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Thread: Round The World Trip

  1. #61

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by Edricism View Post
    I had similar thoughts and wonder too, what is the best thing to do in such situations.

    Most of the time, I only travel as a very low-budget backpacker, so I wouldn't have much spare cash to give away to the children anyway. But I do like the idea of "sharing" out pens and colour pencils (probably with notepads) instead, yet not seeming as if I had succumbed to their begging cries.

    Personally, I think sweets are unhealthy for those kids in poverty, who might not have adequate dental hygiene practices etc. Maybe giving them fruits would be a better option?

    I used to do the same those days by dishing out pens and stuff to kids thinking i am doing them good. After my RTW trip and i see the after effects of our "kindness", it makes me have 2nd thoughts.
    For example, when in the highlands of guatemala, there were many cases of missing children (the kids are really adorable and have rosy cheeks) and I was told that with tourists giving out freebies might have open up an opportunity for bad fellows to lure kids away with "presents". unfortunately at that time, many foreigners were view suspiciously and I was very careful about approaching the kids for a chitchat or photo taking..but then again, who can blame them for being wary?

    You are right about not giving sweets as these people living in the countryside or mountains barely have enough money to keep the household going, much less dental treatment. Think we give them additional problems when tooth decay arises.

    Once while travelling in mexico, i met this old american Couple at a popular tourist spot who were taking a rest after a long walk up a monument. As usual, there were tons of souvenir vendors and many have their babies and kids with them. there was a little girl who was just playing there, she wasnt begging nor asking for anything but this old chap whisk out a lollipop from his bag and went chasing behind the little girl to give it to her...WTH? In my heart, i was thinking, if you want to save the world, give some help to them, maybe you should have buy some souvenirs from her mother instead of giving her kid lollipops? who is going to provide her with toothbrush, toothpaste and even dental care?

    I couldnt stop myself and so i voice out to them while trying not to offend them too.
    Of course i got a dirty look from the wife who pull her husband away and muttering under her breath - ha.. must be scolding me la!

    what I did for my recent Myanmar trip was I pre-packed clothes, coloured pencils, pen, books and stuff, got a driver when in Bagan and went searching for a monastry with an on site school/orphanage. i think it is better we donate to the village head, monastry, teachers or parents rather than the kids.
    Last edited by pupuce; 26th October 2010 at 11:10 PM.
    Travel is in my Blood

  2. #62

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by dapier View Post

    Everybody there call me 'Chino' or Chinese. I feel like an animal exhibit haha, where ever I walk in the streets, people will call out Chino Chino. I got used to it.
    In africa, they'll call you toubab, toubab") I got used to it too... although I have jokingly used the african word and call them ' black black"
    Travel is in my Blood

  3. #63

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    what I did for my recent Myanmar trip was I pre-packed clothes, coloured pencils, pen, books and stuff, got a driver when in Bagan and went searching for a monastry with an on site school/orphanage. i think it is better we donate to the village head, monastry, teachers or parents rather than the kids.
    Ugh, so sad to hear about those poor kids being lured by the bad guys! I can only hope that Karma would take care of these evil-mongers appropriately...

    When I went to Myanmar last year, I found all the people there so sweet and charming, especially the impoverished but very wide-eyed children. I couldn't give them anything of use or do anything for them, but I took their photos as best I could.

    A couple of months later, other friends of mine was touring Myanmar, so I printed out those photos of the kids I took and asked my friends to bring along with them, and pass the pics to the kids if they ever chanced upon them. Unfortunately, they couldn't find them, but at least they passed it to some locals there who recognised the children. Hopefully these would be my gifts to them that they will keep in years to come...

  4. #64

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Wow. 13months.

    I am curious. What was the most TERRIBLE thing that happened in those 13 months? The idea of a 13month backpacking trip just looks way to daunting to be done. I would think about people robbing me, stealing my money, falling sick, etc.

    I love travelling or rather "holidaying". I would never think about a trip lasting 13 months. Maybe when I am retired...

  5. #65

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    well... it is abt passion for travelling and photography. Seeing the world in the different view, before travel set your 'goal' and mind set on what you want to achive out of this trip. I guess before u go for a photography do some research on what you want...
    capture the moment of life

  6. #66

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by Edricism View Post
    Ugh, so sad to hear about those poor kids being lured by the bad guys! I can only hope that Karma would take care of these evil-mongers appropriately...

    When I went to Myanmar last year, I found all the people there so sweet and charming, especially the impoverished but very wide-eyed children. I couldn't give them anything of use or do anything for them, but I took their photos as best I could.

    A couple of months later, other friends of mine was touring Myanmar, so I printed out those photos of the kids I took and asked my friends to bring along with them, and pass the pics to the kids if they ever chanced upon them. Unfortunately, they couldn't find them, but at least they passed it to some locals there who recognised the children. Hopefully these would be my gifts to them that they will keep in years to come...
    That is so sweet of you..I do love Myanmar and people are still "innocent" and not mecenary like in nearby developing countries and hae to worry about being rip-off every moment. The prices for most services are still about the same as my 4 year old(old edition) guide book except for government places were rates has gone up.

    Besides sending the pens/colour pencils/books to the monastry/orphange, I understand we can also contribute toothbrush and toothpaste.
    While there, we also gave 5000 Kyat (S$5) to the monks to get some sweets for the kids.. OMG, that scene is imbedded in my mind.. should have seen how their faces light up and crowded around the monk who was opening the packages. He then barked an order and suddenly all the kids were scrambling to another platform, kneeling down and sitting in rows waiting for the distribuion. Old Monk insist that we be the one to distribute the sweets to them, 5 each .. I was sad before but when I saw there smiles, it makes me smile too. I wish I can rbing my nieces and nephews there, to let them learn how the real world is and how fortunate they are.

    I also took photos of the kids and also some betal nut girls- what I did was asked for their address - I intend to print out the pics and send it there. Hopefully they will receive it and make their day!
    Last edited by pupuce; 27th October 2010 at 10:21 AM.
    Travel is in my Blood

  7. #67

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by alantkh View Post
    Wow. 13months.
    I am curious. What was the most TERRIBLE thing that happened in those 13 months? The idea of a 13month backpacking trip just looks way to daunting to be done. I would think about people robbing me, stealing my money, falling sick, etc.
    I love travelling or rather "holidaying". I would never think about a trip lasting 13 months. Maybe when I am retired...

    Hey Alantk,
    Wow 15 months ... hehhe you can say that again!

    To me, it is a dream came true. For many others, it is a dream waiting to be fulfilled
    I want to say this - although it is very rewarding, it is also difficult and daunting. There were good days and there were bad and very bad days. I was mugged in Senegal, pick-pocket in Argentina and losing passport and $, snatch in Chile, I was ill in Jerusalam, I have fallen flat on my face along with my backpack weighing me down in Patagonia which left me with cracked swollen lips and bed ridden for a few days..
    The problem is when you are retired, you might not have the energy for all these adventures any more

    A few occasions, I want to drop it and go home.

    One of this was in Mauritania. First, the journey to get there. It took long 3 days bus journey from Morocco to Mauritania (with very little information on lonely planet except " a few hundred adventurous souls venture down this path" I figured out the last city in Morocco and bused my way there, eventually getting transportation to cross the border - a Mercedez 190 cramped with a total of 7 people took us down the road for 9 hours and finally across the border. In between the 2 countries, the no-man's land was laden with landmines. I thought there is a road, a path or something... but there wasn't - just sand. I did say a prayer at that time and chide myself for taking such a risk and doing this to my family if anything ever happens to me.

    Everything else was fine as I travel around down south to Nauakchott, the capital. In between there were more adventures as I saw ancient cities, cross the desert, fight with the locals to get on the longest ore train in the world which cut across the desert and waking up in the night to find my throat coated with dust..
    IN the capital, here was a coup d'ete and the rebels stormed the palace and hold the president for negotiation. The borders were closed and I couldn't leave. I have a canadian friend who wrote me when he found out I was in Mauritanaia and ask me to contact a local africa guy who lives there.
    He insisted that I move to his home and live with his family. Turned out to be an amazing experience that I'd never forget. After, he brought me to kaedi for a wedding.
    Mind you, Mauritania is hot, dry, dirty, flies that congregate into a patch on the ground which is half the size of my foot and mozzies swarm the air when dusk falls with the risk of malaria. Toilet facilities inadequate and my daily shower/washing of hair/clothes all done in one pail of water. (to be fair, being a guest, they did give me more water but significately lesser than what we are used to)
    I did buy them a few gallons of water as a farewell give and to thank them for their hospitality.
    One night, I was bitten by the mozzies so bad and was scratching till I bled, paranoid of getting malaria, the heat that dispels from the walls of the rooms was saffocating me.. i woke up, scratching.. at that moment I want to scream but I can’t because of the family sleeping nearby.. In my heart, I ask myself "why why? why are you doing this to yourself? You can travel but you dont have to push yourself so hard"
    I cried..tears rolling down my eyes..

    Took me a couple of minutes to calm down before I dragged my thin mattress up the roof and join the guys sleeping up there.. The next day, life goes on

    It was so tough there, maybe that's why even more memorable.
    I realised that most of my best memories are in Africa..I have fallen in love with Africa continent
    There are more stories... Will share them as we continue with this thread
    Last edited by pupuce; 27th October 2010 at 10:58 AM.
    Travel is in my Blood

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    Since we are on the topic of travel here, please share with me your views on travellers who hand out sweets, pens and free gifts to children on the street in the thrid world countries.
    personally, I feel that it isnt right although I know everyone is doing it out of kidness.
    Children being so innocent and vulnerable, it will be instil in them that every foreigner who come their way will be bearing freebies for them, this in turn leads to begging.

    A few times, while trekking or hiking at some popular routes of remote africa or south america and enjoying the simplicity and quietness of the countryside and the people living there. Come along some children, and while I was expecting them to be offering me shy smiles and be full of curiosity about me, they end up stretching out their hands and asking me for bons bons..

    sigh..

    Totally agree with you not to hand out candies to the kids. I was in Semporna and kids ran towards me with arms stretching out shouting 'gula gula', I told them 'gula is not good for your teeth'. Although I guess they didn't understand what I said, they could sense that this guy is not going to hand out any candies...and so they walked away Personally I kind of like taking portraits of kids and I could have just given them candies and asked them to pose for me but I would rather not as dental care is really a premium in such places.

  9. #69

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Interesting stories. I don't think I can survive such conditions nor would I want to...

    I think traveling should be nice and comfortable Relax with family, etc.

    To "adventure" for me. Not to mention dangerous. It really do sound quite dangerous.

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    Hey Alantk,
    Wow 15 months ... hehhe you can say that again!

    To me, it is a dream came true. For many others, it is a dream waiting to be fulfilled
    I want to say this - although it is very rewarding, it is also difficult and daunting. There were good days and there were bad and very bad days. I was mugged in Senegal, pick-pocket in Argentina and losing passport and $, snatch in Chile, I was ill in Jerusalam, I have fallen flat on my face along with my backpack weighing me down in Patagonia which left me with cracked swollen lips and bed ridden for a few days..
    The problem is when you are retired, you might not have the energy for all these adventures any more

    A few occasions, I want to drop it and go home.

    One of this was in Mauritania. First, the journey to get there. It took long 3 days bus journey from Morocco to Mauritania (with very little information on lonely planet except " a few hundred adventurous souls venture down this path" I figured out the last city in Morocco and bused my way there, eventually getting transportation to cross the border - a Mercedez 190 cramped with a total of 7 people took us down the road for 9 hours and finally across the border. In between the 2 countries, the no-man's land was laden with landmines. I thought there is a road, a path or something... but there wasn't - just sand. I did say a prayer at that time and chide myself for taking such a risk and doing this to my family if anything ever happens to me.

    Everything else was fine as I travel around down south to Nauakchott, the capital. In between there were more adventures as I saw ancient cities, cross the desert, fight with the locals to get on the longest ore train in the world which cut across the desert and waking up in the night to find my throat coated with dust..
    IN the capital, here was a coup d'ete and the rebels stormed the palace and hold the president for negotiation. The borders were closed and I couldn't leave. I have a canadian friend who wrote me when he found out I was in Mauritanaia and ask me to contact a local africa guy who lives there.
    He insisted that I move to his home and live with his family. Turned out to be an amazing experience that I'd never forget. After, he brought me to kaedi for a wedding.
    Mind you, Mauritania is hot, dry, dirty, flies that congregate into a patch on the ground which is half the size of my foot and mozzies swarm the air when dusk falls with the risk of malaria. Toilet facilities inadequate and my daily shower/washing of hair/clothes all done in one pail of water. (to be fair, being a guest, they did give me more water but significately lesser than what we are used to)
    I did buy them a few gallons of water as a farewell give and to thank them for their hospitality.
    One night, I was bitten by the mozzies so bad and was scratching till I bled, paranoid of getting malaria, the heat that dispels from the walls of the rooms was saffocating me.. i woke up, scratching.. at that moment I want to scream but I can’t because of the family sleeping nearby.. In my heart, I ask myself "why why? why are you doing this to yourself? You can travel but you dont have to push yourself so hard"
    I cried..tears rolling down my eyes..

    Took me a couple of minutes to calm down before I dragged my thin mattress up the roof and join the guys sleeping up there.. The next day, life goes on

    It was so tough there, maybe that's why even more memorable.
    I realised that most of my best memories are in Africa..I have fallen in love with Africa continent
    There are more stories... Will share them as we continue with this thread

  10. #70

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    Hey Alantk,
    Wow 15 months ... hehhe you can say that again!

    To me, it is a dream came true. For many others, it is a dream waiting to be fulfilled
    I want to say this - although it is very rewarding, it is also difficult and daunting. There were good days and there were bad and very bad days. I was mugged in Senegal, pick-pocket in Argentina and losing passport and $, snatch in Chile, I was ill in Jerusalam, I have fallen flat on my face along with my backpack weighing me down in Patagonia which left me with cracked swollen lips and bed ridden for a few days..
    The problem is when you are retired, you might not have the energy for all these adventures any more

    A few occasions, I want to drop it and go home.

    One of this was in Mauritania. First, the journey to get there. It took long 3 days bus journey from Morocco to Mauritania (with very little information on lonely planet except " a few hundred adventurous souls venture down this path" I figured out the last city in Morocco and bused my way there, eventually getting transportation to cross the border - a Mercedez 190 cramped with a total of 7 people took us down the road for 9 hours and finally across the border. In between the 2 countries, the no-man's land was laden with landmines. I thought there is a road, a path or something... but there wasn't - just sand. I did say a prayer at that time and chide myself for taking such a risk and doing this to my family if anything ever happens to me.

    Everything else was fine as I travel around down south to Nauakchott, the capital. In between there were more adventures as I saw ancient cities, cross the desert, fight with the locals to get on the longest ore train in the world which cut across the desert and waking up in the night to find my throat coated with dust..
    IN the capital, here was a coup d'ete and the rebels stormed the palace and hold the president for negotiation. The borders were closed and I couldn't leave. I have a canadian friend who wrote me when he found out I was in Mauritanaia and ask me to contact a local africa guy who lives there.
    He insisted that I move to his home and live with his family. Turned out to be an amazing experience that I'd never forget. After, he brought me to kaedi for a wedding.
    Mind you, Mauritania is hot, dry, dirty, flies that congregate into a patch on the ground which is half the size of my foot and mozzies swarm the air when dusk falls with the risk of malaria. Toilet facilities inadequate and my daily shower/washing of hair/clothes all done in one pail of water. (to be fair, being a guest, they did give me more water but significately lesser than what we are used to)
    I did buy them a few gallons of water as a farewell give and to thank them for their hospitality.
    One night, I was bitten by the mozzies so bad and was scratching till I bled, paranoid of getting malaria, the heat that dispels from the walls of the rooms was saffocating me.. i woke up, scratching.. at that moment I want to scream but I can’t because of the family sleeping nearby.. In my heart, I ask myself "why why? why are you doing this to yourself? You can travel but you dont have to push yourself so hard"
    I cried..tears rolling down my eyes..

    Took me a couple of minutes to calm down before I dragged my thin mattress up the roof and join the guys sleeping up there.. The next day, life goes on

    It was so tough there, maybe that's why even more memorable.
    I realised that most of my best memories are in Africa..I have fallen in love with Africa continent
    There are more stories... Will share them as we continue with this thread
    wow.. i m sure u hv lots of stories.. maybe can publish a book already.. with all the photos..

  11. #71

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by alantkh View Post
    Interesting stories. I don't think I can survive such conditions nor would I want to...

    I think traveling should be nice and comfortable .Relax with family, etc.
    To "adventure" for me. Not to mention dangerous. It really do sound quite dangerous.
    Holidays definitely should be nice and comfortable and i enjoy them too. I guess the reason for me to embark on this trip was different and so it helps push me further.
    I wanted a journey that truly let me learnt about other people's life, I wanted to see the other world we are vaguely aware of but have no inkling what it really takes to live it.
    I am proud of myself for surviving it and at the same time i discover not only about the world but also about myself.

    it is dangerous in 3rd world country and developed cities - its the real world. But you are right, there are some situations that could have been avoided - like the landmines
    Unfortunately, I thrive on adrenalin
    Last edited by pupuce; 4th November 2010 at 11:06 AM.
    Travel is in my Blood

  12. #72

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Something I want to touch on about the travelling, be it for a short trip or a 15 months round the world trip..

    Travelling Solo..

    I think loneliness is one of the biggest fears for many first time 'travel alones". Like myself at the begining, I was trying hard to meet some traveller online and travel together. None of them materialised.

    Travelling alone can be an enriching experience but it is also exhausting, bothersome, dangerous , lonely, homesick and a million other emotions.

    But i have come to learn that travelling alone, and not part of a group or a couple has it plus points - you'll get to meet a lot more people than the group or the couple!!(who are probably quite envious of your freedom and opportunities) all we need to do is, go to the hostel courtyard, kitchen with a big smile, say hello and get the conversation rolling.

    another good thing about being alone is I have the freedom to adapt and change my plans should a better plan crops up. i can be flexible without offending a long term travelling companion or friend. it has happened to me on a few occasions when I was whisked off to another country even though I have just arrived in the afternoon at the first country.

    Getting from one place to another can be particularly daunting when I was doing it on my own: no one to share decisions with, no one you can rely on to share the burden should things get a little bumpy but despite cultural and linguistic differences people throughout the world aren't all that dissimilar when it comes to wanting to help out. In fact they're even more likely to offer you assistance if you're clearly alone.

    When it comes to eating, this very much depends on the country I am in. Backpacking with a budget means I'll be cooking in the often overcrowded yet sociable hostel or camp kitchen and not having to face the sometimes scary prospect of sitting down at a food stall (with a book!) even then when i do eat out, it is often that I bump into people and we end up eating our meals together. In the event i dont meet any familiar faces, I'll just order my food, be kay poh and look at what everyone is eating, check out the surroundings and very often the waiter/waitress will make coversation. sharing tables is also another great way to meet locals and I have so far always get very positive outcomes from this.

    It's important to realise however, that no one's alone when it comes to feeling lonely! Those moments when you are having a bad time, feeling homesick, nervous or as if you've not had a normal conversation with anyone in 24 hours, are simply part of travelling and shared by seasoned backpackers, individuals and groups alike. And let's be honest, even when you're back at home, it's usual to have good and bad days.
    Undoubtedly, travelling on your own exposes you to all sorts of new situations that in many cases you've never had to encounter in the ‘safe' environment of home yet the sense of achievement you feel when you realise that you can go it alone is no less exhilarating than the day you manage to stand up on that surfboard.

    Not everyone takes to travelling alone.. The main thing is to take the plunge and at least give it a go. After all, it might just turn out to be the ride of your life and before you know it, you, like 1000s of others, are totally hooked!
    Last edited by pupuce; 4th November 2010 at 11:03 AM.
    Travel is in my Blood

  13. #73

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    Something I want to touch on about the travelling, be it for a short trip or a 15 months round the world trip..

    Travelling Solo..

    I think loneliness is one of the biggest fears for many first time 'travel alones". Like myself at the begining, I was trying hard to meet some traveller online and travel together. None of it materialised.

    Travelling alone can be an enriching experience but it is also exhausting, bothersome, dangerous , lonely, homesick and a million other emotions.

    But i have come to learn that travelling alone, and not part of a group or a couple has it plus points - you'll get to meet a lot more people than the group or the couple!!(who are probably quite envious of your freedom and opportunities) all we need to do is, go to the hostel courtyard, kitchen with a big smile, say hello and get the conversation rolling.

    another good thing about being alone is I have the freedom to adapt and change my plans should a better plan crops up. i can be flexible without offending a long term travelling companion or friend. it has happened to me on a few occasions when I was whisked off to another country even though I have just arrived in the afternoon at the first country.

    Getting from one place to another can be particularly daunting when I was doing it on my own: no one to share decisions with, no one you can rely on to share the burden should things get a little bumpy but despite cultural and linguistic differences people throughout the world aren't all that dissimilar when it comes to wanting to help out. In fact they're even more likely to offer you assistance if you're clearly alone.

    When it comes to eating, this very much depends on the country I am in. Backpacking with a budget means I'll be cooking in the often overcrowded yet sociable hostel or camp kitchen and not having to face the sometimes scary prospect of sitting down at a food stall (with a book!) even then when i do eat out, it is often that I bump into people and we end up eating our meals together. In the event i dont meet any familiar faces, I'll just order my food, be kay poh and look at what everyone is eating, check out the surroundings and very often the waiter/waitress will make coversation. sharing tables is also another great way to meet locals and I have so far always get very positive outcomes from this.

    It's important to realise however, that no one's alone when it comes to feeling lonely! Those moments when you are having a bad time, feeling homesick, nervous or as if you've not had a normal conversation with anyone in 24 hours, are simply part of travelling and shared by seasoned backpackers, individuals and groups alike. And let's be honest, even when you're back at home, it's usual to have good and bad days.
    Undoubtedly, travelling on your own exposes you to all sorts of new situations that in many cases you've never had to encounter in the ‘safe' environment of home yet the sense of achievement you feel when you realise that you can go it alone is no less exhilarating than the day you manage to stand up on that surfboard.

    Not everyone takes to travelling alone.. The main thing is to take the plunge and at least give it a go. After all, it might just turn out to be the ride of your life and before you know it, you, like 1000s of others, are totally hooked!
    nice write up.. got to agree wif u

  14. #74

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by pupuce View Post
    It is very hard for me to find anyone to share this joy and satisfaction after completing the trip becasue I have yet to find someone who has done it.
    On top of that, I hope to find someone who truly understands why I decided to travel the hard way - I use mode of transportations like the locals, slept the same way as them if I have the opportunity and eat the same as they did.
    I believe from the bottom of my heart - " it is not just the destination but the journey that is to be savoured"

    I would be glad to offer any advice or presentation to anyone who is keen to trade stories... I love talking travel.. hahah

    Cheers
    I share your thoughts!! I understand why you travelled the hard way, and also why you decided to go for it alone. I recalled my solo trips and my decision to go solo.

    Originally I had a few companions, total 5 of us, on the first trip...but then I realised that they sort of took me like a free tour guide, maybe because I know the way better, the transportation system, and also because I was the only one to do all the planning! They did not care about where they wanted to go and what they wanted to see, so most of the burden and stress was on me to get everything going smoothly... At the end of the trip, I told myself that that will be the last time I'm going on a trip in a group. So that was the start of my solo trips.

    Similar to your experiences, albeit on a much smaller scale, I was exhilarated and excited at the same time to find that travelling alone can be so enjoyable! The freedom of time and space, not having to accommodate to other people's schedules and plans, it was just plain enjoyable. And being alone forces you to really blend yourself into the culture of that place, and forces you to mingle and interact with the locals. I think that's the essence of travelling alone
    And I agree with the part of "it is not just the destination but the journey that is to be savoured"

  15. #75
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    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    jus gotta salute u
    Stirring up emotions with pics - cyliew

  16. #76
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    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    U r the woMAN. Hahaha... Similarly, 4 years ago, I met a korean during my backpacking trip in China. This guy quit his job and began his tour of China and Asia for a year with just a backpack. Not knowing the chinese language, he simply relied on maps and pointing to get to his destinations. We became good frens and keep in contact since then. My cousin, saved enough after working a few years to quit her job, and tour europe for half a year.

    It takes a great amount of courage, especially for a Singaporean to put down his work and stuff and see the world but you done it. Everyone has a different passion or hobbies and viewpoints on how to spend the money. Some spend them on luxury items, some spend on their family etc. Others can say, "oh my, u quit ur job tour the world. u so rich, must be spoilt. I wont do such things etc" but u are what u are and what u did u know best. I am just one of those who save to travel and love to see the world and i admire u and my korean friend who can even take the effort to take the extra step out to make the difference. Share your stories, for they shall well be remembered for years to come.

  17. #77

    Default Re: Round The World Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by kuantoh View Post
    U r the woMAN. Hahaha... Similarly, 4 years ago, I met a korean during my backpacking trip in China. This guy quit his job and began his tour of China and Asia for a year with just a backpack. Not knowing the chinese language, he simply relied on maps and pointing to get to his destinations. We became good frens and keep in contact since then. My cousin, saved enough after working a few years to quit her job, and tour europe for half a year.

    It takes a great amount of courage, especially for a Singaporean to put down his work and stuff and see the world but you done it. Everyone has a different passion or hobbies and viewpoints on how to spend the money. Some spend them on luxury items, some spend on their family etc. Others can say, "oh my, u quit ur job tour the world. u so rich, must be spoilt. I wont do such things etc" but u are what u are and what u did u know best. I am just one of those who save to travel and love to see the world and i admire u and my korean friend who can even take the effort to take the extra step out to make the difference. Share your stories, for they shall well be remembered for years to come.

    Hello Kuantoh, thanks for sharing with us. Actually travelling around the world is really common fo the gap-year students and even some grown-ups but I think many are impressed because they are so few singaporeans doing it. I really hope that this would inspire many to live their dream (if this is what they want) rather than think about it..

    It is difficult to make that decision and harder even when on the road but one gain many insights not only to the world but also about themselves.

    I am sharing some pictures in the Photos/landscapes/my round the world trip.
    Do drop in there and offere me some critical assessments of the photos if you can.
    Travel is in my Blood

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