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Thread: wat filter to use?

  1. #1
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    Default wat filter to use?

    hi, i am taking pictures indoor and outdoor. Using ISO400 films. Wan to kw wat filter to use to enhance skin tones and surrounding colors.
    I already have a 1B skylight filter.
    I thought of using 81C filter, issit ok for both indoor and outdoor?

    Can u guys share ur expericence or advice? thanx......

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    hi, i am taking pictures indoor and outdoor. Using ISO400 films. Wan to kw wat filter to use to enhance skin tones and surrounding colors.
    I already have a 1B skylight filter.
    I thought of using 81C filter, issit ok for both indoor and outdoor?

    Can u guys share ur expericence or advice? thanx......
    Are you unhappy with your current filter? If not, no need to change Anyway to answer your question, you can try a polariser, which reduces glare and reflections, thus saturating colours. Don't think it has much effect on skintones though. The 81c is a bit warmer than your skylight 1B, so gives everything a warmer cast. What film are you using? Choice of film is important too.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    hi, i am taking pictures indoor and outdoor. Using ISO400 films. Wan to kw wat filter to use to enhance skin tones and surrounding colors.
    I already have a 1B skylight filter.
    I thought of using 81C filter, issit ok for both indoor and outdoor?

    Can u guys share ur expericence or advice? thanx......
    Take note that indoor fluorescent lighting might cast a green cast on your photo. Which would mean that you need fluorescent filter. But heck, no one uses a fluorescent filter.

    81C might be too hash for people with darker skin tone. Or just get any Kodak film, they seem come with a layer of warming filter.

    Cheers!

  4. #4

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    y not tru 81EF....gives REALLY WARM effects....esp for fair skinned ppl

  5. #5

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    If you're using negative films, you don't have to bother much even when you're using flash or ambience lighting. The correction can be done after shooting via the lab.

    For accurate skin-tones, as long as the negative is not severely under-exposed, it can still be salvaged.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by UY79
    Take note that indoor fluorescent lighting might cast a green cast on your photo. Which would mean that you need fluorescent filter. But heck, no one uses a fluorescent filter.

    81C might be too hash for people with darker skin tone. Or just get any Kodak film, they seem come with a layer of warming filter.

    Cheers!

    Kodak film has a layer of warming filter? issit true?......

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by justarius
    Are you unhappy with your current filter? If not, no need to change Anyway to answer your question, you can try a polariser, which reduces glare and reflections, thus saturating colours. Don't think it has much effect on skintones though. The 81c is a bit warmer than your skylight 1B, so gives everything a warmer cast. What film are you using? Choice of film is important too.

    i plan to use fuji ISO400. From reviews, it seems that fuji films hav better colors than kodak.. issit true?....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    i plan to use fuji ISO400. From reviews, it seems that fuji films hav better colors than kodak.. issit true?....
    It's all a matter of taste. There's no better colour or not. Fuji, Kodak, Konica, Agfa, etc all have different colour palettes, and even within each brand, there can be substantial differences in different series of films.

    Kodak films do generally tend to be a bit warmer than Fuji, but I don't have much experience with Kodak, so I can't exactly do a true comparison. Check here for a more informed opinion.

  9. #9

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    not only the film itself,.... the paper you use to develop the photo play an important part too.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sumball
    not only the film itself,.... the paper you use to develop the photo play an important part too.
    not only the paper itself.... the lab that you send your film to develop and print play an important part too.

  11. #11

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    Agreed! Unless you have a trustable lab and they know what you really want. Talk to the lab is very important too. Of course not those neighbourhood lab where the "ah soh" will just ignore u cos they might not know what u r talking abt.

    juz my 2 cents!

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