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Thread: Green bananas

  1. #21
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    Jan 2004
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    Sinagpore
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    Quote Originally Posted by zekai
    clive: you got a problem?

    dennis: you really should not be drinking from an old coconut...

    hmm...i'm sure i am not drinking old coconut...so i did some internet research...here's what i found:

    http://www.ambergriscaye.com/cocopalms/palmtype.html


  2. #22

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    The tall coconut trees are the most common ones. Not sure whether the yellow fruit of the dwarf varieties is edible.

    The green coconuts are the young ones. The water is sweet, and the flesh is translucent and soft. So these are for drinking.

    If they are not plucked, they eventually ripen and turn brown, before dropping. You can use them whether you pluck them from the tree or after they have dropped from the tree.

    The brown coconuts are called "old" coconuts. They are usually dehusked, and the flesh (which is thick and hard and rich with milk) is grated and squeezed to make coconut milk, which is used for cooking. The water is usually discarded, since it is sometimes semi-fermented (which is why it is occasionally fizzy, or "carbonated" as you call it). There is also usually a fairly large embryo inside the coconut (called the "heart") which is sometimes eaten. Has a nice buttery, nutty taste.

    In case you're wondering, I grew up in a house with lots of trees, including coconut trees, which I used to climb. So I am talking from first hand experience.
    Last edited by StreetShooter; 14th July 2004 at 08:33 PM.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    The tall coconut trees are the most common ones. Not sure whether the yellow fruit of the dwarf varieties is edible.

    The green coconuts are the young ones. The water is sweet, and the flesh is translucent and soft. So these are for drinking.

    If they are not plucked, they eventually ripen and turn brown, before dropping. You can use them whether you pluck them from the tree or after they have dropped from the tree.

    The brown coconuts are called "old" coconuts. They are usually dehusked, and the flesh (which is thick and hard and rich with milk) is grated and squeezed to make coconut milk, which is used for cooking. The water is usually discarded, since it is sometimes semi-fermented (which is why it is occasionally fizzy, or "carbonated" as you call it). There is also usually a fairly large embryo inside the coconut (called the "heart") which is sometimes eaten. Has a nice buttery, nutty taste.

    In case you're wondering, I grew up in a house with lots of trees, including coconut trees, which I used to climb. So I am talking from first hand experience.
    Thanks for sharing. I really love this thread.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by yeocolin
    Thanks for sharing. I really love this thread.
    did you go back to NTUC and see if the bananas are ripe?

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Sinagpore
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    The tall coconut trees are the most common ones. Not sure whether the yellow fruit of the dwarf varieties is edible.

    The green coconuts are the young ones. The water is sweet, and the flesh is translucent and soft. So these are for drinking.

    If they are not plucked, they eventually ripen and turn brown, before dropping. You can use them whether you pluck them from the tree or after they have dropped from the tree.

    The brown coconuts are called "old" coconuts. They are usually dehusked, and the flesh (which is thick and hard and rich with milk) is grated and squeezed to make coconut milk, which is used for cooking. The water is usually discarded, since it is sometimes semi-fermented (which is why it is occasionally fizzy, or "carbonated" as you call it). There is also usually a fairly large embryo inside the coconut (called the "heart") which is sometimes eaten. Has a nice buttery, nutty taste.

    In case you're wondering, I grew up in a house with lots of trees, including coconut trees, which I used to climb. So I am talking from first hand experience.

    They are not different species of coconut?

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Belle&Sebastain
    did you go back to NTUC and see if the bananas are ripe?
    No. Haha.... I need to work in the mornings.

  7. #27
    Phildate
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    If you put bananas in the refridgerator they go brown really fast. What is all that about?? You would've thought the cold would slow down ripening but just the opposite. Any explanation Zek?

  8. #28
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    May 2002
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    Singapore
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    1,719

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    is there any apple/ or ripening fruit stuff in thr fridge? ;>

    the process already start from the cutting of the banana - shipping - displaying- bring home.

    putting them back after so long is not going to help much.

  9. #29

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    organize a banana outing lah... still life one... recording the banana ripenin, would make a nice time lapse clip...

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