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Thread: definition of full frame

  1. #81
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by nikkie View Post
    every reference to size of sensor in still photography is made to the ISO reference. For SLR and DSLRs, the word 'full frame' means the film 135 format (24x36mm).
    It was invented/standardized by Kodak in 1934. Before that, all cameras were mostly our present day referenced medium or large format.
    So in comparison when 135 format came into the market, it became the 'small format' and was not considered suitable for professional use.
    Let's put it this way. The term SLR, or 'single lens reflex' is synonimous with the 135 standard. This means an SLR camera complies with 36mm x 24mm format. Naturally, a DSLR camera must also comply with 135 standard, otherwise is should not be called a DSLR. However, one can use ther term APS-C DSLR or cropped frame DSLR, which means that 'full frame' DSLR is just DSLR. So, if your camera does not comply with the 135 standard, can it still be called a DSLR?

    I am sure this type of discussion has been around for sometime and I don't see any real purpose for such defination in today's digital world context.
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  2. #82

    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Nonsense about a crop sensor being full frame.

    So, if I mount a DX lens on a APS-C camera, it is a FF camera. But the next instant I mount a FX lens, it is a crop camera.

    All this stems from two individuals trying to console themselves about their smaller sensors.

  3. #83
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Let people define what they want.

    Generally it refers to the frame of a 35mm film.
    36mm x 24mm

    Brands such as Canon, Nikon, Sony, etc... have digital cameras that conform to this understanding of the term full frame.

    If a brand/manufacturer made a smaller size sensor e.g.. say (exaggerate just to make the point of how silly the argument can be) 1mm x 1mm and then INSISTS that their camera is full frame and start explaining why and how they define it.

    Well....just laugh....and don't argue with them.

    It is a dead horse.
    Last edited by ricohflex; 27th November 2010 at 12:54 PM.

  4. #84
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Lee View Post
    35mm is the width of a roll of 35mm film. The 135 film standard refers to a film image size of 36mm x 24mm. Also note that 35mm film can also be used in range finders and half frame format cameras, not only 135 standard SLR cameras.
    And double frame ones too... like the Xpan.

  5. #85
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by divinemoment View Post
    ... 4/3 may become the standard for the next century. ...
    That will be very hard for DSLR... seeing where Olympus is "concentrating" their development recently....

  6. #86

    Default Re: definition of full frame

    The whole ordeal of this confusion was because the intended question was too vague. There are 2 parts to the question: What is a FF sensor and what makes a camera FF capability.

    Firstly a camera (digital or film) comprised of the camera body and the lens. No argument about it. A FF sensor is 35mm film size and once fitted into the camera = FF camera.

    The vague thing was what makes a camera FF capable. The answer is when the camera sensor can fully use a lens circle meant for 35mm and not middle section or cropped, natively without any custom adaptor. This question arised because of the variation of sensor size in digital camera (not just SLR, RF, compacts etc). Thus instead of inventing terms just for the sake of retrofiting, simply give a description will do fine but they are still "non standard". A term will be required when it has reached an industrial use or when confusion reaches a critical mass (or mess if you like ).

    SLR technology was invented by Japan (cannot remember if TLR was by Japan or Germany) and Casio invented the very first digital still camera (not Sony). The SLR was known by the mirror + penta prism (an enhancement to TLR) and not association to film size, just like TLR but because of the limited film size used by the industry in those days, there is no need to disassociate. Just like power sockets today.

    Of course when the person who posted the initial question, he/she probably attempting to interpret the terms by plain english which resulted in any frame in full.

  7. #87

    Default Re: definition of full frame

    I have honestly never heard Olympus marketing their cameras as "full frame". But then, by definition, there is nothing factually incorrect.

    Still, I think "full frame", in the photography community is just another common term that is used as a reference, since people generally acknowlege that 35mm sensors are supposedly full frame. For the minority that wish to argue- well, they are at the losing end in terms of communicating their ideas.
    Olympian

  8. #88

    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    That will be very hard for DSLR... seeing where Olympus is "concentrating" their development recently....
    My comments was highly speculative and more a tongue in cheek for those brain still hard.

  9. #89
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by candycaine View Post
    I have honestly never heard Olympus marketing their cameras as "full frame". But then, by definition, there is nothing factually incorrect.

    Still, I think "full frame", in the photography community is just another common term that is used as a reference, since people generally acknowlege that 35mm sensors are supposedly full frame. For the minority that wish to argue- well, they are at the losing end in terms of communicating their ideas.
    The reason for Olympus not marketing sd FF is simple, they natively are 4.3 but have an original accessory adapter for OM 35mm lenses. Wouldn't that be shooting themselves in the foot?

    I agree that it is futile to argue with such people as they are set in their thinking and cannot see the leaves for the trees. Just take ut as self consolation on their part.

  10. #90
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    Quote Originally Posted by spheredome View Post
    The whole ordeal of this confusion was because the intended question was too vague. There are 2 parts to the question: What is a FF sensor and what makes a camera FF capability.
    .......
    Of course when the person who posted the initial question, he/she probably attempting to interpret the terms by plain english which resulted in any frame in full.
    If you go back to the original post, it is quite clear what is being discussed.

    It is interesting in the sense that people who stood by their belief will go all out to try to interpret the question and then justify accordingly to their belief.

  11. #91
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    Default Re: definition of full frame

    I do agree that this discussion will not lead anywhere. So I will close it.

    The comments made by those folks are really with regards to the sensor filling up the image circle of the lens. Clever manipulate of words meant you can also call them full frame. You can call a Tiger a cat.

    Thanks for contributing your opinions.
    Last edited by ManWearPants; 27th November 2010 at 08:14 PM.

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