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Thread: ND filter for night landscape?

  1. #1

    Default ND filter for night landscape?

    Hi guys,

    I wanna use ND filter for night landscape over Singapore river to smoothen the River over long exposure.

    Q. Will I degrade my lens IQ and eventually my image quality if I use ND filter for this situation?
    Do advice.
    Many Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    not sure about image quality, personally don't see any degradation to my image let alone degrading my lens even with the cheap tianya ND filter but there is a heavy colour cast that I find it difficult or near impossible to remove.
    Coolthought - 冷静思考 - クールだ http://xaa.xanga.com/0aba0666d143253.../t35917343.gif

  3. #3
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    not sure about image quality, personally don't see any degradation to my image let alone degrading my lens even with the cheap tianya ND filter but there is a heavy colour cast that I find it difficult or near impossible to remove.
    mine doesn't have that much color cast leh.

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    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    BTW TS, you do not need ND to get long exposure at night. unless you have a flood light pointing at you.

  5. #5

    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    not sure about image quality, personally don't see any degradation to my image let alone degrading my lens even with the cheap tianya ND filter but there is a heavy colour cast that I find it difficult or near impossible to remove.
    Thanks for info =D




    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    BTW TS, you do not need ND to get long exposure at night. unless you have a flood light pointing at you.
    Thanks for advised, will try it without the ND filter.

  6. #6

    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ahtim78 View Post
    Hi guys,

    I wanna use ND filter for night landscape over Singapore river to smoothen the River over long exposure.

    Q. Will I degrade my lens IQ and eventually my image quality if I use ND filter for this situation?
    Do advice.
    Many Thanks.

    You shouldn't be needing any ND filter. At night, just use lowest ISO (50?) and whack the aperture to something like f16.....you'll definitely get a very long exposure. Most people use ND filters for the daytime.

  7. #7
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by eulee View Post
    You shouldn't be needing any ND filter. At night, just use lowest ISO (50?) and whack the aperture to something like f16.....you'll definitely get a very long exposure. Most people use ND filters for the daytime.
    Not the lowest ISO... but base ISO. Tests has shown that if ISO is lowered below base ISO of the sensor, you actually lose details.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123

    Not the lowest ISO... but base ISO. Tests has shown that if ISO is lowered below base ISO of the sensor, you actually lose details.
    Hoo... Didn't know that. Now i learn something new. =D

  9. #9
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    If you want your landscape exposure to be oppressively long :P
    I have seen one that was done overnight exposure on film with ND filter, and it turned out like day.

    Otherwise usually a smaller aperture with lower ISO should do the trick

    Ryan

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123

    Not the lowest ISO... but base ISO. Tests has shown that if ISO is lowered below base ISO of the sensor, you actually lose details.
    Ok that's something new to me. Thanks! Do you know where I can get more info on losing details? My thoughts on shooting lower than base (for canon, it's 100) is like post processing where you lower exposure by one stop. It's simulated. Except in this case it's done in camera. But in cases where I need to reduce shutter speed by a stop and I cannot reduce my aperture further, I'll resort to this.

    Good discussion!

  11. #11
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by eulee View Post
    Ok that's something new to me. Thanks! Do you know where I can get more info on losing details? My thoughts on shooting lower than base (for canon, it's 100) is like post processing where you lower exposure by one stop. It's simulated. Except in this case it's done in camera. But in cases where I need to reduce shutter speed by a stop and I cannot reduce my aperture further, I'll resort to this.

    Good discussion!
    lowering exposure in PP, and shooting at lower exposure are 2 different things all together. And you will get different results. In landscape photography, there is a technique called "Exposing to the right", which I use very often. It is to purposely overexpose the scene (but not blow the highlights) only to pull it back in PP. This is best way to retain maximum details without blending multiple shots. I will not go into details here on the process but you can easily google for it.

    And the article about losing details when shooting below base ISO, is an article in dpreview a couple years back. The test was done on a D90. Have fun searching.
    Last edited by daredevil123; 26th April 2011 at 07:24 AM.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123

    lowering exposure in PP, and shooting at lower exposure are 2 different things all together. And you will get different results. In landscape photography, there is a technique called "Exposing to the right", which I use very often. It is to purposely overexpose the scene (but not blow the highlights) only to pull it back in PP. This is best way to retain maximum details without blending multiple shots. I will not go into details here on the process but you can easily google for it.

    And the article about losing details when shooting below base ISO, is an article in dpreview a couple years back. The test was done on a D90. Have fun searching.
    Good info thanks!

  13. #13

    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Hi
    Any idea about Fader ND filter ?

    Thanks
    Alok

  14. #14
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by aloks View Post
    Hi
    Any idea about Fader ND filter ?

    Thanks
    Alok
    Not something I will recommend. You will get problems like star banding at around 6 to 8 stops.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    It's good thing if you wish reduce 3 filters to 1. But careful on the last few stops.

  16. #16
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND filter for night landscape?

    Quote Originally Posted by aloks View Post
    Hi
    Any idea about Fader ND filter ?

    Thanks
    Alok
    you have the flexibility but you can't go to the maximum stops, depends on what focal length you are shooting.
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