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Thread: Shooting indoor setting

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    Default Shooting indoor setting

    Hi, can you guys share some tips on what setting do you guys normally set on your camera for indoor studio shooting? I can't seem to lock an auto focus on a subject due to darkness before I fire my flash strobe (which explains why) or is it normally used manual focus for studio photographers? My camera setting would be 1/160, f 5.6. I'm using a canon 50mm f 1.4. I don't have a light meter yet, so I can't do an accurate adjustment to my camera to work well with my strobe outcome.
    Last edited by Oberfeldwebel; 31st January 2011 at 06:16 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting indoor setting

    Quote Originally Posted by Oberfeldwebel View Post
    Hi, can you guys share some tips on what setting do you guys normally set on your camera for indoor studio shooting? I can't seem to lock an auto focus on a subject due to darkness before I fire my flash strobe (which explains why) or is it normally used manual focus for studio photographers? My camera setting would be 1/160, f 5.6. I'm using a canon 50mm f 1.4. I don't have a light meter yet, so I can't do an accurate adjustment to my camera to work well with my strobe outcome.
    your setting sounds like "more or less" there, but a lot depends on the output power of your strobes, and how far they are from subject, and how far you are from subject as well.

    Light intensity reduces in an 'inverse-square' relationship with distance.
    Without light meter, it's a bit of gut feel and trial and error. After all you have LCD screen for instant playback, so should be no issue.

    As for AF... if you turn on the modelling lights, AF should be able to lock-on.
    Exploring! :)

  3. #3

    Default Re: Shooting indoor setting

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    your setting sounds like "more or less" there, but a lot depends on the output power of your strobes, and how far they are from subject, and how far you are from subject as well.

    Light intensity reduces in an 'inverse-square' relationship with distance.
    Without light meter, it's a bit of gut feel and trial and error. After all you have LCD screen for instant playback, so should be no issue.

    As for AF... if you turn on the modelling lights, AF should be able to lock-on.
    Hi ZerocoolAstra, thanks for your wonderful tips. I had forgotten that one should take advantages for all the aspect that he/she has and as for me, i should have use modelling light which i have forgotten about it. Yes you're correct about not having a light meter, it's a bit of gut feel. Just a thought that came on my mind, maybe i could try analyze each of my individual strobe flash by shooting one at a time and review back at histogram? to check on the levels? isn't that what we do when we shoot outdoor so that i could actually determine right exposure? afterall shooting strobe means you are in full control of the light outcome right?

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    Member makolit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting indoor setting

    Quote Originally Posted by Oberfeldwebel View Post
    Just a thought that came on my mind, maybe i could try analyze each of my individual strobe flash by shooting one at a time and review back at histogram? to check on the levels? isn't that what we do when we shoot outdoor so that i could actually determine right exposure? afterall shooting strobe means you are in full control of the light outcome right?
    mate, this will work for a subject that is stationary (i.e. still life) and if you have time to check your settings. very different if you will be shooting a living, breathing model in lingerie as you have the model to think about.

    similarly, for outdoor shoots, you cannot control the sun, so you have to regularly adjust your settings. i don't think you'll have enough time to check the histogram for analysis on the exposure.

    cheers!
    is using a digital camera that works ...

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    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting indoor setting

    Quote Originally Posted by Oberfeldwebel View Post
    Hi ZerocoolAstra, thanks for your wonderful tips. I had forgotten that one should take advantages for all the aspect that he/she has and as for me, i should have use modelling light which i have forgotten about it. Yes you're correct about not having a light meter, it's a bit of gut feel. Just a thought that came on my mind, maybe i could try analyze each of my individual strobe flash by shooting one at a time and review back at histogram? to check on the levels? isn't that what we do when we shoot outdoor so that i could actually determine right exposure? afterall shooting strobe means you are in full control of the light outcome right?
    you're welcome
    Glad I could help in some way.

    Your idea about shooting individually and then reading the histogram is interesting. I never thought about it that way. Bear in mind that the histogram will probably look different for different lighting effects. If you just wanna check for blown highlights, then yeah I guess so.

    I believe (dunno right or wrong) in starting with a single light first, then placing it and adjusting to get more or less the main effect that you're after. Following which, additional lights/reflectors are used to enhance this effect, eg. for catchlights in the eyes, or flooding the background to make it white, or adding rim lighting to the hair, etc.

    We have total control of the light only in an indoor studio where you can kill off the ambient light.
    If outdoors, should be much more tricky.
    Exploring! :)

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    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Always start out setting your exposure to the key light. As you add more lights, you just need to fine tune as needed.

    When setting up lights, it makes more sense to set up with 1 light first (key). Then as you want more, add one by one.

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