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Thread: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

  1. #1

    Default Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Hi guys,

    I have been taking photos as a hobby for a while,
    Mainly taking personal photos for family events, weddings and random stuff on streets.

    Will like to venture more into studio/lighting photography
    But i have no idea on where to start.
    Im currently using a 7D mostly paired with Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 as my walkabout lens.

    Any advices, on what beginners lighting kit to get?
    Will really appreciate if web links are provided.

    Budget is not really the problem, but I hope to get a basic necessity kit for home studio usage.

    Some of my noob photos are in http://www.flickr.com/photos/raytwm84/

    Thanks for reading

  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    don't know where to start? why don't check out studio photography courses in the Workshops, Tutorials and Classes, after attend couples of courses, asking questions face to face, with hands on experience, you will know what you really need.

    if you want to save the money on courses, you can go National library to borrow some books on studio photography, plus watching some tutorials in Youtube, and online research, you will also able to archive your goal, but slightly longer and not systematic.

    hope this help.
    Last edited by catchlights; 10th May 2011 at 05:52 PM.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  3. #3

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    This is for family members or for people you don't know?
    A strobist kit may all you need in many cases, unless you want to do serious studio stuff.

    http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html

  4. #4

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Thanks for the advice catchlight,

    pinholecam, I will like to turn serious eventually

    Any recommendation on any starter kit?

  5. #5
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default

    What is your budget?

  6. #6
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asidie
    Thanks for the advice catchlight,

    pinholecam, I will like to turn serious eventually

    Any recommendation on any starter kit?
    Some serious professionals also use strobist setups.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by asidie View Post
    Thanks for the advice catchlight,

    pinholecam, I will like to turn serious eventually

    Any recommendation on any starter kit?
    Strobist kit can be used seriously or non-seriously
    However, it can be a bit more of a pain if you are looking at faster cycle times and flash power, as well as compatibility to studio flash mounts in softboxes, octobox, etc.

    I'm just a causal photographer, who watches over my wallet (or like to think that I am ),
    coverage is just family portraits, some TFCD and some events, all for interest sake, so a strobist kit with the following is good enough for me :
    x1 radio flash trigger transmitter
    x4 radio flash trigger receivers
    x3 umbrellas (mix of shoot through and bounce)
    x4 hot-shoe flash units (around GN46 (@ISO100) if not better)
    x1 3-way reflector
    x4 light stands (or make do with a tripod or two)
    x1 softbox (mainly in-door use)

    Try to have similar flash units if possible. Makes it less of a pain over light ratios.
    My few cents.

  8. #8
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinholecam

    Strobist kit can be used seriously or non-seriously
    However, it can be a bit more of a pain if you are looking at faster cycle times and flash power, as well as compatibility to studio flash mounts in softboxes, octobox, etc.

    I'm just a causal photographer, who watches over my wallet (or like to think that I am ),
    coverage is just family portraits, some TFCD and some events, all for interest sake, so a strobist kit with the following is good enough for me :
    x1 radio flash trigger transmitter
    x4 radio flash trigger receivers
    x3 umbrellas (mix of shoot through and bounce)
    x4 hot-shoe flash units (around GN46 (@ISO100) if not better)
    x1 3-way reflector
    x4 light stands (or make do with a tripod or two)
    x1 softbox (mainly in-door use)

    Try to have similar flash units if possible. Makes it less of a pain over light ratios.
    My few cents.
    Actually for a start, two receivers will be enough. The rest can fire via optical slave.

    Classic portraits are usually 3 light, one key, reflector to fill, one rim and one background. The rim or background can fire optically also.

    That is a good way to start, especially for a beginner.

    Learn about the basic lighting positions first like edge, 45/45 and butterfly first.

    Take it a step at a time.
    Last edited by daredevil123; 11th May 2011 at 11:49 AM.

  9. #9
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    super old school traditional classical portrait using FIVE lights,

    one Key
    one Fill
    one kicker
    one hair
    one background

    all on Reflectors, no softbox
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  10. #10
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    super old school traditional classical portrait using FIVE lights,

    one Key
    one Fill
    one kicker
    one hair
    one background

    all on Reflectors, no softbox
    That one is old school studio sia. Must accompany with hydraulic camera stand.
    Last edited by daredevil123; 11th May 2011 at 02:43 PM.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Thanks for the advices guys.

    Im using 7D, I don't really need a receiver if im using speedlite right?


    x1 radio flash trigger transmitter
    x4 radio flash trigger receivers
    x3 umbrellas (mix of shoot through and bounce)
    x4 hot-shoe flash units (around GN46 (@ISO100) if not better)
    x1 3-way reflector
    x4 light stands (or make do with a tripod or two)
    x1 softbox (mainly in-door use)

    And how much will this roughly cost?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by asidie View Post
    Thanks for the advices guys.

    Im using 7D, I don't really need a receiver if im using speedlite right?


    x1 radio flash trigger transmitter
    x4 radio flash trigger receivers
    x3 umbrellas (mix of shoot through and bounce)
    x4 hot-shoe flash units (around GN46 (@ISO100) if not better)
    x1 3-way reflector
    x4 light stands (or make do with a tripod or two)
    x1 softbox (mainly in-door use)

    And how much will this roughly cost?
    Just note that I am advising 4 receivers cause I am using cheapo PT-04 v2 (ie. china triggers) and these are not compatible every time they come up with a new version.
    If you get good ones (eg. Alien Bees, Pocket Wizards, etc) you won't have a future compatibility issue.
    The 'china triggers' are cheap though.

    Check out mass sales to mix and match what you need.
    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/forums/84-Mass-Sales

    Some of the stuff like 3-4 flash, umbrellas, softbox you can slowly add up once you get more comfortable with you setups.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Help in Studio/Lighting Photography

    Share my experience...

    I tested indoor shooting with 2 x desk lamp + home-made reflector (made by mounting board wrap with aluminum foil, additional to my 580EX II speedlite on the cam horse-mount.
    This setup help me to experiment the aperture, shuttle speed and ISO combination, and the light bounce (shadowing the subject).

    After knowing the combination, I get another speedlite + mode-made reflector.
    I didn't get pinholecam's recommendation, which most people will, because I prefer Canon ETTL to auto adjust (amateur level).

    One book to recommend.
    BASICS Photography (2): Lighting
    by David Prakel
    ISBN 13: 978-2-940373-03-1
    ISBN 10: 2-940373-03-5

    I bought it from Photography Bookstore at Funan Lobby.

Bookmarks

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