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Thread: shooting studio type of portraiture

  1. #1

    Default shooting studio type of portraiture

    shooting studio type of portraiture

    how many shoot more with 70-200 f4 or f2.8

    and how many shoot with shorter but brighter lens?

  2. #2

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    Both lens should be ok on a ff body at the 70mm end. On a cropped body, fov may be too tight for full body shots, perhaps 3/4 or 1/2 length shots.

    I personally prefer primes due to better resolving power and the weight factor (shooting 1-2 hours on 70-200 can be tiring)

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkins
    Both lens should be ok on a ff body at the 70mm end. On a cropped body, fov may be too tight for full body shots, perhaps 3/4 or 1/2 length shots.

    I personally prefer primes due to better resolving power and the weight factor (shooting 1-2 hours on 70-200 can be tiring)
    Another factor is the size of the studio

  4. #4
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by lhc500d View Post
    shooting studio type of portraiture

    how many shoot more with 70-200 f4 or f2.8

    and how many shoot with shorter but brighter lens?
    Depends on size of studio, which affects how far you can go back.
    Dunno what camera you own. Can only assume from your nickname that it's C500D, which is a crop-factor camera.
    70-200 seems kinda tight. If standing about 3-5m away, probably 40 to 85mm kinda range is suitable for a crop factor cam.
    And because mostly shot at about f/8 or thereabouts, no real need for the fancy glass unless you are very demanding of your image quality (eg. professional production).
    Exploring! :)

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    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    And because mostly shot at about f/8 or thereabouts, no real need for the fancy glass unless you are very demanding of your image quality (eg. professional production).
    correct... u dun need bright glass (also known as wider apertures).

    cos u will most probably shoot in manual f8 1/125-1/160... pretty standard

    btw using 135mm on a FF body, i already have difficulty shooting a full body length... cos i had to stand at the other corner of the studio to shoot that lol and the studio i shoot in is very big (those JTC flatted factory office space size)... so good luck if u are shooting in a small studio, u may even have difficulty doing focusing cos u are not standing far enough to meet the min focusing distance using a 70-200 on a crop body.

    so go with shorter focal length (primes will be useful or even your kit lens 18-55), like 35mm or 50mm since you are on crop.
    Last edited by sinned79; 3rd February 2011 at 10:24 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    correct... u dun need bright glass (also known as wider apertures).

    cos u will most probably shoot in manual f8 1/125-1/160... pretty standard

    btw using 135mm on a FF body, i already have difficulty shooting a full body length... cos i had to stand at the other corner of the studio to shoot that lol and the studio i shoot in is very big (those JTC flatted factory office space size)... so good luck if u are shooting in a small studio, u may even have difficulty doing focusing cos u are not standing far enough to meet the min focusing distance using a 70-200 on a crop body.

    so go with shorter focal length (primes will be useful or even your kit lens 18-55), like 35mm or 50mm since you are on crop.
    thank u for your advices, but if i do shoot dance, does "faster" glasses allow more accurate focusing? i hrd 85mm f2.8 that piece (if i didnt remember wrongly) is best for fast focus.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    You're trying to photograph a subject that's dancing in a photo studio?

    If subject is moving more or less perpendicular to you (ie staying on the same plane of focus), don't need to worry too much abt fast AF.
    I still think 85mm in a studio is too tight. If dancing subject, I would assume you want a wider angle to show the graceful movement.
    Exploring! :)

  8. #8

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    You're trying to photograph a subject that's dancing in a photo studio?

    If subject is moving more or less perpendicular to you (ie staying on the same plane of focus), don't need to worry too much abt fast AF.
    I still think 85mm in a studio is too tight. If dancing subject, I would assume you want a wider angle to show the graceful movement.
    paiseh i didnt say that dancing and studio is 2 different kind, dance fotography is sort of one of my fav type of fotos

  9. #9
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by lhc500d View Post
    paiseh i didnt say that dancing and studio is 2 different kind, dance fotography is sort of one of my fav type of fotos
    as mentioned by ZCA, a wide angle is more suitable to capture the movement.

    why not u ask your sibling be your model in your room, then use the same lens try see if u can capture the whole body of your sibling.

    a typical studio is about 1.5 - 2.5 times of your room size.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by lhc500d View Post
    paiseh i didnt say that dancing and studio is 2 different kind, dance fotography is sort of one of my fav type of fotos
    perhaps you can post up a photo of what you're trying to capture, so that everyone here can have a better idea of the environment and so on.
    Doesn't matter if it's blurry or whatever, but at least can get a better idea.


    for example, are you trying to photograph something like this?

    from http://www.shedelphotocourse.com/img...277af40338.jpg
    Exploring! :)

  11. #11

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    f/2.8 or f/4 is not important if you are shooting in studios. You are not gonna do bokehs or whatever out of focus anyway.

    Perhaps a 17-55 on crop body and 24-70 on FF would be good. For me, 35mm and 135mm primes are the way to go !
    Think fast, aim for the best !

  12. #12

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    If shooting dance, I think u will need to worry more about getting a really large studio with powerful enough strobes, plus using a wide enough light source eg sun umbrella if the dancer is doing a considerable amount of movement across or up/down.

    Having said that, back to ur question of 70-200 f2.8 vs f4, are u planning to get either one of these? Or u have the f4 and planning to upgrade to f2.8? If u plan to shoot alot of portraiture, it is worthwhile to get the 85mm or 100mm. Otherwise, if just for one or two studio sessions, i think u can stick to ur 70-200.

  13. #13

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    not sure how frequent about studio shoot yet, but should be picking up more and more. location wise the studio is a quick set up at home itself, but the size may change.

  14. #14

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    Are you using strobes or off cam flashes btw?
    cuiusvis hominis est errare, nullius nisi insipientis in errore perseverare

  15. #15

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    FL depends a lot on the size (esp. length) of your studio.
    Typically a 50mm will suffice (~2-2.5m for head shoulder shots). 85mm you will need to stand about 3.5-4m away and so on. So how far can you afford to stand from the subject?


    Are you shooting studio style portraits with lighting equipment or shooting in a dance studio?
    For the former, lenses are usually stopped down for maximum sharpness, so a fast lens is not absolutely necessary. For the latter, a fast zoom will give you versatility. Expect to use higher ISO if using natural lighting indoors.

  16. #16

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by pinholecam View Post
    FL depends a lot on the size (esp. length) of your studio.
    Typically a 50mm will suffice (~2-2.5m for head shoulder shots). 85mm you will need to stand about 3.5-4m away and so on. So how far can you afford to stand from the subject?


    Are you shooting studio style portraits with lighting equipment or shooting in a dance studio?
    For the former, lenses are usually stopped down for maximum sharpness, so a fast lens is not absolutely necessary. For the latter, a fast zoom will give you versatility. Expect to use higher ISO if using natural lighting indoors.
    thank u again for those who come in to advice and share. really appreciate it.



    4-5m max but i have other location to shoot as well.
    Last edited by lhc500d; 16th February 2011 at 03:38 PM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    50mm for me.

  18. #18

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    I hover between 35mm to 85mm for my studio shots.

  19. #19
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by Blur Shadow View Post
    I hover between 35mm to 85mm for my studio shots.
    need your advise... i find 35mm (on FF), kinda wide in studio (maybe not all studi0 but at least the one i used so far)... let say if i still shoot as per normal... but crop out the excess, will this affects those lighting ratio in the photo? rightfully not right? hope you understand what i am trying to ask cos i find it hard to explain in words

  20. #20

    Default Re: shooting studio type of portraiture

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    need your advise... i find 35mm (on FF), kinda wide in studio (maybe not all studi0 but at least the one i used so far)... let say if i still shoot as per normal... but crop out the excess, will this affects those lighting ratio in the photo? rightfully not right? hope you understand what i am trying to ask cos i find it hard to explain in words
    Hey there!

    I'm no great expert in this aspect, but if I understand you correctly, I don't think there will be a significant effect.

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