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Thread: Black and White film processing course (4th intake)

  1. #1

    Default Black and White film processing course (4th intake)

    For those who are interested in developing your own black and white negatives, Stanley Lim Colour Centre is opening up registration for 4th intake now. The course will start on 4th August 04.

    I would highly recommend this course to anyone who are interested to develop their own b+w films. For more information on this course, you can contact Joanne on 98583502.

  2. #2

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    In addition, Stanley Lim Colour Centre is requesting for feedback from previous students of this course. Be it positive or negative remarks, just write it here. However, if you are feeling uncomfortable with posting comments/feedback about the course in the public forum, feel free to PM Stanley Lim himself (nick is Toto38). All feedback will be greatly appreciated.

    Let the feedback roll!

  3. #3

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    will Stanley Lim Colour Centre be kind enough to offer the service of a Darkroom for those who attended the course then?
    or will it be a DIY end course that user can do it @ home.

  4. #4

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    hello,

    black and white film processing doNT really require a darkroom. so i expect that it's a DIY at home

    edited: typed too fast... hee
    Last edited by mervlam; 25th July 2004 at 06:58 PM.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tucker
    will Stanley Lim Colour Centre be kind enough to offer the service of a Darkroom for those who attended the course then?
    or will it be a DIY end course that user can do it @ home.
    Processing the film do not require darkroom, printing the film does.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam
    hello,

    black and white film processing do really require a darkroom. so i expect that it's a DIY at home
    Where did you get that from?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by blurblock
    Where did you get that from?
    Reading the context of his message, I think he meant "black and white film processing don't really require a darkroom. so i expect that it's a DIY at home".

  8. #8

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    processing and developing the film dont really need a dark room, cos at a later stage the film has to be put into a tumbler and then oscalliated in it with a fixer. Its the extraction of the film that you got to do it in a very dark place, there should not even be any lights flooding into the room, and the only place is a dark room, or at hme u got a place where it is so dark and the doors are tightly fitted to block out excessive lights flooding in. Thats the experince i had, during my shcool days for black and white photography.

  9. #9

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    the implication of my earlier message is that while I pay to learn elsewhere, I am guaranteed the usage of a darkroom which will facilitate my printing needs.

    surely everyone who intend to develop their own film might want to print their own prints sooner or later ?

    so if Stanley Lim Colour Centre doesn't provide a darkroom, will they be touching on the more technical aspect such as varying the chemical content and ratio? if so then will they also point out to where we can acquire the extra chemicals then?

    if so then i might be keen on it

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by tucker
    the implication of my earlier message is that while I pay to learn elsewhere, I am guaranteed the usage of a darkroom which will facilitate my printing needs.

    surely everyone who intend to develop their own film might want to print their own prints sooner or later ?

    so if Stanley Lim Colour Centre doesn't provide a darkroom, will they be touching on the more technical aspect such as varying the chemical content and ratio? if so then will they also point out to where we can acquire the extra chemicals then?

    if so then i might be keen on it
    For more information, perhaps you can look up the previous thread for more details. Stanley Lim will only be teaching on the processing part but not the printing part. For the darkroom, you can always rent the darkroom from elsewhere. As for the varying of chemical ratio, he will also touch on it in the course in detail. He will be using his own special technique to process the negatives.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilblackbox
    Its the extraction of the film that you got to do it in a very dark place, there should not even be any lights flooding into the room, and the only place is a dark room, or at hme u got a place where it is so dark and the doors are tightly fitted to block out excessive lights flooding in...
    I process my films in full daylight!

    YOU DONT NEED A DARKROOM TO PROCESS FILMS!

    What you need is a changing bag that is light-proof. You put your films, reels, tanks, etc, in the changing bag. You "extract" the films from its container (35mm) and then load them on to the reels in the changing bag. Then put the reels in the tanks, put on the lid, and remove the tanks from the bag! It is that simple!

    In fact I don't even "extract" the 35 mm film. I just remove a side of the film container, plop out the film, snip the edges and then load the films on to the reels.

    Voila! the films are ready for developing in broad daylight!

  12. #12

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    A clarification.

    I am assuming that you are talking about 35 mm and 120/220 films.

    For sheet processing using tray developing, dip and dunk, developing by inspection etc you do need a COMPLETELY DARK DARKROOM, even more dark than for printing! Unless or course you have access to, or own sophisticated automated drum roller systems such as the JOBO.

  13. #13
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    Erm a quick question: how long is the course?

  14. #14

    Default Black and White processing course

    Stanley's course includes the equipments that you will need to process your own B/W film at home. he also teaches his own special technique of developing where all you need is about 15 mins of time and you will be able to see what you have taken with your camera. I highly recommend this course.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by kim8luv
    Stanley's course includes the equipments that you will need to process your own B/W film at home. he also teaches his own special technique of developing where all you need is about 15 mins of time and you will be able to see what you have taken with your camera. I highly recommend this course.
    I do not know Stanley or his course.

    I do not want to make negative comments on his course or special techniques. I am sure that Stanley will teach many useful things to attendees.

    But I do not think that 15 minutes is anything special.

    I get to see my Ilford panf negatives in less than 10 minutes from the time I pour in my developer. But I cheat! The actual duration from pouring the developer to the rinse depends a lot on the film and the developer used. Some films/developer combo just take a long time to develop! But for my Ilford panf , I can actually reduce the time even further by increasing the temperature.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by student
    I process my films in full daylight!

    YOU DONT NEED A DARKROOM TO PROCESS FILMS!

    What you need is a changing bag that is light-proof. You put your films, reels, tanks, etc, in the changing bag. You "extract" the films from its container (35mm) and then load them on to the reels in the changing bag. Then put the reels in the tanks, put on the lid, and remove the tanks from the bag! It is that simple!

    In fact I don't even "extract" the 35 mm film. I just remove a side of the film container, plop out the film, snip the edges and then load the films on to the reels.

    Voila! the films are ready for developing in broad daylight!
    To you is simple , but not the beginer like me . I don't know what you talking about , i wanted to learn B&W processing or can you teach me ??? cause i can scan into my computer and choose the pic. i don need dark room to print lah ! no time for printing

  17. #17

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by rz67
    To you is simple , but not the beginer like me . I don't know what you talking about , i wanted to learn B&W processing or can you teach me ??? cause i can scan into my computer and choose the pic. i don need dark room to print lah ! no time for printing
    If you don't mind learning from a non-professional ( I am a rank & file amateur), send me a PM with your contact (mobile/email) , and we can arrange for a session.

  18. #18

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    Hello guys,

    Snazzy here. Thought i would come in here to find out more about this course. I personally think there's enough testosterone spraying on the walls of this thread already.

    I know quite a bit of photography from my husband, and we like to go out and take pictures together, process film together, and learn together. What i'm trying to say is that it's so much fun to learn as a group.

    While i can understand that some who learn about B&W processing may need a darkroom, it may not be economically feasible for an instructor to provide one. If there's an overwhelming request and constant demand for it, then i agree, there should be one provided. However, printing of photos is another story. Most of us don't have the time or patience to stay in a darkroom for hours. So, perhaps it might be better if Stanley's students could group together and RENT ONE! Wouldn't that be a better option than to rant and rave about why there isn't one provided?

    As for touting for students in someone elses' thread; STUDENT, i don't think that's right at all. Perhaps your intentions are pure, and if so, perhaps you'd like to start a course on your very own. It seems commendable that a non-professional like yourself is willing to impart knowledge to those willing to learn, and i certainly respect you for that. 15mins may not be special in terms of processing time, but neither is 10mins. Those who are knowledgable about processing already know that processing times can be shortened via the increase in chemical temperature, hence the use of a thermometer.

    Whatever the case is, before i start another flaming war, let us leave this thread for its intended purposes.

  19. #19

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    student: I would appreciate you would at least respect the thread starter or Stanley Lim Color Center. If you wish to conduct any lessons or ask ppl to learn from you, do so in your own thread or PM them. It is unethical to do what you are doing above.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by justarius
    Erm a quick question: how long is the course?
    The course runs for 4 lessons in total.

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