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Thread: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

  1. #61

    Default Re: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

    Quote Originally Posted by cqprime View Post
    Thanks for sharing, yours was done in government hospitals?

    " (yah, now they MRI-ed my back and found some disc bulging pressing on some nerve which might be ONE of the cause of pain in the first place *smacks forehead*)"

    So in the end they found the back bone disc slipped and i am glad you r getting the treatment u need.

    I find because in government hospital u r referred to multiple doctors...it takes a very sharp doctor to assess and conclude your problem.

    Yah.. you guessed it, government hospitals. I guess I refuse to pay premiums for private consultation. And I'm glad I didn't (okok, those times I complained about pain I was near to curses). For example, I had my MRI done for my back and it cost about $300+, I saw the bill and was so so relieved that is because I'm subsidised. Else, the full cost is $700+. gosh. (and this is still diagnosis stage!) - I had a MRI done for my knee which cost me $400+ (weird why it's more ex then my back one) and it came back with no abnormal findings - imagine the bewilderment for me. And of course frustration that I can't pin point the problems yet then!

    But, my case is really a complicated one.. Don't think my back issue is the ONLY cause to my knee pain. oh well, I'll leave the "doctor-ing" to the doctors. And yah, disadvantages (HUGE), is the non fixed doctor(s) I get. But I'm getting used to it Just know what you seek and ask ask ask if you're unclear or want to find out more. Don't be pushed around by the doctors (i've had some parts of these as well). I had to insist and persist so many times.

    In short, can die, but cannot fall ill.
    Licence to shoot.

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

    It is true we need to know our rights and be proactive in pushing the doctors for alternative and treatment options. Singapore medical system is already good and competent as i experience it myself. It is just very unfortunate my family member case was too complex and in the end when the HEAD consultant says he cant do much....it leave the family no choice but to seek treatment elsewhere.

    Diff doctors = u have to repeat yourself all over again. sian




    Quote Originally Posted by xhui View Post
    Yah.. you guessed it, government hospitals. I guess I refuse to pay premiums for private consultation. And I'm glad I didn't (okok, those times I complained about pain I was near to curses). For example, I had my MRI done for my back and it cost about $300+, I saw the bill and was so so relieved that is because I'm subsidised. Else, the full cost is $700+. gosh. (and this is still diagnosis stage!) - I had a MRI done for my knee which cost me $400+ (weird why it's more ex then my back one) and it came back with no abnormal findings - imagine the bewilderment for me. And of course frustration that I can't pin point the problems yet then!

    But, my case is really a complicated one.. Don't think my back issue is the ONLY cause to my knee pain. oh well, I'll leave the "doctor-ing" to the doctors. And yah, disadvantages (HUGE), is the non fixed doctor(s) I get. But I'm getting used to it Just know what you seek and ask ask ask if you're unclear or want to find out more. Don't be pushed around by the doctors (i've had some parts of these as well). I had to insist and persist so many times.

    In short, can die, but cannot fall ill.
    5D MKII,1000D,16-35mm f/2.8 L USMII,75-300mm,18-55mm,EF 50mm f/1.8 II,EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  3. #63
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    Default Re: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

    Jan 26, 2011
    Puzzled by spike in unsubsidised items for C-class patients

    I AM puzzled by the Ministry of Health's (MOH) remarks that the almost doubling on the high end of the average bill for a subsidised C-class patient in a public hospital in the four years since 2006 is partly due to patients asking for non-subsidised drugs and implants ('Jump in hospital bills over past four years'; Jan 8).
    How would patients know to ask for non-subsidised drugs and implants? Aren't these in the treatment guidelines of the hospital, which doctors are duty-bound to inform their patients?
    Has the number and proportion of non-subsidised items in C-class been increasing over the years?
    The MOH statistics provided show that average surgical bills have increased by at least 50 per cent at six out of the seven public hospitals.
    In my volunteer work doing financial counselling for the needy, I have come across C-class bills of around $90,000, for just over a month's stay in public hospitals. Since C-class is already the cheapest hospitalisation option for Singaporeans, and non-subsidised items are also generally not covered by CPF-approved medical insurance, the trend of increasing health-care costs and non-subsidised items may pose an increasing financial strain on patients and their family members.
    What are MOH's plans to address this problem?

    Leong Sze Hian

    ______________________________

    Feb 2, 2011
    Class C wards are highly affordable

    MR LEONG Sze Hian seemed to disbelieve that C-class patients would know to ask for non- subsidised drugs and implants ('Puzzled by spike in unsubsidised items for C-class patients'; last Wednesday).
    There was a time when C-class patients were largely lowly educated and ignorant of treatment options. This has changed over the years.
    Many subsidised patients are now well-read and often come with Internet printouts about alternative treatment options. We welcome this development as better informed patients can participate more actively in their treatment, especially where lifestyle changes can make a critical difference to their health outcome.
    With more than 42 per cent of all admissions to restructured hospitals opting for Class C wards, many are clearly not from low-income families.
    To keep health-care costs low, our policy is to prescribe standard drugs and cost-effective implants for our subsidised patients. However, where the patients have expressed a strong preference for such non-standard items despite knowing that they will have to pay for them, we will meet their requests. They assess that they can afford these non-subsidised drugs and implants as they are covered by both Medisave and MediShield, subject to certain limits.
    The reality is that Class C wards are highly affordable. Where is the evidence?
    The average Class C hospital bill is about $1,600, equivalent to less than one week of the average household income. Eight out of 10 Class C hospital bills are fully covered by Medisave withdrawal limits. With MediShield, the vast majority of Class C patients do not have to pay anything out of pocket.
    Mr Leong cited a $90,000 Class C bill. Such bills are rare and are usually the result of very long stays in the intensive care unit. The rational way to protect against such a catastrophic event is insurance. MediShield offers such coverage at very affordable prices.
    Where patients have no or insufficient insurance coverage, we still have Medifund as a last resort.
    Our 3Ms (Medisave, Medi- Shield, Medifund) approach to financing health care is the correct answer to rising expectations for high-quality health care.
    Patients can do their part by staying within 3Ms and accepting their doctors' prescription of lower-cost alternatives. Most Singaporeans do.

    Karen Tan (Ms)
    Director, Corporate Communications
    Ministry of Health

    Extracted from Straits Times
    5D MKII,1000D,16-35mm f/2.8 L USMII,75-300mm,18-55mm,EF 50mm f/1.8 II,EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  4. #64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cqprime
    It is true we need to know our rights and be proactive in pushing the doctors for alternative and treatment options. Singapore medical system is already good and competent as i experience it myself. It is just very unfortunate my family member case was too complex and in the end when the HEAD consultant says he cant do much....it leave the family no choice but to seek treatment elsewhere.

    Diff doctors = u have to repeat yourself all over again. sian
    Yah, if you don't have OBVIOUS symptom(s), different doctors might go merry go round to find the right diagnosis.

    Aiyah I get tired of repeating myself and tell them read their file

    Let's wish for best of health this bunny year!
    Licence to shoot.

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

    "Many subsidised patients are now well-read and often come with Internet printouts about alternative treatment options."

    "To keep health-care costs low, our policy is to prescribe standard drugs and cost-effective implants for our subsidised patients. However, where the patients have expressed a strong preference for such non-standard items despite knowing that they will have to pay for them, we will meet their requests."


    Now i know why a class C ward can incur such a high bill, due to use of non standard medicine. thats why when i see a Class C ward bill is 147k omg! how come
    5D MKII,1000D,16-35mm f/2.8 L USMII,75-300mm,18-55mm,EF 50mm f/1.8 II,EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  6. #66
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    Default Re: Why people talk of treatment at private hospital?

    Wishing all members reading this thread a HAPPY CHINESE NEW YEAR...

    May you huat huat huat for THU toto $800k
    5D MKII,1000D,16-35mm f/2.8 L USMII,75-300mm,18-55mm,EF 50mm f/1.8 II,EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

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