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Thread: Birdie shots

  1. #61
    Member fmeeran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceL View Post
    New here. 1st posting too.

    If into birding, best to get..

    DX?? Cos 1.5/1.6 crop?

    Or FX? FF??

    Pro n Cons for the above?
    It's usually better to use DX for birding and wildlife photography where it is critical to have longer zooms.
    The super tele lenses go up exponentially in price for the longer zooms.
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  2. #62
    Member fmeeran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by fmeeran View Post
    It's usually better to use DX for birding and wildlife photography where it is critical to have longer zooms.
    The super tele lenses go up exponentially in price for the longer zooms.
    ... and weight.
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  3. #63

    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceL View Post
    New here. 1st posting too.

    If into birding, best to get..

    DX?? Cos 1.5/1.6 crop?

    Or FX? FF??

    Pro n Cons for the above?
    Quote Originally Posted by fmeeran View Post
    It's usually better to use DX for birding and wildlife photography where it is critical to have longer zooms.
    The super tele lenses go up exponentially in price for the longer zooms.... and weight.
    I think this way too. For the extra reach as in wildlife, always not enough de.

    Any Cons on DX for a $11-13K lens?
    Or anyone swear by FX in wildlife/birdie?

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceL View Post
    I think this way too. For the extra reach as in wildlife, always not enough de.

    Any Cons on DX for a $11-13K lens?
    Or anyone swear by FX in wildlife/birdie?
    I remember this question was asked a few pages b4. The main thing would be higher ISO handling when you need to shoot at fast shutter speed (above 1/500) but not enough light. DX grainy effect is more obvious at earlier higher ISO than FX camera.

  5. #65
    Member fmeeran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    I remember this question was asked a few pages b4. The main thing would be higher ISO handling when you need to shoot at fast shutter speed (above 1/500) but not enough light. DX grainy effect is more obvious at earlier higher ISO than FX camera.
    Hmm... I can see how that would be helpful if you are a pro. You'll more likely be sitting in a camouflaged hide waiting for the action. That'll make it easier to be closer to the subject.
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  6. #66
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceL View Post
    I think this way too. For the extra reach as in wildlife, always not enough de.

    Any Cons on DX for a $11-13K lens?
    Or anyone swear by FX in wildlife/birdie?

    Pro on DX: Longer reach.

    Cons: Slower focusing on low light condition (FX body are faster), ISO control not very good (but the current D7000 prove to be a better than D300/s in terms of ISO)

    I am using D700 for birding, i prefer longer reach but i prefer the picture effect on a full frame. Couple of friends preferred using D3s for birding as they say they can get more keepers than DX camera (faster response and focusing and better ISO). Some prefer 1Dmark4 than 7D because of speed, ISO and sharper photos.

  7. #67
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    An idea! Friend of mine was lucky: a bird built a nest right outside his window and at a right angle at that, he had a tinted window, i.e., on a bright day can't see in but can see out. So he took many nice shots. So how about a one way glass/plastic (say one side stuck with those glare reduction sheets), hide behind it, then on the other side set up a bird bath or feeding station to lure birds. Will work?

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Here are a few shots that I shot a few days ago with my Sigma 150-500 @ 500mm F/6.3
    Sigh, even at 500mm, the reach is not even close and I can't achieve good shutter speed. Bumping ISO ruins the picture quality, along with the slow shutter speed, it's a double hot to my image. Can anyone give me some advice?

    #1


    #2


    #3

  9. #69
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye
    Here are a few shots that I shot a few days ago with my Sigma 150-500 @ 500mm F/6.3
    Sigh, even at 500mm, the reach is not even close and I can't achieve good shutter speed. Bumping ISO ruins the picture quality, along with the slow shutter speed, it's a double hot to my image. Can anyone give me some advice?
    Actually not bad wor. I like the first (bee eater right) shot. Good job!

    You didn't tripod? Cannot expect the same result with those 10 times more expensive primes right?

  10. #70
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    Thanks unclefai, the first shot lucky. The bird was really really close. These shots here was handheld due to time and location constraint.

    My tripod was with me but my tripod shots are worse than these...
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  11. #71
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    Here are a few shots that I shot a few days ago with my Sigma 150-500 @ 500mm F/6.3
    Sigh, even at 500mm, the reach is not even close and I can't achieve good shutter speed. Bumping ISO ruins the picture quality, along with the slow shutter speed, it's a double hot to my image. Can anyone give me some advice?
    What is your setting? I am surprised that you say your photos are worse on tripod than on handheld. For zoom lens, stop down your aperature to F8. Turn off your IS when on tripod.

  12. #72
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye
    Thanks unclefai, the first shot lucky. The bird was really really close. These shots here was handheld due to time and location constraint.

    My tripod was with me but my tripod shots are worse than these...
    Tried using a TC?

    Anyway don't dishearten! 99% of my shots cannot make it also. That never stop me from trying coz I believe practice makes perfect. Keep at it. To me the joy in photography is seeing my own skill improve and shots getting better. I never aim to compare myself with those great photographers out there. Rather I seek to learn from them. It is the journey that's the fun part for us budget amateurs. The end result of course is nice to have but don't give yourself pressure. You don't need to sell your photo to a client under some deadline. So if no good, just try and try again lor.

  13. #73
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Thanks for all the encouragement.

    I'd purge all the raw files and I don't have a exif reader for these jpegs to get the shot info. But I remember it was wide open (F/6.3) due to the lighting, I tried to keep my ISO about 400 to 800 just enough to keep my shutter speed about 1/250 and above.

    I've a 1.4x extender but I forgot to bring it out that day (damn it). Haha, I find my shots (birdie shot at least) gets worse and worse. Probably it's because of my luck. I had closer birdie shots when I first got my bigma. These days with the hunting for birds issue I had before and the lack of reach due to physical limitation. The 3rd shot is an example, I was right across the drain when I took that shot. I can't blow this picture up anymore as it starts to eat into the IQ of the birdie... What a pity for such a nice (less often meet) Kingfisher.

    Oh, when I said my tripod shots are worse, it's because of the subject & lighting & my lousy composition, not the lens. Those subjects were further away and no matter how good the lens or tripod is. When nitpick starts coming in, I discarded a lot of shots.... Maybe I should make a trip to Jurong Bird Park to make myself feel better.

  14. #74
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    Oh, when I said my tripod shots are worse, it's because of the subject & lighting & my lousy composition, not the lens.
    Would a (good) monopod give better results due to its flexibility and mobility you think?

  15. #75
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Maybe but not definitely, my shot 2 would not be possible with either tripod or monopod. Either I hurt the pod knocking into something or someone else when I tilt up the camera. Birds in flight leaves you no chance to react carefully. Handheld is still more intuitive way of shooting.

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by lankyal
    Image 1 is nice and a good capture.

    I took the liberty of sharpening it and hope you don't mind.



    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
    I won't mind if you can teach me how to see your picture. Imageshack refuses to show
    Last edited by Cowseye; 13th April 2011 at 12:23 PM.
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  17. #77
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    Anyway, seriously, is there any advice for spotting birds? I'm a bit disheartened by the several occasions that I can hear the birds near me but I cannot even see them.
    Seem like you had learn to hear them, good. Its not easy to locate birds in the tree or bushes. Sometimes the sound direction you hear may not be what it seems to be. You have to learn to distinguish what bird is calling. (takes years to master and I only able to reconise a few after nearly 4 years). Try your best to pinpoint the direction of call using triangulation method. (hearing from a few spots)

    Why knowing what bird is calling is important is because there will a few things to look out for:

    1. Size of bird
    2. colour of bird
    3. behaviour of the bird
    4. is it rerally a bird calling. (some insects can make similar sounds)

    Once you got the colour and size, its easier to "program" your eyes to look for these because your brain do not nee to go through the process of all the colours and size. Some birds are so well hidden that you need to look out for its next movement.

    A bino will help to search for the birds. Cheap and good one I would recomend is the Nikon Monach 8x42. (about $390)

    Finally I would like to advise new birders or Birders wannabe is this. Although we like to share our knowledge and learn from each other, we would apreciate that when you shoot birds, always put the welfare of the bird 1st. Try not to go too near to the comfort zone of the bird and do not disturb their nest and its surrounding habitat. Our presence will leave a scent for other predators (monkeys, snakes etc) to attack them or their nest. If you happen to see or know any nesting site, please do not post the photos until the chicks had successfully fledged. Thank you.

  18. #78

    Default Re: Birdie shots

    I had been looking through hundreds or even thousands of birdie photos in flickr for yrs. Read up there are ten of thousands different breed in this world. Never think I can finish taking photos for all of them but hope to view them in photos.

    There is a big difference in the way different photographers shoot their birdies. Some photo are very nice with the birdie really stand-out. Only prime lens can do it? Or lots of PP involved? I know skill-set is a must too in birdie.

  19. #79
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    @lanykal: I'll get back to you on the photo, can't see it properly on my itouch

    @DeSwitch: thanks for the in-depth insight. I read a few threads abt photographer "attacking" bird's nest, but I didn't know the impact is more of the scent for the predator. Learnt something new. Is there any write up online that talks abt the behavior of various birds? I will also do a check later. Thanks for sharing so much
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  20. #80
    Member watsup's Avatar
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    Default Re: Birdie shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    #3
    Black capped KF I have yet to shoot this

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