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Thread: OT: Singular for lens is still LENS, not LEN!

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by likefunyouare
    Another common mistake: Marco instead of Macro.
    not forgetting "aperature" ...
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  2. #22

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    I can't help it a my key i poilt o I have to type len in tead of len .
    wow! what happened to your ass? err i meant 'S'

  4. #24

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    hehe, keep reviving this thread

    Still see so many LEN in the threads

  5. #25

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    They may be bad spellers but that doesn't make them bad photographers. Is ClubSNAP a forum offering English tuition?

  6. #26

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    Did anyone mention bad photography? Why so sensitive?

  7. #27

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    ya, the marco is disturbing, been tempted to mention that too.

    Scandisk brand cf card

    camara

    Cannon camera

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaeSiuM
    They may be bad spellers but that doesn't make them bad photographers. Is ClubSNAP a forum offering English tuition?
    so u wun mind if ppl refer to u as "Ceasuim"?

    just curious....

    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  9. #29

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    I can't help but get irritated when people say FLIM!

    It drives me crazy!

    its FILM! FILM!!! FILM!!!!!

    *steps off soapbox*

    *end of rant and goes back to her padded comfortable cell with the nice jacket that ties in the back*

  10. #30
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    OT to your OT:

    Singular for 1Ds is still 1DS, not 1D!

    Plural for 1D is still 1... erm...

    Plural for 1Ds is erm...

    Oh sod it, I'm buying Nikon.

    Replacement for 1D is 1D Mk II

    Replacement for 1Ds is 1Ds Mk II

    Replacement for 10D is 10D Mk...

    Oh nevermind.

    So, when's Canon going to get to the 0.025D Mk XVII?

  11. #31

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    When I was studing in England, I made a big joke out of myself oneday at the departmental store.

    I was approached by the salesgirl if I needed help. I told her my pants were soiled and I needed a pair of new ones immediately. Her face turned red and he immediately bring me to the gents department... where the underwear section is

    Obviously, we ourselves are so hao lian that we believe our English is the best in Asia. Nevertheless, pants means underwear in English, and the proper word to use is TROUSERS!

    ha ha... no wonder her face turned red

    Other common terms:

    A bucket of water instead of a pail of water
    I am ill and not I am sick! If you say 'I am sick' means you're some kind of pervert or mentally unstable kekekek...
    Trucks and not lorry (they don't understand what is lorry)
    Take a shower, rather than bath unless you use a bath tub.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by chisiang
    Nevertheless, pants means underwear in English, and the proper word to use is TROUSERS!
    Actually, I think it's more an American/British thing. If you dig up most dictionaries, a definition of pants will be trousers. In fact I'm not sure if the reverse holds true, that you'll find pants as a definition of underwear. I think it's just another one of those regional variations. For instance, with regards to women's underwear, in Singapore it's panties, in Britain its knickers.

    A bucket of water instead of a pail of water

    Not sure what's wrong with either? But then, I'm Singaporean after all

    I am ill and not I am sick! If you say 'I am sick' means you're some kind of pervert or mentally unstable kekekek...

    Actually, it's perfectly acceptable to be sick, although ill causes less confusion. Many words in the English language mean more than one thing and one meaning doesn't mean that the others become invalid. I agree that for the purposes of clarity, ill makes more sense. Just to further illustrate the point above, over here sick is probably used most often to indicate vomit.

    Trucks and not lorry (they don't understand what is lorry)

    I tend to agree with this, I think I'm the only one here who uses the term lorry. But I've never not been understood, and interestingly, doing a search at dictionary.com indicates that the word lorry is "chiefly British"...

    Take a shower, rather than bath unless you use a bath tub.

    Aye, a shower's a shower, a bath's a bath. The problem comes in using the terms too casually.

    A fridge is a fridge and a freezer's a freezer; a fridge/freezer is exactly that.

    A detached house is one or more storeys; it's just detached from any other house. On the other hand, a bungalow is strictly single storeyed only, although certain types of bungalows will support a semi-second storey in the roof area. A bungalow need not be detached, and a detached house need not be a bungalow.

    The roof area in British terms is a loft, not the attic, although I think you'll be understood either way.

    Like it's lift to you and me and everyone here, but it's an elevator to the Americans.

    And how it's 1st, 2nd etc storeys in America and Singapore, but Ground, 1st, 2nd etc over here.

    And how one side of the world uses storeys, and the other floors... it never ends.

    Most of all of this is really down to regional variations, primarily affected by American and British influences. Like it or not the root of Singapore English is in British vernacular, but the problem is that most of what comes over the box is American. And Singapore, as a result, ends up very confused...

  13. #33
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    Actually British is not just English, there are also Scottish and Welsh who are also British. And American is not just USA citizens, there are also Canadian and Mexican who are also American.

  14. #34

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    chisiang, does your surname happen to be Ang? Coz i know of someone with the same name studying in UK.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Someone
    I can't help but get irritated when people say FLIM!

    It drives me crazy!

    its FILM! FILM!!! FILM!!!!!
    FLIM is when we say film with a French accent.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jed
    Actually, I think it's more an American/British thing. If you dig up most dictionaries, a definition of pants will be trousers. In fact I'm not sure if the reverse holds true, that you'll find pants as a definition of underwear. I think it's just another one of those regional variations. For instance, with regards to women's underwear, in Singapore it's panties, in Britain its knickers.

    A bucket of water instead of a pail of water

    Not sure what's wrong with either? But then, I'm Singaporean after all

    I am ill and not I am sick! If you say 'I am sick' means you're some kind of pervert or mentally unstable kekekek...

    Actually, it's perfectly acceptable to be sick, although ill causes less confusion. Many words in the English language mean more than one thing and one meaning doesn't mean that the others become invalid. I agree that for the purposes of clarity, ill makes more sense. Just to further illustrate the point above, over here sick is probably used most often to indicate vomit.

    Trucks and not lorry (they don't understand what is lorry)

    I tend to agree with this, I think I'm the only one here who uses the term lorry. But I've never not been understood, and interestingly, doing a search at dictionary.com indicates that the word lorry is "chiefly British"...

    Take a shower, rather than bath unless you use a bath tub.

    Aye, a shower's a shower, a bath's a bath. The problem comes in using the terms too casually.

    A fridge is a fridge and a freezer's a freezer; a fridge/freezer is exactly that.

    A detached house is one or more storeys; it's just detached from any other house. On the other hand, a bungalow is strictly single storeyed only, although certain types of bungalows will support a semi-second storey in the roof area. A bungalow need not be detached, and a detached house need not be a bungalow.

    The roof area in British terms is a loft, not the attic, although I think you'll be understood either way.

    Like it's lift to you and me and everyone here, but it's an elevator to the Americans.

    And how it's 1st, 2nd etc storeys in America and Singapore, but Ground, 1st, 2nd etc over here.

    And how one side of the world uses storeys, and the other floors... it never ends.

    Most of all of this is really down to regional variations, primarily affected by American and British influences. Like it or not the root of Singapore English is in British vernacular, but the problem is that most of what comes over the box is American. And Singapore, as a result, ends up very confused...
    Thanks Jed.

    I've never learned more about English than this.

    Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Astin
    Actually British is not just English, there are also Scottish and Welsh who are also British. And American is not just USA citizens, there are also Canadian and Mexican who are also American.
    Err, I never said it was! But try telling Canadians and Mexicans that they are American, I think you won't live very long. You're confusing the nationality with the continents for the American thing. For the British thing, I think I'm fully away of that on a day to day basis!

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sion
    Thanks Jed.

    I've never learned more about English than this.

    Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.
    Eh, your thanks too profuse liao. Do I detect a hint of sarcasm?

  19. #39
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    some definition of the word Len

  20. #40
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    Finally! I can't remember how many times I have cringed on words such as Lense, Len, Aperature and Shuttle Speed (which shuttle? MIR? Apollo 13?)



    Jed, there is no plural for 1D or 1Ds. You got to say "That rich chap has got 2 Canon 1Ds Bodies".

    Regards
    CK

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