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Thread: black foreground & a bright nicely exposed background

  1. #1
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    Post black foreground & a bright nicely exposed background

    it is possible to have a completely black foreground and a bright background even though there is not much exposure difference between the two?

    i find that normally it is taken with some dark foreground and the bright sky as the background.. it is because there must be a big exposure difference before the effect can be achieve?

    wat is the effect called?? hahaz..

    is ND filter needed for such an effect?
    Any tips on how to take these photos?

  2. #2

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    it's called the silohoute (spelling? )

  3. #3

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    Silhouette

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Echo22
    it is possible to have a completely black foreground and a bright background even though there is not much exposure difference between the two?

    i find that normally it is taken with some dark foreground and the bright sky as the background.. it is because there must be a big exposure difference before the effect can be achieve?

    wat is the effect called?? hahaz..

    is ND filter needed for such an effect?
    Any tips on how to take these photos?
    get your subject to stand in a shaded area against a dark foreground. one thing you can start trying is placed your subject next to a window on a bright day. meter the background basicly.

  5. #5
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    i tried by taking the background reading and sometimes even putting it one exposure stop higher but still the foreground is quite bright.. can see the color which makes it sux..

    haha.. ya Silhouette.. i juz cannot remember the name.. thankz Belle&Sebastain & arikevin!!

  6. #6

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    U should meter the subject. Use spot or center weight metering. I prefer spot.

    Look:


  7. #7

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    Echo22 wants a silhouette, not a properly exposed foreground.

  8. #8

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    the background and the subject must have a considerable exposure difference.

  9. #9
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    have a look at photographic.com? they have an excellent write-up on shooting silhouette. that article is definitely going into my scrapbook!
    If Life worked on auto mode then manual mode for photography would have never existed. ― Deeksha Mittal

  10. #10

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    At least 3 stops of difference.

  11. #11
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    silhouette - Meter on the sky, set the shutter speed to match. Focus on foreground.

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  13. #13

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    This is mine. Used Matrix.

    http://www.pbase.com/image/31689792

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    Anyway there is no way to achieve both objects (fore and background) evenly exposed right? One of them must give in right?

    I often have problems shooting in daytime with my 300d. The sky often overexposed which lost all the details of the cloud and blue sky. Solution : Use polariser or reduce the f-stop?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman
    Anyway there is no way to achieve both objects (fore and background) evenly exposed right? One of them must give in right?

    I often have problems shooting in daytime with my 300d. The sky often overexposed which lost all the details of the cloud and blue sky. Solution : Use polariser or reduce the f-stop?
    Umm....in daytime, use fill flash lar. Or orientate your subject properly so that more reflected light reaches it (if possible).

    This deals with dynamic range. Nope, there is no way. Even film has a max of around 5 stops. Gotta match it.

  16. #16

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    perhaps this is wat u are talking about??


  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman
    Anyway there is no way to achieve both objects (fore and background) evenly exposed right? One of them must give in right?

    I often have problems shooting in daytime with my 300d. The sky often overexposed which lost all the details of the cloud and blue sky. Solution : Use polariser or reduce the f-stop?
    the foregorund/ subject has to stay silhouetted, hence the name, if you want to achieve both objects evenly lit, its just called fill in flash.

    you can reduce your f-stop smaller, basically meter the sky.

  18. #18
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    2100 is right. Roughly 3 stops will get you a sihlouette. Tho here's a 5 stop underexposed one.



    Regards
    CK

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2100
    Umm....in daytime, use fill flash lar. Or orientate your subject properly so that more reflected light reaches it (if possible).

    This deals with dynamic range. Nope, there is no way. Even film has a max of around 5 stops. Gotta match it.
    Negative film actually has > 5 stops dynamic range. Slides have similar dynamic range to digital, about 4-5 stops. Even if you can capture say 10 stop dynamic range, prints have a much smaller dynamic range, so something will give way when you get it printed.

    Regards
    CK

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ckiang
    Negative film actually has > 5 stops dynamic range.
    CK
    Actually, when people say that, does it mean that on a light table, you can actually see from the darkest shadows and still maintain highlight detail? Or say that 7 stops (for eg) means the lab can compensate accordingly and pull out detail (either they compensate for underexposure by 3 stops or overexposure by 3 stops, but not both at the same time) but still cannot display that 7 stops in real life?
    Coz 5 stops is already a lot of difference for our eyes.

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