Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

  1. #1

    Default Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    I hope I'm posting in the right forum ><

    I'm new to film/photography, and recently bought a roll of Fujifilm Superia 400 to try out on the Canon EOS 300 my aunt passed down to me. While researching on the net I came across this function called manual ISO override. What would be the effects of, say, using ISO 100 or ISO 800 on this film?

  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,901

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by metzalx View Post
    I hope I'm posting in the right forum ><

    I'm new to film/photography, and recently bought a roll of Fujifilm Superia 400 to try out on the Canon EOS 300 my aunt passed down to me. While researching on the net I came across this function called manual ISO override. What would be the effects of, say, using ISO 100 or ISO 800 on this film?
    you can do so by setting the ISO manual, not setting on DX code on the film speed, and you need to accomplish this by alternating film processing timing, a simply explanation is you rate Fujifilm Superia 400 at ISO 800, you underexposed the film by one stop, so you length the film develop timing, it is call push processing, and if you rate the film at ISO 200, you will cut short the film develop timing and it is call pull processing.

    however, you need take note that once you change your ISO, it has to apply same ISO setting to the entire roll, as the whole roll of film will receive the same developing timing. and it also have some trade off of the quality.

    Btw, not all labs offer such service and the developing charge is higher than processing it normally, so buying the film with the right speed is more economy.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  3. #3

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by metzalx View Post
    I hope I'm posting in the right forum ><

    I'm new to film/photography, and recently bought a roll of Fujifilm Superia 400 to try out on the Canon EOS 300 my aunt passed down to me. While researching on the net I came across this function called manual ISO override. What would be the effects of, say, using ISO 100 or ISO 800 on this film?
    In general, when you push process, you lost quality, but different film has different characteristics and some films are created with a high tolerance for pushing.

    Its usually used when you are stuck in situation and need to get photos but don't have the right film speed available.
    WTB Manfrotto RC4 L Bracket

  4. #4

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    It may not be necessary to push or pull actually.
    Colour negative films have pretty wide exposure latitude -- they retain a lot of detail even when overexposed or underexposed. They are more tolerant to overexposure (2, or even 3 stops), than to underexposure (1, maybe 2 stops). +2 to -1 stop would let you expose your ISO 400 film anywhere from ISO 100 to 800.
    As Catchlights mentioned, push/pull processing is more expensive, and affects all exposures on the roll.
    Do note that if you use the exposure latitude this way, you have less room for error (e.g. accidentally underexposing when shooting at ISO800) cause you're already at the limits.

    If you want to push/pull for effect, that's a different matter of course

  5. #5

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Hey guys, thanks for taking the time to respond to my query!

    I initially thought this was a simple function that would only affect the amount of light that goes onto the film, but it seems like there is so much more to it. I only process my photos at those neighbourhood shops (no cash for the pro ones) so this seems like one function that I cannot use yet ><

  6. #6
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by metzalx View Post
    Hey guys, thanks for taking the time to respond to my query!

    I initially thought this was a simple function that would only affect the amount of light that goes onto the film, but it seems like there is so much more to it. I only process my photos at those neighbourhood shops (no cash for the pro ones) so this seems like one function that I cannot use yet ><
    You can process at Ruby photo in Peninsular. I think they do push processing...

  7. #7
    Member agws1970's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North East Singapore
    Posts
    365

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    There is not much use for this in colour negative films but it used to be recommended for Slides where if you over expose a 400 roll at 200 you get richer colours. reason being that when you print from neg film, the printing actually negates the effect. Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    Deregistered shaoken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Clementi/West Coast
    Posts
    2,115

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Francis View Post
    It may not be necessary to push or pull actually.
    Colour negative films have pretty wide exposure latitude -- they retain a lot of detail even when overexposed or underexposed. They are more tolerant to overexposure (2, or even 3 stops), than to underexposure (1, maybe 2 stops). +2 to -1 stop would let you expose your ISO 400 film anywhere from ISO 100 to 800.
    As Catchlights mentioned, push/pull processing is more expensive, and affects all exposures on the roll.
    Do note that if you use the exposure latitude this way, you have less room for error (e.g. accidentally underexposing when shooting at ISO800) cause you're already at the limits.

    If you want to push/pull for effect, that's a different matter of course
    For this, I agree. For -1 or +1, you can adjust in Photoshop yourself.
    But sometimes, some details may be lost.

  9. #9
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,901

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by agws1970 View Post
    There is not much use for this in colour negative films but it used to be recommended for Slides where if you over expose a 400 roll at 200 you get richer colours. reason being that when you print from neg film, the printing actually negates the effect. Hope this helps.
    this is incorrect, for positive film, we usually expose for highlight details, as once the highlight is blown, detail is gone, some most people will underexpose slide film 1/2 stop to 2/3 stop to get more richer colors,
    for negative film is the other way round, we expose for shadow details, as once the shadow is block up, details is gone, since negative film have large exposure latitude, we usually overexposed it by one stop, and able to get more saturated color as well.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  10. #10

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    Quote Originally Posted by agws1970 View Post
    There is not much use for this in colour negative films but it used to be recommended for Slides where if you over expose a 400 roll at 200 you get richer colours. reason being that when you print from neg film, the printing actually negates the effect. Hope this helps.
    No, for slides, underexpose for deep saturated colors, for negatives, overexpose for richer vibrant colors.
    WTB Manfrotto RC4 L Bracket

  11. #11
    Member agws1970's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North East Singapore
    Posts
    365

    Default Re: Film: Effects of manual ISO override?

    sorry, haven't shot film for a while. got it mixed over. Hehe.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •