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Thread: Difference when viewing on LCD and on PC

  1. #1

    Default Difference when viewing on LCD and on PC

    Dunno if I'm the only guy with this problem around. But when I take a picture, it looks ok on the camera's LCD, bright with good contrast. But when I transfered over to the PC, it looks dark, or underexposed. Tried using Photoshop's auto-levels / auto-contrast but it doesn't makes much of a difference. Why is this the case? I'm using a Canon S1 IS.

    I mean if it looks ok on the LCD, why doesn't it look the same when its on the PC, shouldn't the LCD reflect the exposure setting results correctly. Anyone can help ? I'm quite new to digital photography. Thanks

  2. #2

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    you could try brightening your monitor or dimming your camera's lcd till they match.

    alternatively, you could try posting your shots up for scrutiny

  3. #3
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    from my super novice perspective...

    sometimes you have to callibrate the monitor (CRT or LCD) to match the picture. Cos the LCD on the camera is preset & you can't change the brightness of the lcd, but with monitor, some may prefer dark, some prefer light, so you have to callibrate to the standard. there is also this icm (something like a protocol) for the monitor & printer to set so as to get the same printout result on the monitor as well as printouts. there is also a professional self calibration unit, where you have to attach to your monitor & it will callibrate to the industry standard of brightness & such... (hmm btw those are too expensive for a novice like me, besides... i dun own those super high end monitors)
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zedwerkz
    Dunno if I'm the only guy with this problem around. But when I take a picture, it looks ok on the camera's LCD, bright with good contrast. But when I transfered over to the PC, it looks dark, or underexposed. Tried using Photoshop's auto-levels / auto-contrast but it doesn't makes much of a difference. Why is this the case? I'm using a Canon S1 IS.

    I mean if it looks ok on the LCD, why doesn't it look the same when its on the PC, shouldn't the LCD reflect the exposure setting results correctly. Anyone can help ? I'm quite new to digital photography. Thanks
    Don't bother getting a good match between the camera LCD and your PC. You can't really gauge the outcome of your pics from the LCD.

  5. #5

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    Colourspace should be consistent between your camera and Photoshop. For example, if your camera's coloutspace is set to sRGB, then PS should also be set to sRGB and not something like AdobeRGB etc. I had this problem before where pics would look good on my D70s LCD, but bad (colours washed out, a bit dark) when opened on PS. So check your colourspace for both.

  6. #6

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    Heh, thanks for the quick replies, for my monitor, its now at round 50+% brightness and contrast, anymore and I feel its too bright. For my LCD, its already at lowest brightness setting, but still brighter than my monitor.

    Just realised that even for pictures which are supposed to be a bit underexposed, they still look quite ok on my camera's LCD. This sucks, keep getting conned by the LCD into thinking that the shot is fine. Took a picture of my gf yesterday and it looked fine on the LCD, but on the PC she is almost a silhouette.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gymrat76
    Colourspace should be consistent between your camera and Photoshop. For example, if your camera's coloutspace is set to sRGB, then PS should also be set to sRGB and not something like AdobeRGB etc. I had this problem before where pics would look good on my D70s LCD, but bad (colours washed out, a bit dark) when opened on PS. So check your colourspace for both.
    Eh, anyone have any idea how to check for the colourspace on a Canon S1 IS ?? Thanks for the tip, will go check it out

  8. #8

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    Most of the LCDs in the market have very low colour resolution, that's why you see lots of posterisation artifacts. Contrast is just ok and you can get pretty good ones even in mid-range ones (used to be very lousy). Only a few make the grade, that standard is what you get in the medical fields too. LCDs' main advantage now is resolution (tied loosely with sharpness).

    Seen the Vaio and Mac LCDs? Swee!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by zedwerkz
    Heh, thanks for the quick replies, for my monitor, its now at round 50+% brightness and contrast, anymore and I feel its too bright. For my LCD, its already at lowest brightness setting, but still brighter than my monitor.

    Just realised that even for pictures which are supposed to be a bit underexposed, they still look quite ok on my camera's LCD. This sucks, keep getting conned by the LCD into thinking that the shot is fine. Took a picture of my gf yesterday and it looked fine on the LCD, but on the PC she is almost a silhouette.
    To check for under/over exposure, refer to the histogram if your camera has a built-in one, or to the one in PS. That will give you an indication of the exposure of the picture.

  10. #10

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    Eh I think I found the colourspace for the camera liao, its under the EXIF data (Colour Representation) rite ?

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by zedwerkz
    Dunno if I'm the only guy with this problem around. But when I take a picture, it looks ok on the camera's LCD, bright with good contrast. But when I transfered over to the PC, it looks dark, or underexposed. Tried using Photoshop's auto-levels / auto-contrast but it doesn't makes much of a difference. Why is this the case? I'm using a Canon S1 IS.

    I mean if it looks ok on the LCD, why doesn't it look the same when its on the PC, shouldn't the LCD reflect the exposure setting results correctly. Anyone can help ? I'm quite new to digital photography. Thanks
    for a start, use the adobe gamma to calibrate your monitor. Dun trust the outcome from your LCD. Learn to use the histogram function from your digicam might helps.

  12. #12
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    just to add, both the LCD and even the EVF (electronic viewfinder) does not show the true sharpness of the photo being reviewed. too many times what appears sharp on the LCD/EVF turned out blurred when viewed on a PC monitor. thats the problem with digicams' non-optical viewfinders.

  13. #13
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    gymrat is right, the lcd is not accurate.... i got mislead a few times

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