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Thread: Travel photography

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by photonoob
    hihi i'm a noob in photography and currently owns a nikon D70 with a 18-70mm lens. As i will be planning on a trip to new zealand this coming Sep/Oct, i need infos on the various aspect with regards to photography. As i understand, temperature will be around 10 - 18 degrees, will it affect my lens and battery ? What other kinds of filter i'll need ? circular polarizing , ND filters ? and also , will i need a remote in order to shoot some waterfall shot? ( to get the slow and flowy effect ) . By saving the photos in a small size format (which will give me 1K exposure) , will it affect a R8 size print ? Expert advise needed urgently pls ........
    Hi I believe this is your first time carrying a digital camera overseas? One big advise is to bring many spare batteries, a charger. Due to the low temperature, your battery will dry up faster. so try not to used too much of the LCD viewer.

    If you have a portable storage, bring along, if not bring lots of spare CF cards.

    (this is optional) -> get a hand warmer and wrap the spare battery with it to prevent the batteries from losing energy.

    for filters, it was already mentioned by other CS'ers.

    It will be very tempting to shoot many shot along the way cos the scenery are fantastic and becos you are using digicam. Think before you shoot. capture some scenery that you can't find in postcard.

    Shoot in the highest resolution as possible.

    Also, it is easy to shoot 1000 photos in digital, but not easy to post process them (you will cry).

    If you get 100 good shots out of 1000 shots, something is wrong.

    Tripod are useful. bring along.

    Lastly, your equipment are not cheap. get an insurance coverage for them. also not to forget to get yourself one too
    Last edited by jimtong; 18th August 2004 at 12:24 AM.

  2. #22

    Default Take many many photographs

    Hi,
    Just to share my experiences with you. New Zealand is a VERY BEAUTIFUL country. Its because of my trip to New Zealand that got me interested in photography. Had a wonderful time there as we hired a personel tour guide whose forte was photography tour.The best part was we gave him out own itineray of the places we wanted to go and he brought us there. we stayed the entire two weeks in the South Island and my only regret was not to have learned how to take good photos before my trip. Anyways, bring whatever equipment that you think you might need to capture that 'magic' photo cos you are going to regret not having the proper equipment at that special moment in time. Believe me, lugging around an extra weight is worth it! .

    SHall provide you the website of the tour guide that we hired. Though it may not look like its a professional website, he definitley gave us a professional first class service all the way Just my five cents worth


    http://www.offbeattours.co.nz

  3. #23
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    Tripods need not be heavy. I usually bring along a sub 1.2kg non CF tripod (Slik Sprint Pro GM) for use with my 300D overseas. Just need to change the ballhead to something better and you're set. It's not the most stable of set-up but adequate.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbma
    Totally disagree with you. New Zealand has one of the best landscape sceneries around this part of the world. It is postcard standard. Do take plenty of landscape. It's worth it. Bring a light tripod if you can. Most of the time you will be shooting wide.
    I hope you do not mind me saying this. I think you misunderstand me. NZ is arguably one of the best places for landscape photograph. No doubt about it! I am myself planning a photo trip to NZ.

    What I am saying is that, in a regular tour, at the time you arrived in these places, you are unlikely to be in the most favorable of time for landscape photography. I am sure you are aware that photographs taken during the late morning and afternoon are very flat. I had said that if you are part of a regular tour, whatever landscape pictures you take are not going to be taken at the best light! It does not mean that you can't take them, but they will not be "great". You can still take them as memories (I was there shots). But IF your travel objective is photography, by all means! Take all the equipment you need. Make no sense to take unsuitable equipments. You will find the sacrifice worth it! But ask yourself. What is the main purpose of the travel? "Regular" tour with family? Or a "dedicated" photo tour. The concession I may have (and here I am not sure how NZ tours work) is that if your hotels/camp sites are exactly where the landscapes are, you may still be able to climb out of bed when everybody is sleeping, take your photographs, and then return to join them for breakfast. I did this when I was in Bali.

    The excellent "postcard standard" photographs are not taken during noon time. Of course I have seen "post card standard" landscape photos with "standards" that are.................well.

    Recently I joined a tour with Chan Bros to Yunnan. I lugged 20 kg backpack of camera equipment excluding my Gitzo 1228 and a Arca Swiss B1. I was struck by the awesome landscape in Shangrila. But the lights were very flat. The best light was during breakfast and dinners. You can't expect others to alter their schedule to allow you to photograph. I did take some pictures, and because I was shooting black & white, I was able to make some surrealistic effects (almost Dali like abstract) of landscape using lithographic darkroom printing methods. HOWEVER, if I want to go back again, and I will, I will travel alone (NO FAMILY or COMPANION), and employ a personal guide. I will be there at 5.00 am (meaning waking up at 4.00 am to drive to the locations) waiting for the light to emerge and engulf the land, and 7.00 pm to catch the evening glow. In between, I will put away my 4x5 camera, and use my small leica, taking pictures of Tibetan people and life.

    I will leaving next week to Colorado to photograph the great monuments and sandunes of San Luis valley. I will be carrying in my back pack a 4x5 camera, with three lenses. Films. Meter. Etc etc. This does not include my Contax 645 with two lenses to take really fast changing light etc. I will take all these because my PURPOSE of this trip is ONLY ONE. ie PHOTOGRAPHY. And I am not bringing my family. I cannot expect my family to go through what I have to do to make my photographs.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimtong

    If you get 100 good shots out of 1000 shots, something is wrong.
    Actually it is a matter of perception. Ansel Adams photographed landscape for more than 40 years. He was a professional, and damn good!

    It ahs been estimated that in his ENTIRE life time, he probablly made no more than 200 "good" shots!

    It is a question of what is acceptable. When I first started, I kept 30% of my shots (or 300 out of 1000). Now I keep 5 % !(50 out of 1000) becasue what was "good" in the past is no longer good now.

    I understand the point you are trying to say. Do not just click. Take time and look and compose carefully before you press the shutter. You have a better chance of making some good shots than indiscriminate clicking - something the digital shooter are tempted, and often, do.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightstar
    Totally agree with jbma...my fren went with his wife to NZ for honeymoon and he brought a travel tripod. Took wonderful pictures...NZ is fodder for landscape post card pictures!!

    btw, if your wife/gf really loves you, she will bear with your setting up of tripod m sure she is used to it...my fren's wife (my buddy) did so though not without some grumbling but her pride and love in her hubby's work sustained her
    I am sure your fren took wonderful photos! see my earlier post in reply to jbma. It is a matter of what satisfy you. When I say "great", I mean "great", and even beyond "postcard" standard, which to me, is rather mundane.

    I am a very lucky man! My wife not only not complained, she is also my tripod carrier! And when I wait for the right light, the leaves to stop rustling, and the clouds to be in the right position, she would be happily practicing her dancing, reading, or just plain enjoying the outdoors!

    One can often make do with a travel tripod. I have a small but very sturdy leica tripod that can even take a Canon 1V with a standard lens. I carry this when I am not in "total photography mode". But in "serious photography mode", nothing less than a carbon fibre 1228 with my Arca Swiss ballhead. No sense taking anything less! My old bones can still carry those weights,even walking up gentle inclinations. But if I have to climb a lot, I will take the lightest tripod and use various tricks to make it more stable.

  7. #27
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    Photographers are photographers - potential shot missed is very very sayang - every view seen is framed mentally with a camera viewfinder. I think all points aired here are valid - except that our weightage of what is joy and fun is different between serious amateur, casual and the enthusatic amateur. If one is on the first overseas trip and with a good camera, maybe wise to listen to old birds and go thru it once and decide for yourself later what consititute better overall joy/fun.

    I am a very frequent traveller, business cum others (of course). Yes, I missed out the beautiful night scene of Shanghai, grand view from Great wall, etc, awe of the Cave of the Wind in Colorado, thin air view of the Rockies, the colorful Disneyland parade, the romantic Switzerland river taxi rideand so on. But I do have enough good records of the memories. If I can reverse time, will I then fully equipped myself photographically? - most probably no - unless there is one free volunteer to carry the stuff for me. Will I do in future - I think I will give a try to see, for myself, whether the joy of a few beautiful shots can compensate the light freedom that I am accustomed to. Maybe I am older that most of the energertic younger members here - in my NS days, what is SBO and rifle as long as there is no backpack!

    Wait a minute -backpack?!!!

  8. #28

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    OT... ideally, how many days are require for free & easy NZ North and South Island?

  9. #29
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    do remember to enjoy yourself. i think phtoography will be more fun if u enjoyed yourself and your frenz with you. treasure the moments u have overseas.

    this one is me with my gf using a p&s 2MP camera. can tell that i anyhow shoot one....just for memory and fun.

    that time didn't bring dslr.

    http://www.pbase.com/cindyzz/new_zealand

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by novaD70
    Photographers are photographers - potential shot missed is very very sayang - every view seen is framed mentally with a camera viewfinder. I think all points aired here are valid - except that our weightage of what is joy and fun is different between serious amateur, casual and the enthusatic amateur. If one is on the first overseas trip and with a good camera, maybe wise to listen to old birds and go thru it once and decide for yourself later what consititute better overall joy/fun.

    I am a very frequent traveller, business cum others (of course). Yes, I missed out the beautiful night scene of Shanghai, grand view from Great wall, etc, awe of the Cave of the Wind in Colorado, thin air view of the Rockies, the colorful Disneyland parade, the romantic Switzerland river taxi rideand so on. But I do have enough good records of the memories. If I can reverse time, will I then fully equipped myself photographically? - most probably no - unless there is one free volunteer to carry the stuff for me. Will I do in future - I think I will give a try to see, for myself, whether the joy of a few beautiful shots can compensate the light freedom that I am accustomed to. Maybe I am older that most of the energertic younger members here - in my NS days, what is SBO and rifle as long as there is no backpack!

    Wait a minute -backpack?!!!
    Hey! How old are you? I am 52!

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Actually it is a matter of perception. Ansel Adams photographed landscape for more than 40 years. He was a professional, and damn good!

    It ahs been estimated that in his ENTIRE life time, he probablly made no more than 200 "good" shots!

    It is a question of what is acceptable. When I first started, I kept 30% of my shots (or 300 out of 1000). Now I keep 5 % !(50 out of 1000) becasue what was "good" in the past is no longer good now.

    I understand the point you are trying to say. Do not just click. Take time and look and compose carefully before you press the shutter. You have a better chance of making some good shots than indiscriminate clicking - something the digital shooter are tempted, and often, do.
    yah sometime with digital, we tends to "abuse" it hopping to get lucky...

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlvicTay
    OT... ideally, how many days are require for free & easy NZ North and South Island?
    In my opinion, 2 months to have a good look at the place.
    Of course, YMMV.

    BTW, after all this debate of tripod or not, the original person still haven't
    talk about what type of trip he is in for.

    My 2 cents of worth : If you are shooting landscape in many situation you could shoot without the tripod. If you are shooting the sea mammals it would be rather difficult to use tripod. If you intend to do long walks without logistic support, you'll want to loose that tripod. If you are going for a slow moving trip with close vehicle support, then of course bring it on.

    So unless you are planning a photo trip with the require logistic support, just forget about it.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by frisky
    In my opinion, 2 months to have a good look at the place.
    Of course, YMMV.

    BTW, after all this debate of tripod or not, the original person still haven't
    talk about what type of trip he is in for.

    My 2 cents of worth : If you are shooting landscape in many situation you could shoot without the tripod. If you are shooting the sea mammals it would be rather difficult to use tripod. If you intend to do long walks without logistic support, you'll want to loose that tripod. If you are going for a slow moving trip with close vehicle support, then of course bring it on.

    So unless you are planning a photo trip with the require logistic support, just forget about it.
    You are quite right that originator of this thread still have not indicated he type of trip he will be taking!

    So we are discussing "in theory" from experiences.

    But I am not sure whether I can agree in total to your suggestion that in the "absence" of required logistic support, just forget it! I suppose the issue hinges on how much the equipment you carry and your tolerance for "self torture". I found that for myself, a 52 year old bloke, carrying a backpack of some 20 kg excluding tripod and tripod head, is actually quite doable. I tested this at an altitude of about 8000 feet, and I am partially anemic (inherited! Walking some 5-6 km was actually quite pleasant. But as I mentioned earlier, if I have to climb, then I will shed as much as possible. Climbing is quite different from walking!

    About handholding for landscape. If the light is sufficient,such as noon time (unfortunately the light while strong enough to allow handholding, is not the best for phototaking!) and the shutter speed is appropriate, yes, a reasonably sharp picture can be taken. But if one is a stickler for ultimate sharpness, then nothing beats tripod. A lot depends on your personal requirements and "standards"

  14. #34
    Senior Member poohbear's Avatar
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    hey man will be having almost same itinerary as u leh ..... u self drive ? expenses high or not .. read through some guide books and found out their meals would've kill me .. imagine breakfast at NZ$10 .... wish for a S$3 chicken rice instead ...anyway estimated the 2 weeks trip will set me back by 6k .......

  15. #35
    Senior Member poohbear's Avatar
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    sorry lah ... nowdays too busy planning for my wedding and the forecoming honeymoon.... will be self drive trip for 2 wks in Sep/Oct.. winter to spring time .. itinerary as follows ... chirstchurch ---> dunedin ----> Te Anau ----> Milford Sound ---> Queenstown ------> Twizel ----> Mt Cook ----> Christchurch ..

    Will include activities such as - Milford Criuse, Hot Air Balloning in Christchurch. Trekking in Mt Cook and Lake Tekapo . maybe bugee jump in queenstown ... not quite ready yet .. mentally hahah ... that's abt all .. As for equipment , i think i will bring my D70 w/ 28-70mm lens plus one lightweight 'cheapo' tripod plus xtra batt and 2 x 512MB CF one UV and CP-L filter... still considering whether to bring my 70-200 lens along .....quite bulky leh ...

  16. #36
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    ops btw ..... photonoob = poohbear now ...

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Hey! How old are you? I am 52!
    Hi Senior, you beat me to the half century mark. Maybe I should change my login name to Pupil.

    You are a fit old fellow. Most of the time, my luggage to overseas is less than 20kg total, just equal to yr camera stuff only! I'm ashame.

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by novaD70
    Hi Senior, you beat me to the half century mark. Maybe I should change my login name to Pupil.

    You are a fit old fellow. Most of the time, my luggage to overseas is less than 20kg total, just equal to yr camera stuff only! I'm ashame.
    Ha Ha!

    Actually I am not very fit. Yes, I walk up to my office 16 floors every day. But I am not very fit! In fact in addition to my inborn anemia, I have other physical disabilities.

    What is have is called "foolhardiness"/"bo-khia-si"!

    I think it is the mind-set, and what matters to you.

    If a holiday, then enjoy it with your family etc, and take whatever photo opportunities that come along. The photo is secondary. Pare down equipments to the minimun. But I still think bring a small but sturdy tripod. I love my small leica tripod. Tough and up to many jobs.

    But like my trip next week, the main objective is photography. #1 to photograph my friend, a well known photographer whose works are recently collected by Museum of Modern Art in San Diego. I will also take the opportunity to photograph alongside him.
    #2 To photograph the great sandunes of the Colorado deserts.

    So I make sure I have the right equipment for the job! Whatever it takes!

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Ha Ha!

    Actually I am not very fit. Yes, I walk up to my office 16 floors every day. But I am not very fit! In fact in addition to my inborn anemia, I have other physical disabilities.

    What is have is called "foolhardiness"/"bo-khia-si"!

    I think it is the mind-set, and what matters to you.

    If a holiday, then enjoy it with your family etc, and take whatever photo opportunities that come along. The photo is secondary. Pare down equipments to the minimun. But I still think bring a small but sturdy tripod. I love my small leica tripod. Tough and up to many jobs.

    But like my trip next week, the main objective is photography. #1 to photograph my friend, a well known photographer whose works are recently collected by Museum of Modern Art in San Diego. I will also take the opportunity to photograph alongside him.
    #2 To photograph the great sandunes of the Colorado deserts.

    So I make sure I have the right equipment for the job! Whatever it takes!
    wow looking forwawrd for your photo njoy man!!!

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