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Thread: how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

  1. #1

    Question how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

    scenario......

    i want to take a pic of the sky , however 1 side (where the sun is shining) is alot brighter than the other side...

    however when the pic came out , the darker side is totally underexposed ,but the brighter side is just nicely exposed , how do i take it so that both sides are exposed correctly?
    up the +EV compensation?

    another question , what is average metering?

    normally i shld use centre-weighted right?
    my cam allows average , centre-weighted and spot.


  2. #2
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    Default Re: how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

    Originally posted by superhero
    scenario......

    i want to take a pic of the sky , however 1 side (where the sun is shining) is alot brighter than the other side...

    however when the pic came out , the darker side is totally underexposed ,but the brighter side is just nicely exposed , how do i take it so that both sides are exposed correctly?
    up the +EV compensation?

    another question , what is average metering?

    normally i shld use centre-weighted right?
    my cam allows average , centre-weighted and spot.

    You have run into a very common problem - the camera (or in case of film users, the film) is unable to accomodate the very wide brightness range of whatever you're trying to shoot. That is, the differences between the bright and dark parts are just too big, and the camera/film can only record a certain range.

    If you make the sky correctly exposed, the shadow areas will be severly underexposed. Likewise, if you make the shadow areas correctly exposed, the sky would be overexposed.

    There is no easy solution for this, you just have to decide which part is more important to you, or wait for another day, or use fill flash. The other method is to mount the camera on a tripod and take 2 shots - 1 with the sky correctly exposed, 1 with the shadow areas correctly exposed and combine them in photoshop.

    Average metering takes the whole scene into account and averages out the exposure. This is usually done by metering several sections of the scene.

    Centre Weighted metering places an emphasis (weighting) on the centre portion where the subject usually is.

    Spot metering measures a very small area, typically about 1-3 of coverage.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3
    ClubSNAP Idol Adam Goi's Avatar
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    Default Re: how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

    Originally posted by superhero
    scenario......

    i want to take a pic of the sky , however 1 side (where the sun is shining) is alot brighter than the other side...

    however when the pic came out , the darker side is totally underexposed ,but the brighter side is just nicely exposed , how do i take it so that both sides are exposed correctly?
    up the +EV compensation?

    another question , what is average metering?

    normally i shld use centre-weighted right?
    my cam allows average , centre-weighted and spot.

    If I'm not wrong, your metering was deceived by the bright sun and such...perhaps you can try metering off a grey card or somewhere which is not too bright...

  4. #4

    Default Re: Re: how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

    Originally posted by ckiang


    You have run into a very common problem - the camera (or in case of film users, the film) is unable to accomodate the very wide brightness range of whatever you're trying to shoot. That is, the differences between the bright and dark parts are just too big, and the camera/film can only record a certain range.

    If you make the sky correctly exposed, the shadow areas will be severly underexposed. Likewise, if you make the shadow areas correctly exposed, the sky would be overexposed.

    There is no easy solution for this, you just have to decide which part is more important to you, or wait for another day, or use fill flash. The other method is to mount the camera on a tripod and take 2 shots - 1 with the sky correctly exposed, 1 with the shadow areas correctly exposed and combine them in photoshop.

    Average metering takes the whole scene into account and averages out the exposure. This is usually done by metering several sections of the scene.

    Centre Weighted metering places an emphasis (weighting) on the centre portion where the subject usually is.

    Spot metering measures a very small area, typically about 1-3?of coverage.

    Regards
    CK
    i see....

    thanks for the informative advices.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Re: how come like this huh? 2 questions.....

    Originally posted by AdamGoi


    If I'm not wrong, your metering was deceived by the bright sun and such...perhaps you can try metering off a grey card or somewhere which is not too bright...
    how do i actually try metering off the grey card???



    hold the card infront of the lens during focusing??

  6. #6
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    Default

    gradual filters...............

  7. #7
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    Default

    Originally posted by Fundee
    gradual filters...............
    what if the horizon is uneven? (e.g. mountains, buildings, etc)

    Regards
    CK

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