Page 31 of 36 FirstFirst ... 621262930313233 ... LastLast
Results 601 to 620 of 704

Thread: Bon Appétit

  1. #601
    Member ntheni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,907

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by asthio88
    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - RAOHE



    Grilled chicken with Spring onions (蔥腿板燒)

    蔥腿板燒 is one of the highly recommended must-eat food, itss so popular in Taiwan it has made headlines and appeared in almost all the top TV variety shows. Similar to teppanyaki, it uses iron griddle to grill the food. The marinated chicken is grilled and then mixed with spring onions and sauce and served with pepper and sesame seeds.

    This stall, 霸王別雞 (very nice name) in Raohe may not be as popular as &雞匠 of Fu Jen Night Market but this delicacy seemed too good to miss. We ordered the original taste with wasabi and were served a box of burning hot, fragrant chicken. The marinated drumstick meat was very flavorful, juicy and tender and complemented perfectly with the spring onions; the wasabi was just nice, not too overpowering but the (teriyaki?) sauce however, was a tad too salty.

    Thanks for viewing....

    I shall out this into my "Must Try List" on my next TW trip!!!

  2. #602

    Default Re: Bon Appétit

    Had this in BKK....yummy.."P

    Removed.
    Last edited by bluecomfort; 24th July 2012 at 06:42 PM. Reason: Removal

  3. #603

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - RAOHE




    Cart Wheel Cake/Che Lun Bing (車輪餅)


    Che lun bing (車輪餅) or Cart Wheel Cake is a Chinese snack with long history and its origin could be traced back to some 250 years ago. When Emperor Qian Long of Qing Dynasty (1711-1799) chanced upon a small eatery with a couplet of ‘善做淮北面点 , 巧作江南佳肴’ (basically means capable in Huaibei snacks, skillful in Jiangnan cuisines) on the front door, he challenged the owner whom he thought boastful to make a snack that not only tastes good, sounds good but has to look like the wheel on his cart. The eatery owner, Zhang Shanqiao, his wife and his daughter succeeded in making a snack which satisfied and silenced the Emperor.

    It was originally a deep-fried snack but Che Lun Bing today is mostly baked, pretty similar to the Japanese Azuki pancakes. A batter (of flour, butter and eggs) is poured into molds and filled with red bean, radish, coconut and many other ingredients.

    This stall in Raohe offers 4 flavors: red bean, radish, peanut and cream. We ordered radish and cream flavor at TWD25 for 3 cakes but after knowing where we are from, the shy and friendly lady boss insisted of giving us a treat and refused to accept our payment. It might not be a big sum but it really made our day. The cake was delicious, crunchy on the edges and soft on every other part. The radish flavor was the best - the sweet cake combined with the salty radish fillings was simply yummilicious. The cream flavor was very ‘cheesy’ and so full of it and when bitten, it practically gushed out! Definitely something one should try.












    Thanks for viewing....




    Last edited by asthio88; 23rd July 2012 at 11:46 PM.

  4. #604

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - RAOHE




    Ice-cream Roll with Peanut Brittle Shavings (生化糖冰淇淋)


    There are many unique and ‘weird’ delicacies in Taiwan and I have always wondered what would it taste like mixing ice-cream with peanut brittle and coriander leaves. Seriously, coriander! I have come across stalls selling this intriguing dessert all over Taiwan but have never actually tried.

    This dessert originated from Yilan, looks similar to burrito or our popiah/薄饼 (spring-roll). A huge block of peanut brittle is shaved with an old-school wooden tool used by carpenters and then put the shavings on top of a thin crepe-like wrap (similar to popiah skin), add ice-cream (the most common being taro, pineapple and peanut) and then sprinkling it with coriander leaves. Finally get it all wrapped up ala spring roll and it’s done.

    It’s weird and seemed like a strange pairing but surprisingly, the coriander complemented the ice-cream incredibly well and combined with the sweetness and flakiness of the carmelized peanuts, it was indeed refreshing. Perhaps it explained why this simple dessert is so immensely popular.













    Thanks for viewing....







  5. #605

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - RAOHE


    If you only have time for one night market in Taipei, which one will you go to? I believe the choice is obvious for many and that is non other than Shilin Night Market (士林夜市). For me, it will be a tough call as I believe Raohe is as good as Shilin and no way pale in comparison. During our 7 days in Taipei, we visited Raohe twice but only once to Shilin. This place is super packed no doubt but still better compares to Shilin. And it is located within one long street, all the stalls are kinda consolidated in one place. I have no clue how many food stalls/eateries were there and despite the 2 visits, we certainly missed many great food; salted chicken, oyster cake, pepper meat bun, tian bu la, sausage, roasted corn.....there was simply no room left in our tummy. I highly recommend this night market to anyone visiting Taipei.

    oyster cake


    salted chicken


    sausages


    tian bu la





    Thanks for viewing....







    Last edited by asthio88; 26th July 2012 at 11:02 AM.

  6. #606
    Member Janetleeyj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Singapore, Indonesia
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Wahhahh got it for free ah? I rlly miss out so many goodie so easy plan other trip lyke you meh I got try the BBQ corn but not vry nice, don't know how to describe, still prefer rebus one.



    Quote Originally Posted by asthio88 View Post
    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - RAOHE




    Cart Wheel Cake/Che Lun Bing (車輪餅)



    This stall in Raohe offers 4 flavors: red bean, radish, peanut and cream. We ordered radish and cream flavor at TWD25 for 3 cakes but after knowing where we are from, the shy and friendly lady boss insisted of giving us a treat and refused to accept our payment. It might not be a big sum but it really made our day. The cake was delicious, crunchy on the edges and soft on every other part. The radish flavor was the best - the sweet cake combined with the salty radish fillings was simply yummilicious. The cream flavor was very ‘cheesy’ and so full of it and when bitten, it practically gushed out! Definitely something one should try.







    Thanks for viewing....





  7. #607

    Default Taiwanese Food

    Ding Tai Fung


    I was once told many years ago; “You haven't been to Taipei if you haven't dined at Ding Tai Fung!”

    Seriously? Perhaps not but many thought so. The pioneer in the superb and amazingly delectable xiao long bao (literally means small steaming basket bun) has gained recognition world-wide as the best in the trade, ranked one of the world's top 10 restaurants by The New York Times in 1993 and its outlets in Hong Kong were awarded one Michelin star by Michelin Guide in 2010. Was it really that good? Well I tried and have been patronizing DTF whenever I am in Taipei ever since.

    So what’s the difference between DTF in Taipei and Singapore, or Hong Kong? I guess the mentality of nothing beats the original but that’s not all - food aside, the service from the ever-smiling, super friendly waitresses makes every visit so enjoyable. It’s no wonder why almost all DTF branches/outlets made it to the list of the best restaurants in Taipei (by travel websites) and its main outlet always tops the ranking.




    Don’t be fooled by the inconspicuous, small shop front - this 4-storey shophouse along Xinyi Road, at the top of Yongkang Street is where DTF started.




    The front of the shop is often packed with queuing customers and curious onlookers and sometimes one would need to wait for at least an hour just to get in so plan your time, I usually go in the early morning to beat the lunch crowd which could start forming as early as 10.30am. I have tried DTF in Taipei 101 and Zhongxiao East but this original outlet is still my favorite despite having to climb all the way up through the narrow stairs.




    The appertizers, worthy to be in the main menu. This stewed beancurd which is braised in honey and fragrant sauce and mixed with edamame beans, bamboo shot, mushroom and black fungus, was really delicious.









    Thanks for viewing....


  8. #608
    Member ntheni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,907

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Quote Originally Posted by asthio88 View Post
    Ding Tai Fung


    I was once told many years ago; “You haven't been to Taipei if you haven't dined at Ding Tai Fung!”

    Seriously? Perhaps not but many thought so. The pioneer in the superb and amazingly delectable xiao long bao (literally means small steaming basket bun) has gained recognition world-wide as the best in the trade, ranked one of the world's top 10 restaurants by The New York Times in 1993 and its outlets in Hong Kong were awarded one Michelin star by Michelin Guide in 2010. Was it really that good? Well I tried and have been patronizing DTF whenever I am in Taipei ever since.

    So what’s the difference between DTF in Taipei and Singapore, or Hong Kong? I guess the mentality of nothing beats the original but that’s not all - food aside, the service from the ever-smiling, super friendly waitresses makes every visit so enjoyable. It’s no wonder why almost all DTF branches/outlets made it to the list of the best restaurants in Taipei (by travel websites) and its main outlet always tops the ranking.




    Don’t be fooled by the inconspicuous, small shop front - this 4-storey shophouse along Xinyi Road, at the top of Yongkang Street is where DTF started.




    The front of the shop is often packed with queuing customers and curious onlookers and sometimes one would need to wait for at least an hour just to get in so plan your time, I usually go in the early morning to beat the lunch crowd which could start forming as early as 10.30am. I have tried DTF in Taipei 101 and Zhongxiao East but this original outlet is still my favorite despite having to climb all the way up through the narrow stairs.




    The appertizers, worthy to be in the main menu. This stewed beancurd which is braised in honey and fragrant sauce and mixed with edamame beans, bamboo shot, mushroom and black fungus, was really delicious.









    Thanks for viewing....

    Singapore DTF cannot make it already.... Still TW better haha

  9. #609

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Quote Originally Posted by Janetleeyj View Post
    Wahhahh got it for free ah? I rlly miss out so many goodie so easy plan other trip lyke you meh I got try the BBQ corn but not vry nice, don't know how to describe, still prefer rebus one.
    Yup, the lady boss insisted of giving us a treat, really nice of her What's so difficult 'planning'?
    Not sure on the roasted corn, we didn't try but they sure looked delicious.



    Quote Originally Posted by ntheni View Post
    Singapore DTF cannot make it already.... Still TW better haha
    Was very excited when they started out in Singapore but after trying, it just didn't feel the same. Not just the food (which was a far cry) but the service too. The last time I had DTF locally was some 2.5 years ago. I have tried their setups in HK too but I still prefer the original

  10. #610

    Default Taiwanese Food

    Ding Tai Fung



    Glass Noodle Soup with Tofu and Meat Roll (油豆腐細粉)

    Though I love DTF’s xiao long bao but this simple, unassuming dish is my favorite. Fried tofu along with meat rolls (lightly fried beancurd skins filled with lean meat) were added to the soup and garnished with chopped spring onions. They went really well with the silky-smooth melt-in-the-mouth glass noodles; the light broth was very pleasing and comforting, though a lil bland in taste but it was a good starter for the day.











    Thanks for viewing....



    Last edited by asthio88; 1st August 2012 at 12:42 PM.

  11. #611

    Default Taiwanese Food

    Ding Tai Fung



    Fried Sauce Noodles / Zha Jiang Mian (炸酱面)

    Another of our regular, must-order dish. The twirled noodles were topped with ‘fried sauce’ of juicy minced pork, mushrooms, bean curds, edamame beans and thick, fragrant gravy. Nicely presented, it didn’t only look good but tasted heavenly too. When we commented that the portion of the mixed sauce was not as generous as it used to be, the waitress and the captain apologized and we were quickly served an extra bowl of sauce. This is the kind of customer service that makes the difference and why customers keep going back to them.











    Thanks for viewing....






  12. #612

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Hi Bon Apetit,

    Indeed a foodie. I see your passion oozing out from your photos.
    I have not followed the whole thread, but just want to ask if you would try with flash? e.g. backlighting etc?

    Heavensent

  13. #613
    Member Janetleeyj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Singapore, Indonesia
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    We got try the 101 Taipei branch, still crowded even afternoon 3+. food vry nice, i think got many dish here dont have. How come you didnt eat the xiaolungbau? Cc love the crab meat one. Service rlly rlly good wor



    Quote Originally Posted by asthio88 View Post
    Ding Tai Fung


    I was once told many years ago; “You haven't been to Taipei if you haven't dined at Ding Tai Fung!”

    Seriously? Perhaps not but many thought so. The pioneer in the superb and amazingly delectable xiao long bao (literally means small steaming basket bun) has gained recognition world-wide as the best in the trade, ranked one of the world's top 10 restaurants by The New York Times in 1993 and its outlets in Hong Kong were awarded one Michelin star by Michelin Guide in 2010. Was it really that good? Well I tried and have been patronizing DTF whenever I am in Taipei ever since.

    So what’s the difference between DTF in Taipei and Singapore, or Hong Kong? I guess the mentality of nothing beats the original but that’s not all - food aside, the service from the ever-smiling, super friendly waitresses makes every visit so enjoyable. It’s no wonder why almost all DTF branches/outlets made it to the list of the best restaurants in Taipei (by travel websites) and its main outlet always tops the ranking.




    The appertizers, worthy to be in the main menu. This stewed beancurd which is braised in honey and fragrant sauce and mixed with edamame beans, bamboo shot, mushroom and black fungus, was really delicious.









    Thanks for viewing....


  14. #614

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Quote Originally Posted by Janetleeyj View Post
    We got try the 101 Taipei branch, still crowded even afternoon 3+. food vry nice, i think got many dish here dont have. How come you didnt eat the xiaolungbau? Cc love the crab meat one. Service rlly rlly good wor
    Yup, the food was good through out DTF outlets that I have tried, so was the service. Of course I did, xlb is a must have dish



    Quote Originally Posted by Heavensent View Post
    Hi Bon Apetit,

    Indeed a foodie. I see your passion oozing out from your photos.
    I have not followed the whole thread, but just want to ask if you would try with flash? e.g. backlighting etc?

    Heavensent
    Hi Heavensent, thanks for dropping by and your kind words.
    I don't use flash unless if it's absolutely necessary, usually bounced and diffused.

  15. #615

    Default Taiwanese Food

    Ding Tai Fung



    Xiao Long Bao (小籠包)

    Xiaolongbao (literally small steaming basket bun) is one the many type of Chinese baozi (buns) and originated from Shanghai. It is traditionally steamed in small bamboo baskets, hence the name xiaolong (small steaming basket). Xiaolongbao are often referred to as soup dumplings or simply dumplings in English, but are not regarded as one in China; dumplings refer to jiaozi, similar to this and this.

    I guess DTF xiaolongbao needs no further introduction; the thin 18-folds skin, the juicy pork and the bursting hot fragrant broth are always a pleasure to have. Though dipping them in black vinegar/soy sauce with shredded ginger will further enhanced the flavor but I prefer having them ‘raw’. Their red-bean-paste xlb is my absolute favorite – who could resist this creamy, smooth and delightful indulgence?


    Pork Xialongbao







    Red Bean Paste Xiaolongbao







    Thanks for viewing....

  16. #616

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - SHILIN


    士林夜市 or Shilin Night Market is probably one of the most famous and popular night market in Taiwan. It is very well-organized and is separated into two major sections. One sector covers the streets surrounding the traditional Yangming Theatre and stretching to the Chicheng Temple on Danan Rd. The other sector (of the old Shilin Market building) is a centralized food court serving a wide variety of local snacks. Personally, I find the basement of the new food court ‘inaccessible’ due to poor ventilation. The stench and the smoke gushing up the escalator was enough to turn us back. A real pity I guess, we didn’t know what we might have missed.

    In addition to the food court, side streets and alleys are lined with storefronts and roadside stalls selling local flavors, many are unique and only available here – stir-fried squids, super size chicken cutlet, pig blood cake, roasted duck wrap, pepper cake, tian bu la, small sausage in large sausage and coffin-shaped bread (which we missed out) are the more popular few.

    Apart from food, Shilin is also a popular hunting ground for good bargain clothes, shoes and accessories. Shilin night market is definitely worth visiting. It is conveniently located, the closest metro station is Jiantan on the Tamsui Line (Red Line) and the enclosed food court could be seen from the station's platform. This night market is always packed with visitors; crowds start forming from as early as 5pm and reach their peak between 7 - 11pm, so plan your time.









    Pig's Blood Cake (豬血糕)


    Unlike the Hongkong version where the dish is made purely with pig’s blood (known as 豬紅 or Pig’s Red), the Taiwan version is made by with pig’s blood and glutinous rice, coated in crushed peanut and is served ala popsicle with coriander leaves. Definitely not my cup of tea, my wife thought it was not bad but could be better with more blood (yikes!).













    Thanks for viewing....


  17. #617

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - SHILIN




    Pepper Bun (胡椒餅)


    Hu Jiao Bing (胡椒餅) literally means ‘pepper biscuit’ is one of the most popular snacks in the night markets, especially so in Raohe. Right at the entrance of its Eastern Gate, you can see long line of people queuing for a piece of this snack in front of this famous stall at any time of the day. With that kind of crowd, it ought to be good. Despite my two visits to Raohe, I didn’t get to try because of the super long queue and was pleasantly surprised to chance upon the same stall in Shilin.

    Hu Jiao Bing is a kind of (crispy) peppered bun with meat filling and lots of spring onions. It is cooked in a tandoor oven (pretty similar to the making of Indian naans); the buns are slapped onto the side of the oven and scrapped off once done baking. While queuing, the whole making process was pretty enjoyable to watch. So how good was it?

    Well, we love it - the bun was crispy and flaky on the outside but soft within and filled with juicy meat with piping hot sauce oozing out, very fragrant and flavorful. Despite its name, it wasn’t as peppery as we thought it would be and definitely something worth trying.
















    Thanks for viewing....




  18. #618
    Member ntheni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,907

    Default Re: Taiwanese Food

    Quote Originally Posted by asthio88 View Post
    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - SHILIN




    Pepper Bun (胡椒餅)


    Hu Jiao Bing (胡椒餅) literally means ‘pepper biscuit’ is one of the most popular snacks in the night markets, especially so in Raohe. Right at the entrance of its Eastern Gate, you can see long line of people queuing for a piece of this snack in front of this famous stall at any time of the day. With that kind of crowd, it ought to be good. Despite my two visits to Raohe, I didn’t get to try because of the super long queue and was pleasantly surprised to chance upon the same stall in Shilin.

    Hu Jiao Bing is a kind of (crispy) peppered bun with meat filling and lots of spring onions. It is cooked in a tandoor oven (pretty similar to the making of Indian naans); the buns are slapped onto the side of the oven and scrapped off once done baking. While queuing, the whole making process was pretty enjoyable to watch. So how good was it?

    Well, we love it - the bun was crispy and flaky on the outside but soft within and filled with juicy meat with piping hot sauce oozing out, very fragrant and flavorful. Despite its name, it wasn’t as peppery as we thought it would be and definitely something worth trying.














    Thanks for viewing....



    oh~~ I miss this hahaha well taken bro

  19. #619

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - SHILIN




    Roasted Duck Roll (烤鸭夹饼)


    Pretty similar to the Beijing roasted duck roll except this one was huge. The sliced duck along with lots of pickles, cucumber, spring onion, chives and bean sprout were wrapped in a large spring roll skin. Plum sauce, sweet and chili sauce were added giving it an extra oomph. It was pretty good - the condiments complemented well with the tender duck meat and the skin which remained crispy, but I found it a little too sourish perhaps due to the (over) generous serving of the pickles.














    Thanks for viewing....




  20. #620

    Default Taiwanese Food

    TAIPEI NIGHT MARKET - SHILIN




    Zhuang Yuan Gao (状元糕)


    This is one of the relatively rare and unknown Taiwanese snacks. Zhuang Yuan (状元) literally means Champion or Top Scholar (highest rank of the Imperial examination system) and the name is derived because of its’ scholar's cap-like shape. It is considered an auspicious food for many locals and is usually consumed by exam candidates hoping to be blessed with good results.

    The flour (mixture) is placed in a special wooden mold on a steamer, filled with peanut or sesame paste and then covered with another layer of flour and that’s it. Pretty similar to Singapore kueh tutu (嘟嘟糕) but it is made with glutinous rice flour instead of rice flour. Very rich in texture but I think our kueh tutu fares better.










    Thanks for viewing & have a nice weekend....





Page 31 of 36 FirstFirst ... 621262930313233 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •