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Thread: Digital ISO vs Film ISO

  1. #1

    Default Digital ISO vs Film ISO

    I have a couple of questions regarding ISO in digital and ISO in film:

    1) Is the ISO in digital different than film in terms of light handling ability? E.g. for a given low-light situation, and assuming that Av and Tv are fixed, will the ISO setting in digital be the same as film.

    2) How about the grain structure? How are "digital grains" diff from those u get in various high-speed films?

    3) For B + W photography, which would be a better choice? Digital or film?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Hedge
    I have a couple of questions regarding ISO in digital and ISO in film:

    1) Is the ISO in digital different than film in terms of light handling ability? E.g. for a given low-light situation, and assuming that Av and Tv are fixed, will the ISO setting in digital be the same as film.

    2) How about the grain structure? How are "digital grains" diff from those u get in various high-speed films?

    3) For B + W photography, which would be a better choice? Digital or film?
    1) yes. it's standardised, theorically
    2) for digital sensors, it's noise. the higher the iso, the higher the noise level
    3) film.

  3. #3

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    Thanks mervlam.

    Which film will you recommmend for B + W photography?

  4. #4
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    Kodak Tri-X, Tmax, or Ilford HP5... but these will all require darkroom developing, or a lab that has a darkroom setup. Kodak TCN, however, is a film that all labs can process for you as it's basically a color negative in gray tones.

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    Second tingchiyen's suggestion, but do note that Tri-X and HP-5 are 400 speed film and have a bit of grain. The grain is great in my opinion, but should you prefer a smoother look, try the slower B&W films.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Hedge
    2) How about the grain structure? How are "digital grains" diff from those u get in various high-speed films?
    Film grain is monochromatic and is less objectionable than the coloured noise that occurs in high iso digital images.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tingchiyen
    Kodak Tri-X, Tmax, or Ilford HP5... but these will all require darkroom developing, or a lab that has a darkroom setup. Kodak TCN, however, is a film that all labs can process for you as it's basically a color negative in gray tones.
    How much do these typically cost(as in per roll)? And where can I get them?

  8. #8

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    You can get them from Ruby Photo or Cathay Photo.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Hedge
    How much do these typically cost(as in per roll)? And where can I get them?
    I think TMax 100 is $6.50 per roll, last i bought... + or - 50 cents for the rest... it's all about there.
    Processing and developing will be more expensive than standard film because you need a darkroom.

  10. #10

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    Get the Kodak T400CN...costs around $5-6 and costs the same as colour negs for processing. From my limited experience, TCN is a good film for those starting out in B&W because of the lower captial costs. Once you are serious about getting into B&W photography, it would be cheaper in the long run if you have your own darkroom and use TMax films.

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