senior Member bonrya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    In a mobile cage
    Posts
    2,633

    Default

    On face value I'll always recommend the canon powershot s95. Why? I wanna get one myself. Hehehehehe
    My Flickr
    ~Neko baka

  11. #11

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Hi Jeremy,
    I have to admit FE5500 is basic by today's standard when most P&S cameras are 10MP to 16MP.But don't give up just yet.What you must master now
    is how to hold your camera.People think this is intuitive but not so.To get a shake free picture even for DSLR, brace your arms against the sides of your body,since your LCD screen is the only way to confirm focus it has to be away from your face unlike a camera that has a viewfinder as well.Next just before you take a picture,take a deep breath and hold,gently squeeze the shutter trigger.If the situation allows, a wall or some other solid object to lean against helps.Other than that
    a tripod will be your best friend.The maximum ISO is 320,try it or maybe you already did.Don't just use P mode (program mode,idiot proof) try other scene modes.

    P&S prosumer cameras are not cheap either unless you want portability and stealth/street shooting and it's still a 1/2 inch or 12.5mm image sensor.I rather spend it on a DSLR.Bite the bullet and no regrets.PS download the advanced manual from olympus japan if it's not already in the cd.
    Last edited by one eye jack; 12th June 2011 at 02:59 PM.

  12. #12
    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NA
    Posts
    5,247

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Rhino 123 - I was looking at a prosumer camera (i'm using the term loosely cause i'm not exactly sure what falls into this category. Is it those which you can adjust the ISO, shutter speed and all that through a menu in the cam?), or perhaps try the mirrorless format. Are there any recommendations which I should go check out? cause many people all say its up to the user's preference, but the market is just so huge and i'm not sure where to start looking/comparing.
    Like what others said, it is all up to your own preferences when selecting a camera, be it prosumer or mirrorless or SLT or DSLR.

    The main advantage of the abovementioned are,

    1) Prosumer - having slightly larger sensor as compared to the rest of the P&S, most of them have some form of manual control (you can control ISO, aperture and shutter speed) and many of them have hot shoes for external flashes and other accessories such as digital viewfinder, etc). They are not really cheap but is small and very portable. More notable prosumer cameras in the market was the Canon's G12, S95 (this one don't have hot shoe), Nikon's P7000, Olympus's XZ-1, Panasonic's LX5.

    2) Mirrorless - these cameras are designed as compact camera with APS-C or micro 4/3 sensor. Which mean they take very close DSLR standard's photos while having the size of prosumer camera (a bit bigger in some cases). The main problem is, they aren't as fast as real DSLR, and might have suffer from some shutter lag. The more notable ones are Olympus's PEN series (micro 4/3), Panasonic G and GH series (micro 4/3), Samsung NX series (APS-C) and Sony's NEX series (APS-C).

    3) SLT - well... this is Sony's patented design and up till now there are two members in this family - A33 and A55 (soon there will be a couple more - A77 and A35), basically they are speed demon especially the A55... excellent photo quality. They are small compared to a DSLR, but big compared to the mirrorless.

    4) DSLR - these are full size DSLR, normally came in three forms, entry-level, semi-pro and professional level. They took excellent photo, can be very fast and was also very versatile. But they are quite heavy to being with.

    So by looking at the abovementioned, you would need to ask yourself which category do you actually want to go into. Only after choosing those that you could actually decide to look further into what brands of the camera you would want to buy.

    I would say that all these cameras are built for what they are designed for, and all of them are good... there are no one brand that is better than the other and please forget about DXOmark or lab or something like that. They did the test in a lab, and frankly I wouldn't trust them too much. Read the reviews of each camera that you have zoomed in, then go to the shops and test them out. The most important factor was that you feel comfortable when holding and shooting with the camera, do note the following,

    a) ergonomic,
    b) weigh and size
    c) button layout
    d) user interface
    e) cost

    As to the number of lens available and stuff like that... I think it is pretty secondary... for example... Canon and Nikon had the largest collection of lens available in the market, but you ain't going to buy all of them. You just need a few... or maybe even one (depending on what you would like to shoot).

    As to how to improve your night shots... well I have not really handle Olympus FE-5500 camera before and do not know the extend of the controls. But you could invest in a cheap tripod, use the tripod to steady your camera, then use very slow shutter speed to take the photo. That way you do not need a flash and still get pretty sharp pic. As to how to diffuse your flash, there are a couple of way you could actually play around with. The first is to use a miramat sheet (those thing that came with your expensive handbag and stuff like that, tied it over your flash or use a sticky tape to tape it over your flash... it should help to diffuse the flash... you could even use a cardboard to direct your flash to shoot at area you want.

  13. #13
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    3,443

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    I hope this thread doesn't turns into mirrorless vs non-mirrorless or EVF vs OVF.
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  14. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    3,443

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by rhino123 View Post
    I would say that all these cameras are built for what they are designed for, and all of them are good... there are no one brand that is better than the other and please forget about DXOmark or lab or something like that. They did the test in a lab, and frankly I wouldn't trust them too much. Read the reviews of each camera that you have zoomed in, then go to the shops and test them out.
    Just to support on this point: http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/About
    Quoted from DxOMark: "DxOMark focuses only on image quality performance but does not cover many other criteria that are important when looking for cameras or lenses that fit your needs."
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  15. #15

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    hmm considering the fact that Compact Cameras at the prosumer level are similar in pricing to entry level DSLRs, it might be better to choose a DSLR as they'll always give better control over noise. night shots will look better at high ISO like the 800 - 3200 range. the only trade off is the size. NOW, with Mirrorless, you can have DSLR quality images in a compact body.

    and please, proponents of Mirrorless (and somehow it's always "no i didn't recommend Samsung. don't put words in my mouth"), don't turn this into another Mirrorless vs DSLR war. we understand your enthusiasm, but it's better used shooting than typing in here.

    Micro 4/3 cameras are not really known for their good control of high ISO, and neither is the Samsung NX series. it's only slightly better than the Micro 4/3 even though they use a larger sensor. the current best control of noise still lies with the Sony NEX if you're talking about having more control over shooting, but would prefer a compact body.

  16. #16
    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NA
    Posts
    5,247

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Yeah. I hope I didn't lure in any mirrorless vs DSLR arguement to this thread... and also hope that I didn't get people into which brand produce better image quality as compare to the other too

    I have experience all three types of interchangeable lens category (minus away the medium frame format) - DSLR (extensively with my 1000D, then 40D and finally 7D), mirrorless format (quite extensively with my Olympus EP-L1) and SLT (briefly with my friend's A55). I could say that I love them all! I agreed with Kei that EP-L1 is not excellent in noise control over high ISO... but I rarely step beyond ISO 400 (actually I couldn't remember doing that), in low light or night shooting, I always use a tripod.

    Anyway, to TS. You can have the best cameras there is... you cannot shoot good photos unless you have more experience and learn the correct techniques (not that i am an expert or what, I am still a noob).

  17. #17
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Universe
    Posts
    5,991

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Hey I'm looking for an all purpose general camera cause the current one I have takes horrible photos at night.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera that is good at macro shots and portraits ( like the photo will catch the natural skin tone, rather than it always turning out very harsh with flash and all)

    Budget isn't that much of a concern .

    Btw what is the view on the new NEX camera by Sony?
    A lot of cameras are good at macro shots, portraits.

    A larger sensor will allow you greater control over depth of field, so that's what you have to decide: FF, APS-C, M4/3 or P&S small size sensor. Not everyone really needs shallow DOF. For example, street photography works fine with small size sensors to get everything sharply in focus even with relatively larger apertures.

    As for "photo catching natural skin tone with no harsh flash", that has more to do with your understand of how flashes work. Even with the popup flash, you can diffuse it somewhat to reduce the amount of harsh shadows. With external flashes and slave flashes you can attain a number of lighting effects.

    So you'd have to be clearer about what you want. What do you mean by "horrible photos at night"? It may not necessarily be something that is solveable with buying a new camera. For all you know, it could be your limited knowledge limiting the potential of your current camera, and then you'd be throwing money unnecessarily at gear thinking that it'd help when the problem is you.

  18. #18
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Universe
    Posts
    5,991

    Default Re: Normal camera recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyymerej View Post
    Hey all! Oh gosh, there's so much help given and i'm extremely grateful.

    Okay the camera I said that takes horrible photos at night is a Olympus FE-5500 camera. If I don't use flash, handshake will destroy the photo and there's alot of (i'm not sure if its the right term) noise in the photo. And on the other hand when i turn on the flash, it gets really harsh photos, like making the subject really white and unnatural and the background is all black only.
    You could try to diffuse the flash somewhat.

    Alternatively, just get a entry level DSLR with external flash and learn some flash techniques, or most mirrorless cameras coupled with a firm grounding in photographic knowledge would allow you to get the results you want. Admittedly, the FE-5500 can be quite limiting - it's a ultracompact with little manual functionality, which means you have to listen to it most of the time.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •