Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Common Practice

  1. #1

    Default Common Practice

    Hi,

    Is collecting a deposit a common practice for any forms of assignments?
    If yes, how many percent deposit do you normally charge?
    Also, do you normally have a hard time to get clients to pay on time?

    Thanks again.

    JS

  2. #2

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Hi,

    There are 2 types of common practices...

    One is the right one so photographer can enjoy their work and clients get more than what they are paying for.
    Second is the not the ideal type, where Photographers generally get frustrated and clients get what they are paying for.

    Type 1, generally, employ by establish Photographers who understand their work (I mean skill set and business)
    1. Understand the objectives of the work (work scope)
    2. Contracts (can be a simple contract) to cover aspect of their work
    3. Getting paid before or on the day of the session or part of it.
    4. Deliver as promise and perhaps more.

    Type 2, "rush to get the job" type
    1. Don't fully understand the objectives
    2. Don't communicate contract for job scope in writing
    3. Don't get paid before or weeks even months after the work is completed

    So it really, depends on what you are trying to do really...

    The type I generally do have potential of losing the assignment because clients doesn't understand what they want nor willing to discuss to scope.

    Type II, generally, gets the job and the process is a pain and no one enjoy it.


    For my simple portrait work, I get paid in advance for my time to so the session and it covers my post-production work as well.

    If a commercial job, which involve large sum, generally will get 50% for doing the job in advance and 50% on delivery of the job as promise.

    Of course, these are not set in the stone, so flexibility is given for genuine work.

    I hope that explains the "common practice".

    Regards,

    Hart

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    481

    Default Re: Common Practice

    I collect deposit to ensure that the client is serious in engaging my service. It reduces incidents of cancellations.

    Depending on what you meant by on time and what types of client (corporate, individual, not-for-profit), the deposit does help, in my experience, in reducing the 'chasing' of payment. You have to set your credit terms (if any).

  4. #4
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,656
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Agetan View Post
    Hi,

    There are 2 types of common practices...

    One is the right one so photographer can enjoy their work and clients get more than what they are paying for.
    Second is the not the ideal type, where Photographers generally get frustrated and clients get what they are paying for.

    Type 1, generally, employ by establish Photographers who understand their work (I mean skill set and business)
    1. Understand the objectives of the work (work scope)
    2. Contracts (can be a simple contract) to cover aspect of their work
    3. Getting paid before or on the day of the session or part of it.
    4. Deliver as promise and perhaps more.

    Type 2, "rush to get the job" type
    1. Don't fully understand the objectives
    2. Don't communicate contract for job scope in writing
    3. Don't get paid before or weeks even months after the work is completed

    So it really, depends on what you are trying to do really...

    The type I generally do have potential of losing the assignment because clients doesn't understand what they want nor willing to discuss to scope.

    Type II, generally, gets the job and the process is a pain and no one enjoy it.


    For my simple portrait work, I get paid in advance for my time to so the session and it covers my post-production work as well.

    If a commercial job, which involve large sum, generally will get 50% for doing the job in advance and 50% on delivery of the job as promise.

    Of course, these are not set in the stone, so flexibility is given for genuine work.

    I hope that explains the "common practice".

    Regards,

    Hart
    just curious, what if fail to deliver?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart View Post
    just curious, what if fail to deliver?
    That's why the big jobs have clauses in regards to force majeure and limits of liabilities in their contracts.

    Edit to add: Even 'smaller jobs' or rather jobs for non-commercial private clients like weddings, also will set limits of liability.
    Last edited by sjackal; 20th May 2011 at 09:45 PM.
    WTB Manfrotto RC4 L Bracket

  6. #6
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Quote Originally Posted by lay9eggs View Post
    Hi,

    Is collecting a deposit a common practice for any forms of assignments?
    If yes, how many percent deposit do you normally charge?
    Also, do you normally have a hard time to get clients to pay on time?

    Thanks again.

    JS
    Yes,
    collect deposit is a must,
    if you are doing a business,
    I don't see any problem of collecting deposit from customers
    it will give your customers assurance too

    dealing with new client, make it a point to discuss payment term before you commit yourself to the job, if they avoid the discussion, it is a good indicator you should avoid them.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  7. #7

    Default Re: Common Practice

    If one has fail to deliver in mind, should not be a Pro.

    Also, not taking an assignment beyond your own capability reduce the chance of non delivery.

    Hart

  8. #8
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Yes, agreed with Hart,

    if some jobs are not your cup of tea, it is better to refer to someone else.
    don't take your clients as guinea pig.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  9. #9
    Senior Member blueskye168's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    AVPS
    Posts
    2,874

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Well, the best common practice for me is to 30%-45% deposit ( a MUST, no "Compromise"...!! ) in this way, having adopt 'it' as a "Standard" form of reflecting your biz management and somehow enhanced your biz's image at the same time too!! Not for getting the 'Assurance' your clients/customers 'feels/received'...benifits both parties in this case

    As to whether or not a Photographer's abilities to deliver/produce the final output ( which is really really up to individuals ethics and attitude.....But please do not spoil your own image and reputation by accepting an assignment that you have not even "Learn/Practice"-on yourself before - Just a gentle reminder: It's easy to spoil ones reputation but certainly not easy to "Re-build" from where it was "Tarnished"...!!!
    Anything that can take pictures...happy already lor...(..but...Hasselblad_H5D-50 as my Workhorse)

  10. #10

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Thanks to all for your generous sharing. I have been thinking of diving in for a long time. Too long! Your information has been very helpful. Appreciate your time.

    JS

  11. #11

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Quote Originally Posted by lay9eggs View Post
    Thanks to all for your generous sharing. I have been thinking of diving in for a long time. Too long! Your information has been very helpful. Appreciate your time.

    JS
    then what are you waiting for? life is too short

    hart

  12. #12

    Default Re: Common Practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Agetan View Post
    then what are you waiting for? life is too short

    hart
    Some equation is harder to define. But leaning towards it! Thanks Hart.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •