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Thread: Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX Aspherical DG RF

  1. #1

    Default Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX Aspherical DG RF

    Any one of you have use Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX Aspherical DG RF lens before. Care to comment...

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANEWUSER
    Any one of you have use Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX Aspherical DG RF lens before. Care to comment...
    It's BIG!
    It's heavy!
    Its filters (82mm) are hard to find
    Its filters (82mm) are expensive
    It's prone to flare even with its hood attached
    Its images are sharp from 2.8
    It's useable in digital (APS & Full Frame) as well as film
    It has virtually no distortion
    Its images are contrasty and colors are warm
    It's a lens that I like

    I like the Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 for its size but preferred the photos from the Sigma 20mm f/1.8 EX DG ASP.

    Two small sample shots here:





    The large ones are available here:

    http://www.pbase.com/deadpixel/image/33581310/original

    http://www.pbase.com/deadpixel/image/33581955/original

    Cheers,

    Matt

  3. #3

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    Thanks Matt, but personally what do you recommend for between the two that you mentioned. BTW know of anyway that sell them at a reasonable price.

  4. #4

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    Which mount are you looking at?
    Great photography is about depth of feeling, not depth of field.
    Portfolio | Gallery

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANEWUSER
    Thanks Matt, but personally what do you recommend for between the two that you mentioned. BTW know of anyway that sell them at a reasonable price.
    Hmm, I'll assume that you're using the Nikon System since your question refers to the Nikkor 20mm and Sigma 20mm that I mentioned.

    About the Nikkor, it is very small and very light, you won't even know it's there (sounds like a tampon ad), but will serve as a good walk-about lens. It has very decent images wide-opened and is very sharp from 5.6 onwards (sweet spot at 8). Colors aren't as warm as the Sigma's and it does suffer from more distortion than the Sigma, however, it has less of a problem with flare.

    The Sigma is very much heavier and very much bigger (about 3x more), but is sharp from 2.8 (images are soft at the edges at 1.8 so I tend to avoid using it below 2.8). It's colors are warmer than the Nikkor's and IMHO I find it to give better contrast too (I found this to be so with the 105mm macro lenses as well). With almost no distortions this is a good lens for shooting buildings. My major gripe is its problem with flare.

    In terms of pricing, the Nikkor is about 1.5x more expensive but that wasn't a factor in my going with the Sigma. I spent a month comparing images taken by others and myself (borrowed the lenses from friends) and found that I was leaning more towards those taken with the Sigma.

    As to where you can get them at reasonable prices, you might want to check with J3:16, MS and CP (yes, CP has started selling Sigma again). Their prices vary by only a few dollars so go with the one that gives you the best service.

    2nd hand? I rarely see it being put up for sale.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  6. #6

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    Thanks Matt. Since you mentioned about 2nd hand, may I know how to determine if a 2nd hand lens is in good conduction. I think I saw a lens at Camera Workshop but hold back as I am not very sure it is in good conduction.

  7. #7

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    A lens I love very much, in fact the best among my lenses. Suits digital very well. Have a look at some picture from my galleries... and evaluate them yourself

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANEWUSER
    Thanks Matt. Since you mentioned about 2nd hand, may I know how to determine if a 2nd hand lens is in good conduction. I think I saw a lens at Camera Workshop but hold back as I am not very sure it is in good conduction.
    1. Make sure there are no scratches or smudges on the front and rear elements

    2. Open the lens' aperture completely and look through it at some light source. Make sure there aren't any fungi in the lens and that there are no large dirt particles, tiny dust spacks are ok though.

    3. Examine the manual focusing ring, be sure that it isn't too loose.

    4. Check the aperture ring, it should click smoothly into each apature setting and be able to hold its position. Also, make sure that the max aperture lock is working.

    5. Attach it to your camera, take a few shots at various apertures and check the results, preferrably on a proper monitor.

    If it passes all the above, your only concern will then be the price.

    Cheers,

    Matt

  9. #9

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    I do like to find if it is true that Sigma lens tent to degrade after some time. I have read that from one of the thread.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANEWUSER
    I do like to find if it is true that Sigma lens tent to degrade after some time. I have read that from one of the thread.
    Maybe the user got a prototype biodegradable model...

    The truth of the matter is that ALL lenses degrade over time, particularly if you abuse them or ignore them and do not take good care of them. Think of you lenses as you would a pet dog, even it would grow weak and sickly if you lock it in a room all the time and do not take it out. It's good to keep lenses in dry cabinets but you must bring them out and shoot with them once-in-a-while to keep them functioning well.

    I have a couple of old Sigma MF lenses from way back when I was shooting with the F3 and they are still sharp. The truth is that Sigma is quickly catching up with the big boys but then there are those who are blinded by pride and loyalty.

  11. #11

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    Thks all for the advice.

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