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Thread: Angle of View: 50mm on DSLR

  1. #1

    Default Angle of View: 50mm on DSLR

    This question has been bugging me and I hope the experts here may offer me some guidance.

    My understanding is that the 50mm Standard Lense gives the best angle of view in that it provides that most closely resembles that of the central vision of our own eyes. In other words, it provides the most natural view of many subjects.

    Now, with the crop factor in a DSLR (eg: 1.6 x), does the same still hold true? In other words, to obtain the ideal angle of view, do I still slap a 50mm prime on the DSLR although it is effectively 80mm (50 x 1.6)? Or should I get a prime close to 31.25mm (50 / 1.6)?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2

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    For cameras with the 1.5x crop, a 35mm lens would be considered as having normal field of view

  3. #3

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    the perspective will remain 35mm. if you're looking for the perspective from a 50mm, you have to use a 50mm. the crop factor does not change perspective.

  4. #4
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    Default

    i thought it only affects the FOV? the size of objects remain the same.

  5. #5
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    Default Do you know...

    Quote Originally Posted by headlesschook
    the perspective will remain 35mm. if you're looking for the perspective from a 50mm, you have to use a 50mm. the crop factor does not change perspective.
    If you are standing at a particular point A......trying out all lens from 19mm up to 500mm.....focussing on the same subject in the horizon.....your perspective will be the same......What you will get is only a cropped image as you move from the wide to tele range......(FOV changes)

    If you want to change perspective......you need to change location with the respective lens......All the myth of perspective changing by chnging lens ....is misunderstood ....


    rgds,
    sulhan
    Last edited by sulhan; 29th June 2004 at 05:10 PM.

  6. #6

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    that is also inaccurate.

    lines converge more on wide angles than on telephotos.
    what i meant was that the view you get from a long lens will still be different from a cropped image taken from a wide angle.

  7. #7

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    Let's use examples...

    Compare:
    (a) A pic taken at 50mm with a DSLR with 1.5 crop; and
    (b) A pic taken at 75mm with a 'normal' SLR.

    Exactly the same?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by KLCHUA
    Let's use examples...

    Compare:
    (a) A pic taken at 50mm with a DSLR with 1.5 crop; and
    (b) A pic taken at 75mm with a 'normal' SLR.

    Exactly the same?
    No. the subject will be larger in (b). FOV will be the same though.

  9. #9

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    Nitrile, can you explain why the subject would be bigger?

    Say, I take a picture of an book and print a 4R print. I would have thought that it the book would appear the same size when printed at 4R. Or am I completely wrong???

  10. #10

    Default

    both cases u get same angle of view.

    but

    size of film frame is 24x36mm
    size of DSLR frame is 22.7 mm x 15.1 mm (for the 1.6x crop case)


    lets say your subject occupy the whole frame when viewed with 75mm on film body. that means it occupies 24x36mm worth of area

    on DSLR with 50mm, FOV also the same. ie the same subject also occupy the whole frame. which is 22.7x15.1mm worth of area only. which is smaller than 24x36mm.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nitrile
    No. the subject will be larger in (b). FOV will be the same though.
    Yes through the viewfinders, if the two viewfinders are the same with the same maginifcation ratio. But with respect to the frame captured, the subject is the same size on both. try it and you'll know

    However, the depth of field is different for the same aperture. It's shallower for the second case.
    Last edited by mpenza; 29th June 2004 at 09:24 PM.

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