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Thread: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

  1. #1

    Default Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    If so, is there a way to rectify this problem?? Or are we supposed to do post processing to the image all the time so as to remove the vignetting?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by Falcon
    If so, is there a way to rectify this problem?? Or are we supposed to do post processing to the image all the time so as to remove the vignetting?
    For the cheaper ones, i think u have to expect some vignetting or at most full zoom with no vignetting. Heard that the Olympus B300 gives a pretty wide range of zoom without vignetting but it costs a bomb.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by xdivider


    For the cheaper ones, i think u have to expect some vignetting or at most full zoom with no vignetting. Heard that the Olympus B300 gives a pretty wide range of zoom without vignetting but it costs a bomb.
    That is this guy at AP who told me that even for B300, you have to zoom in all the way to avoid vignetting. How true is that? If so, then wouldn't that limits the flexiblity of the zoom capability. It has actually become a prime lens.

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    Default Re: Re: Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by Falcon


    That is this guy at AP who told me that even for B300, you have to zoom in all the way to avoid vignetting. How true is that? If so, then wouldn't that limits the flexiblity of the zoom capability. It has actually become a prime lens.
    depends on the camera lens. on some, there may just be minimal vignetting at full wide position.
    Last edited by mpenza; 22nd June 2002 at 10:53 PM.
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    Default Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by Falcon
    If so, is there a way to rectify this problem?? Or are we supposed to do post processing to the image all the time so as to remove the vignetting?
    Falcon, it depends entirely on the teleconverter and lens being used.
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by Ian


    Falcon, it depends entirely on the teleconverter and lens being used.
    Tks. You mean some teleconverters won't cause vignetting if used with certain cameras. I was told that all will by the guy at AP. So normally you will just zoom all the way just to avoid vignetting(if there is any) rite?

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    Default Re: Re: Re: Will all teleconverters cause vignetting

    Originally posted by Falcon


    Tks. You mean some teleconverters won't cause vignetting if used with certain cameras. I was told that all will by the guy at AP. So normally you will just zoom all the way just to avoid vignetting(if there is any) rite?
    Ian might be referring to teleconverters for SLRs. those fit between the lens and the camera body.

    the ones used on the digital cameras are fitted in front of the camera lens. if you get one with a rear element bigger than the lens thread, you might not get any vignetting. I think one of the 62mm 1.45x Olympus teleconverters for the E10/E20 would fit the bill.
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  8. #8
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    As Ian said, it depends very much on the exact teleconverter and lens combination you are talking about, and mpenza pointed out that one of the major indicators is the relative lens thread sizes of the two components.

    However, since you are talking about zoom lenses, it is usually the case that a certain percentage of the wide angle end of the zoom range will show observable vignetting. In my opinion, this is a pretty acceptable trade-off, as long as you have some way (with or without the teleconverter lens) to obtain usable focal lengths in the range that you want.

    For example, if you have a 35-105mm 3x zoom lens (like many consumer digicams), and, say, a 1.7x teleconverter (the Olympus B300 referred to above). This teleconverter will effectively turn your lens into a 60-180mm 3x zoom lens. However, let's say you get vignetting at the lower 50% of the zoom range with your teleconverter, i.e. from 60-120mm. In this case, however, you still have plenty of options: 35-105mm without the teleconverter, and 120-180mm with it. You are left only without the ability to reach a narrow band of focal lengths in between (105-120mm), which you probably won't miss. Hence vignetting, although present, does not pose an actual problem because you can work around the focal lengths where it occurs.

    Btw the numbers above are just hypothetical. Best thing to do is to test out the teleconverter with your own lens, and make your decision accordingly. Don't forget also the other factors involved in evaluating a teleconverter lens, not the least of which is image quality (no point having a 5x blurred image). Just some food for thought.

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