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Thread: Tips on France + Paris

  1. #21

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by petetherock View Post
    Well then, the lightest and easiest to handle trolley type bag that has wheels then!

    There are plenty of ups and downs in Europe and the distance between the train stations and your destinations are not always near.
    jus as i thought. sigh dilemma to carry all their stuffs on my back but that'll make me stand out just as much as a backpacker, probably making me more probabe for crimes.

    any tips around in Strasboug or any towns in Rhone Valley? thinking between the two which to visit for 3days, 2nights.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Be careful of pickpocketer. It is quite rampant there. I was there two weeks ago and the first place I visited was the local police station. Got pick pocket at Gare du Nord metro after coming in from London by Euro Star (Rail). It was my first visit to Paris. Please google about pick pocket in Paris.

    CP

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Hi,

    I am going Paris in jun. Currently trying to find accommodation for a family of three.

    Anyone has any recommendation? There's lots of apart and bed and breakfast out there, but I read there are lots of fake scam out there.

    If you had personal experienced accommodation in Paris, please share with me.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Great info there bro

  5. #25

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    The heart of the Left Bank (the south side of the river Seine) is the Latin Quarter. To the west, St-Germain is a mixture of bohemian cafés and stylish shops.

    Continuing downstream, the Seine curls around to the elegant buildings of the 7th arrondissement, which come to a halt in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower.
    See
    The Musée d’Orsay displays France’s national collection of paintings, sculptures and objets d’art from the 1840s to 1914, including Impressionist works by Monet, Degas and Cézanne (00 33 1 40 49 48 14; musee-orsay.fr; 62 rue de Lille, 7e; 9.30am-6pm daily, closed Mon; £7).
    In fine weather Parisians flock to the terraces and chestnut groves of the 23-hectare Jardin du Luxembourg. In the southern part of the garden, you’ll find urban orchards and the beekeeping school Rucher du Luxembourg (8am-5pm, 10pm in summer).
    Famous for its appearance in The Da Vinci Code, the elegant Italianate church Église St-Sulpice was built between 1646 and 1780. The beautiful frescos in the Chapelle des Sts-Anges were painted by artist Eugène Delacroix (place St-Sulpice, 6e; 7.30am-7.30pm; free).
    The Institute of the Arab World is in a building that successfully mixes modern and traditional Arab and Western elements. The institute’s collection focuses on painting a global vision of the Arab world (00 33 1 40 51 38 38; imarabe.org; 1 place Mohammed V, 5e; 10am-6pm Tue-Sun; £6).
    The Musée National Eugène Delacroix was the artist’s home and studio when he died in 1863, and contains many of his more intimate works (00 33 1 44 41 86 50; musee-delacroix.fr; 6 rue de Furstenberg, 6e; 9.30am-5pm daily, closed Tue; £4).
    Eat and drink
    The king of Parisian fromageries, Quatrehomme offers an original take on classics, including Roquefort bread and Mont d’Or flavoured with black truffles and spiced honey (00 33 1 47 34 33 45; 62 rue de Sèvres, 6e).
    For a unique Left Bank experience, dig into a couscous or tagine at La Mosquée de Paris within the walls of the city’s central mosque. Or spoil yourself with a peppermint tea and an oriental pastry in its tearoom (00 33 1 43 31 38 20; 39 rue Geoffroy St-Hilaire, 5e; lunch and dinner; mains £12-£20).
    The hybrid Bistro Les Papilles is part wine cellar, part delicatessen. Dine at simply dressed tables on market-driven fare. Each weekday, the chef prepares a different marmite du marché (market hot pot). The wine list is exceptional (00 33 1 43 25 20 79; lespapillesparis. com; 30 rue Gay Lussac, 5e; lunch and dinner Tue-Sat; 2-/4-course menu £18/£26).
    Lunch at L’Agrume and watch chefs work in the open kitchen on dishes such as sea bream tartare with spider crab. Evening dining is a five-course tasting menu (00 33 1 43 31 86 48; 15 rue des Fossés St-Marcel, 5e; lunch and dinner Tue-Sun; mains £25, tasting menu £30).
    Le Comptoir du Relais serves seasonal dishes such as breaded pig’s trotter and foie gras salad. Arrive at 12.30pm to bag lunch without a reservation (00 33 1 44 27 07 97; 9 Carrefour de l’Odéon, 6e; lunch and dinner; dinner menu £42).
    Sleep
    The Port Royal Hôtel has been owned by the same family since 1931, and is an unassuming budget option. The simple rooms, furnished with wrought-iron beds and bright yellow bedding, are very quiet. The cheaper ones share a bathroom. Credit cards are not accepted (00 33 1 43 31 70 06; hotelportroyal.fr; 8 bd de Port Royal, 5e; from £45).
    You’ll need to book in advance to stay at the Hôtel du Champde- Mars. Situated near the rue Cler market, this townhouse has 25 cosy rooms decorated in French country style with printed wallpapers and painted furniture (00 33 1 45 51 52 30; hoteldu champdemars.com; 7 rue du Champ de Mars, 7e; from £85).
    Occupying two Haussman buildings, the Hôtel Minerve has a reception area kitted out in oriental carpets and antique books. Rooms are styled with mahogany furniture and toile de Jouy fabrics and while some rooms have balconies, two have tiny courtyards (00 33 1 43 26 26 04; parishotelminerve.com; 13 rue des Écoles, 5e; from £105).
    As much a work of art, with its stencilled façade by French artist Catherine Feff, as a design hotel, Apostrophe has 16 themed rooms, paying homage to the written word. Graffiti tags over one wall of room U, for ‘urbain’, which has a ceiling shaped like a skateboard ramp (00 33 1 56 54 31 31; apostrophe-hotel.com; 3 rue de Chevreuse, 6e; from £135).


    Hôtel la Demeure is the domain of a charming father and son team who provide appealing extras: an iPod dock in every room, wine glasses for guests who bring their own, and art to buy on the walls (00 33 1 43 37 81 25; hotellademeureparis.com; 51 bd St-Marcel, 13e; from £145).
    Getting around
    The Metro is the easiest way to get around and runs from 5am to 12.30am (single fare £1.50; ratp.fr). Day and multi-day tourist passes are available at larger stations. The Vélib bike scheme gives you access to 1,500 bike stations across Paris (velib.paris.fr).
    Getting there
    There are easyJet flights from London Luton (from £60) and Edinburgh (from £100; easyjet.com) to Charles de Gaulle airport. Eurostar trains run from St Pancras International to Gare du Nord (from £69; eurostar.com).
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  6. #26

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    http://www.elysee-etoile-paris-hotel.com/

    Hotel Features1 minute from Champs Elysees
    A 10 minute walk from the Porte Maillot.
    Free WIFI

    Hôtel Elysée Etoile5, rue de l'Etoile
    75017 Paris - France
    Tel : +33 (0)1 43 80 22 19
    Fax : +33 (0)1 44 40 09 89
    elysee.etoile@wanadoo.fr

    Elysee Etoile Hotel is situated in the heart of Paris. The hotel is exceptionally well placed for tourists, a stone's throw from the Champs Elysees and the Arc de Triomphe. You will be within easy reach of many places of interest within Paris, (the Palais des Congres at Porte Maillot, the prestigious Haute Couture shop windows in the Triangle d'Or district, the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, etc) which you may visit, using the many direct transport possibilities.

    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  7. #27

    Default Paris in a Day....

    In One Day

    Because time is wasting, arise early and begin your day with some live "theater" by walking the streets around your hotel -- Right Bank or Left Bank, it doesn't matter at this point. This walk can acclimate you to the sights, sounds, and smells of the City of Light faster than anything, and it gets you centered before catching a taxi or hopping aboard the Métro for a ride underground to your first attraction.

    We suggest you duck into a cafe for breakfast, and it doesn't matter where. On virtually every street in Paris, there is usually more than one cafe.

    Any neighborhood will provide a slice of Parisian life, so order breakfast as thousands of locals do. Sit back, enjoy, and breathe deeply before beginning your descent on Paris. Start: Métro to Palais Royal-Musée du Louvre.

    1. Musée du Louvre

    You know you must see the Louvre, perhaps the greatest museum of art in the world. You wouldn't dare go home without storming that citadel. Because it opens at 9am, be among the first in line.

    We've been going to this repository of art for years and, on every visit, discover something we've overlooked before. This palatial treasure trove is richly endowed, and some of its art is the most acclaimed on earth. With your clock ticking, at least call on the "great ladies of the Louvre": the Mona Lisa with her enigmatic smile, the sexy Venus de Milo, and Winged Victory (alas, without a head). Try to allot at least 2 hours of viewing time for some world-class masterpieces. Around 11am, go for a walk along:

    2. The Quays of the Seine

    After leaving the Louvre, walk south toward the river and head east for a stroll along the Seine. You'll encounter the most splendid panoramic vistas that Paris has to offer. Trees shade the banks of the river, and 14 bridges span the Seine. So much of the city's fortune has depended on this river, and you'll be in the nerve center of Paris life as you stroll along.

    You'll see Paris's greatest island on the Seine, the Cité, emerging before you. Cross over the:

    3. Pont Neuf

    The oldest and most evocative of the bridges of Paris, Pont Neuf dates from 1578 and still looks the same. From the bridge, the view down (or up) the river is perhaps the most memorable in Paris. Walk down the steps emerging on your right along Pont Neuf to:

    4. Square du Vert Galant

    The steps take you behind the statue dedicated to Henri IV to the square du Vert Galant at the western tip of Ile de la Cité. The square takes its designation from the nickname given Henri IV, meaning "gay old spark." The square is the best vantage point for viewing Pont Neuf and the Louvre. As you stand on this square, you'll be at the "prow" of Cité if you liken the island to a giant ship. After taking in that view, continue east, pausing at:

    5. Place Dauphine

    This square -- perfect for a picnic -- was named in honor of the Dauphin, the future Louis XIII. It faces the towering mass of La Conciergerie, whose gloomy precincts and memories of the French Revolution you can save for another visit to Paris. With time moving on, head east along:

    6. Quai des Orfèvres

    This Seine-bordering quay leads east to Notre-Dame. It was the former market of the jewelers of 17th- and 18th-century Paris. Marie Antoinette's celebrated necklace, subject of countless legends, was fashioned here. The quay leads you to:

    7. Sainte-Chapelle

    This Gothic chapel is sublime, and entering its upper chapel is like climbing into Tiffany's most deluxe jewel box. As the colored light from the 13th-century windows shines through, you'll bathe in perhaps the most brilliantly colored "walls of glass" in the world. Taking in the deep glow of these astonishing windows is one of the great joys of a visit to the City of Light. The windows, the oldest in Paris, are known not only for their brilliant colors, but also for the vitality of their characters, including everybody from Adam and Eve to St. John the Baptist and the Virgin.

    After a visit, it's time for lunch. Because first-day visitors have little time to absorb Left Bank life, here's your chance.

    Continue east along quai des Orfèvres until you come to the Pont St-Michel. Cross the bridge to the Left Bank of Paris, arriving at the Latin Quarter centering on:

    8. Place St-Michel

    One of the inner chambers of Left Bank life, this square was named in memory of the ancient chapel of St-Michel that stood here once upon a time. The square, a bustling hub of Sorbonne life, centers on a fountain from 1860 designed by Gabriel Davioud, rising 23m (75 ft.) high and stretching out to 5m (15 ft.), a "monster" spouting water. A bronze statue depicts Saint Michael fighting the dragon.

    Why not do lunch in one of the most evocative of all Left Bank bistros?

    Allard -- Arm yourself with a good map to reach Allard, which is only a 5-minute walk southwest of place St-Michel. You can easily get lost in the narrow maze of Left Bank streets. Little has changed at this classic bistro with its mellow decor and traditional menu. Against a nostalgic ambience of Paris of the 1930s, you can join cosmopolitan patrons enjoying the sole meunière or canard d'olives, finishing off with that most divine pastry known to all Parisians as tarte tatin. And, yes, if you've never tried them before, you'll find frogs' legs on the menu. 41 rue St-André-des-Arts, 6e. tel. 01-43-26-48-23.

    After lunch, walk back to place St-Michel.

    Still on the Left Bank, continue east along quai St-Michel until it becomes quai de Montebello. At the "green lung" or park, square Rene Viviani, pause to take in the most dramatic view of Notre-Dame across the Seine. Then cross the bridge, Pont au Double, to visit the cathedral itself.

    9. Cathédrale de Notre-Dame

    In so many ways, the exterior is more exciting than the vast and hollow interior that, since its denuding during the French Revolution, is almost tomblike. One of the supreme masterpieces of Gothic art, Notre-Dame cathedral still evokes Victor Hugo's novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. You stand in awe, taking in the majestic and perfectly balanced portals. After a walk through the somber interior, climb the towers (around to the left facing the building) for a close encounter with tons of bells and an eerie inspection of what are history's most bizarre gargoyles, some so terribly impish that they seem to be mocking you.

    After Notre-Dame, take the Métro to the:

    10. Place de la Concorde

    This octagonal traffic hub, built in 1757, is dominated by an Egyptian obelisk from Luxor, the oldest manmade object in Paris, from 1300 B.C. In the Reign of Terror at the time of the French Revolution, the dreaded guillotine was erected on this spot to claim thousands of heads. For a spectacular view, look down the Champs-Elysées.

    The grandest walk in Paris begins here, leading all the way to the Arc de Triomphe. It's a distance of 3.2km (2 miles) and is the most popular walk in Paris.

    However, because your afternoon is short, you may want to skip most of it, taking the Métro to Franklin D. Roosevelt and continuing west from there. At least you'll see the busiest and most commercial part of the:

    11. Champs-Elysées

    Called "the highway of French grandeur," this boulevard was designed for promenading. It's witnessed some of the greatest moments in French history and some of its worst defeats, such as when Hitler's armies paraded down the street in 1940. Louis XIV ordered the construction of the 1.8km (1 mile) avenue in 1667. Without worrying about any particular monument, stroll along its avenue of sidewalk cafes, automobile showrooms, airline offices, cinemas, lingerie stores, and even hamburger joints. The Champs has obviously lost its fin-de-siècle elegance as evoked by Marcel Proust in Remembrance of Things Past. But then, what hasn't?

    At the end of the broad boulevard, you approach:

    12. Arc de Triomphe

    The greatest triumphal arch in the world, the 49m (161 ft.) arch can be climbed for one of the most panoramic views of Paris. The arch marks the intersections of the 8th, 16th, and 17th arrondissements. Sculptures, including François Rude's famous La Marseillaise, depicting the uprising of 1792, are embedded in the arch.

    After a visit, and with the afternoon fading, take the Métro to the Champ de Mars-Tour Eiffel for an ascent up the:

    13. Tour Eiffel

    It's open until 11pm or midnight, so don't worry about missing it. A close encounter with this tower, a 10,000-ton dark metal structure is more inspiring up close than when seen from afar. A source of wonder since the 1889 World Exposition, this 317m (1,040 ft.) tower was the world's tallest building until the Chrysler Building went up in New York in 1930. If the afternoon is clear, you can see for 65km (40 miles).

    Read more: http://www.frommers.com/destinations...#ixzz1N42swXAD
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  8. #28

    Default Re: Paris in a Day....

    OR

    10.56am

    As your train pulls into Gare du Nord, take a second to breathe in the tobacco and butter-scented air and contemplate the blissful day ahead. Bienvenue à Paris.

    Hop on the Métro (the queue for tickets at the station is always obscene; a one-day unlimited pass, called a Carte Mobilis, costs €6) and head to the most delightful fuelling bay on the planet, the Café Beaubourg (43 rue St-Merri, +33 (0)1 48 87 63 96).

    Looking out over the Centre Pompidou's newly clean entrails, order croissants and their special hot chocolate, which tastes like melted-down squares of black chocolate mixed with cream - mainly because it is. Take a minute to mock the pseudo-intellectuals discussing the death of French cinema on either side of you: that's what they're there for.

    11.45am

    Cross the rue Rambuteau and head towards the Musée Picasso (5 rue de Thorigny, +33 (0)1 42 71 25 21, www.musee-picasso.fr) which contains more than 3,000 different works of art. Alongside his own drawings, there are many pieces of his personal collection on display, by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Rousseau, Seurat, de Chirico and Matisse. A quick shot of culture is enough - spend too long in any museum and it becomes more of a chore than a pleasure.

    12.15pm

    Make your way towards the Latin Quarter, stopping for an espresso at Le Zimmer (1 Place du Châtelet, +33 (0)1 42 36 74 03), a theatrical brasserie where printed notices on the walls urge you, in the words of Alfred de Musset to George Sand, to "unload your burden a moment" and "stay tranquil amid the noise and frenzy of life, remembering the peace which exists in silence".

    12.20pm

    A moment's repose is quite enough, so charge towards the Pont au Change, drinking in the beauty of the city as you head towards the Palais de Justice and Boulevard St Michel. Once you glimpse the yellow awnings of scolastic booksellers Gilbert Joseph, you are in student-land, and liable to get caught up in a demonstration at any time. If it happens, go with it - they won't know what they're protesting about, either.

    12.45pm

    Worked up a hunger? Turn left into Boulevard Saint Germain, and left again up the rue de l'Odéon, where on the corner you will find one of Paris's best restaurants, Le Comptoir du Relais (5 Carrefour de l'Odéon, +33 (0)1 44 27 07 50). Béarn-born chef Yves Camdeborde has Parisians queuing around the block for a table at his 40-seater restaurant that's disguised as an innocuous brasserie - and Parisians don't queue.

    Those seated in the little row of tables outside are given crimson blankets to keep them warm in winter, as they tuck into foie gras, truffles, coquilles saint Jacques or roast pork, finishing off with a succulent tarte tatin - all for only approximately €40 a head.

    3pm

    Heavy-stomached and light-headed from that shared bottle of Pouilly Fumé and those two (entirely unnecessary) Kir Royales, head up the Rue Casimir Delavigne towards the Jardin du Luxembourg to walk off your lunch, dropping a euro into the hat of the most literary tramp in the city as you go. This bespectacled man who sits cross-legged reading Racine out loud will doff an invisible cap with Musketeer-like elegance to acknowledge your generosity.

    4pm

    Pause for a while in the enchanted enclave of the Medici Fountain, putting your feet up and allowing yourself to be lulled into a gentle doze by the sound of running water and French mothers castigating their children, before heading, newly revived, back down the Boulevard Saint Germain.

    5.30pm

    Work your way to the most beautiful square you are ever likely to see, the Place de Furstenberg. Thomas Jefferson once lived on nearby rue Jacob, as did Delacroix, Racine, Wagner, Ingres and Hemingway - an imaginary dinner party one dreams of attending.

    6pm

    Pop into the world-famous tea shop Ladurée (21 rue Bonaparte, +33 (0)1 44 07 64 87; www.laduree.fr) for coffee and orange-flower macaroons which dissolve on the tongue, before heading towards the Île Saint-Louis, one of two islands in the Seine, across the most charming footbridge in the city, the Pont Saint-Louis.

    Stop off on your way for a browse at second-hand bookshop Shakespeare and Co (37 rue de la Bucherie, +33 (0)1 43 26 33 22), a ramshackle literary oasis which fed and watered some of the 20th century's greatest writers - and a great many mediocre ones.

    7pm

    First editions in hand, sip mulled wine at any of the pretty little bars on the Quai de Bourbon, where you can take in the sounds of the jazz band playing on the small bridge connecting the Île Saint-Louis with the Île de la Cité.

    7.30pm

    Grab a final bite to eat from any one of the cluster of restaurants on the Île Saint-Louis; they are all good, except those on the main thoroughfare which are often overpriced.

    True gluttons should buy an ice-cream to eat in the taxi en route to the Gare du Nord from Berthillon (31 rue St Louis-en-l'Île, +33 (0)1 43 54 31 61). The mangue et chocolat noir (mango and dark chocolate) is so good, the taste will stay with you, Proust-like, for the rest of your life.

    8.45pm

    Arrive at the Gare du Nord to return home on the 21:13 Eurostar to St Pancras International. As you speed quickly out of Paris into the shadowy suburbs, drift into a deep, sated sleep, dreams crackling with new ideas, resolutions, unforgettable memories and a sharpened enjoyment of life.
    What to do with the kids

    The kids may clamour to be taken to Disneyland Paris, but stay strong and turn a deaf ear. For all its grown-up style and sophistication, the French capital has far more amusements than any theme park could ever muster.

    Obviously, the big museums all have their appeal – such as the Louvre’s collection of Egyptian mummies and the Musée Rodin’s captivating sculpture garden – but there are plenty of other ways to explore the city’s art and history. Any kids who enjoy Horrible Histories will love a trip down the city’s sewers, Les Égouts de Paris (entrance on the corner of Quai d’Orsay and Place de la Resistance) or an encounter with the six million skeletons residing in its catacombs (1 avenue du Colonel Henri Rol-Tanguy, www.catacombes-de-paris.fr).
    My own children – boys aged eight and six – insist on scaling the Eiffel Tower on every visit, but the Arc de Triomphe and Notre Dame offer equally exhilarating views. If you are visiting before Christmas, don’t miss the giant, illuminated ferris wheel at the Place de la Concorde.
    In good weather, not much beats a jaunt to the Jardin d’Acclimatation in the Bois de Boulogne. With a zoo, narrow-gauge railway and hall of mirrors, there’s plenty to do for most age groups.

    How to kill 20 minutes around Gare du Nord

    Go for a quick spin around the edgy 10th arrondissement on a Vélib’ , the new Paris public rental bike (www.velib.paris.fr). There are several hire stations nearby on rue de Dunkerque. Bikes cost one euro (70p) for an hour, with a €120 deposit.

    Stock up on Beaujolais Nouveau at Route des Cepages (119 boulevard de Magenta, +33 (0) 1 42 80 45 45), a traditional wine shop that has tastings on Friday evenings. Otherwise, just gaze up at the Gare du Nord itself. Its magnificent façade is still gleaming after a recent clean-up.
    Taxi! Don't queue at the Gare du Nord, get a cab from here instead

    Rue de Maubeuge: Just around the corner from the station, where overspill taxis wait for a slot at the Gare du Nord.
    Rue de Dunkerque: Quiet rank opposite the Gare du Nord suburban station where cabs often outnumber clients.
    Junction of Rue du Faubourg: Saint-Denis and Rue La Fayette Just the place to nab a cab before it joins the station rank.
    Boulevard de Magenta: Busy thoroughfare a 100-yard walk from the station, with taxis in ready supply.
    Junction of Rue d’Abbeville and Rue de Maubeuge: A five-minute walk from the station and stuck in a one-way system heading west, but handy for cabs if you’re going to Montmartre.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  9. #29

    Default Paris on a budget...

    PARIS, France (AP) -- The perfect Paris picnic comes cheap: a crusty baguette ($1), a thick slab of Camembert ($2.50), a modest Bordeaux ($5). Take it to the sprawling park at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, spread a blanket and dine with a view that is priceless.
    Paris has more than its share of high-end luxury, but plenty of this city's famed culture and romance can come free -- or at minimal cost. There are all kinds of tricks to enjoying Paris without busting your budget.
    The opera has cheap seats, museums offer reductions, churches hold free classical concerts, walking up the Eiffel Tower is cheaper than riding the elevator -- and a good way to work off all the croissants and mousses au chocolat. Plenty of fun can be had for under $20, even in the capital of haute couture and high-end cuisine.
    Start perhaps with a stroll. Wander through the meticulously manicured Luxembourg Gardens or the elegant Place des Vosges, Paris' oldest square on the edge of the boutique-and-gallery-packed Marais district.
    A pair of comfortable shoes is key in this utterly walkable city so full of parks and monuments, stunning architecture and charming cobblestone lanes that ducking underground to the Metro means skipping sights.
    That said, public transport is excellent and cheap. A single subway or bus ride costs $1.75, while a book of 10 tickets -- a "carnet" -- is a saving at $13. There is a full-day pass -- the Carte Mobilis -- for $6.70; and a weekly pass -- Carte Hebdomadaire -- that costs $20.
    Serious sightseers should consider the "Museum and Monument Card," sold at museums and major Metro stations. It allows unlimited access to 70 of the city's attractions and lets cardholders skip lines. A one-day card is $22.
    Another cost saver is the Paris City Passport, newly minted this year by Paris' Tourism Office. The $6.20 booklet is filled with $370 in coupons for savings off admission to museums, Seine River boat cruises, city bus tours, cabarets and night clubs. It is sold at tourism offices, select train stations or online .
    To view the City of Light from above, it's tough to beat the Eiffel Tower. Skip the top level -- the lines are long and it costs $13.30 to get there. The second platform is plenty high at 380 feet; it can be reached by elevator for $9.30 or on foot -- up 704 steps -- for $4.70.
    Otherwise, for a spectacular and free Paris panorama, head to the steps of the great white Sacre Coeur basilica in Montmartre.
    After walking up a good appetite, the question arises of where to eat. For a splurge, pick up a Michelin guide and follow the stars -- but do it during the day. Michelin-starred lunch menus often run half the price of dinner. Reservations are a must, often well in advance.
    Otherwise, buy a baguette sandwich for lunch at any boulangerie or a crepe from a streetside stand. Supermarkets sell wine and cheese for one-stop picnic shopping.
    For dinner, go ethnic. Some of Paris' tastiest and most affordable food comes from its former colonies: great couscous from North Africa, hearty noodle soups from Vietnam, specialties of Senegal. Best bets are the immigrant melting pots of Belleville in northeastern Paris or the city's main Chinatown in the southeastern 13th arrondissement around Metro station Porte d'Ivry.
    For French fare, just pick a neighborhood -- the Latin Quarter, Montmartre, St. Germain des Pres, the Marais, Bastille -- and read the menus in windows. Brasseries are cheaper than bistros and offer French classics at reasonable prices with a variety of wines by the glass. Fine wines are best bought in shops -- not restaurants where markups can be enormous.
    For an outdoor aperitif, do as the French do. Take a bottle with paper cups and head to the Pont des Arts, the wooden-and-iron footbridge connecting the riverbanks between the Latin Quarter and the Louvre. In the city of romance, it remains a favorite of canoodling couples and Parisians who never tire of gazing at sunset over the Seine.
    For an elegant evening out, mingle with the tuxedo-and-gown crowd at the ballet or opera -- where these days any attire is fine. The Bastille Opera just opened a 62-person standing-room area for a mere $6.20 a head. Sales start 45 minutes before the curtain goes up, so arrive early and brace for lines. Otherwise, nosebleed seats with limited visibility start at $11. The glorious Garnier Opera, with its recently renovated grand Baroque foyer, is Paris' main ballet venue and offers velvet seats in upper booths for as low as $8.70.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  10. #30

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    A simple place, the daytime manager is a bit snooty, the night one is friendly and warm - you can get water for your noodles, and ther eis a Macs near. Two subway lines within walking distance, and you can get to almost 90% of the biger attractions with these two lines alone.

    It is really minutes walk to the Arc.



    Quote Originally Posted by petetherock View Post
    http://www.elysee-etoile-paris-hotel.com/

    Hotel Features1 minute from Champs Elysees
    A 10 minute walk from the Porte Maillot.
    Free WIFI

    Hôtel Elysée Etoile5, rue de l'Etoile
    75017 Paris - France
    Tel : +33 (0)1 43 80 22 19
    Fax : +33 (0)1 44 40 09 89
    elysee.etoile@wanadoo.fr

    Elysee Etoile Hotel is situated in the heart of Paris. The hotel is exceptionally well placed for tourists, a stone's throw from the Champs Elysees and the Arc de Triomphe. You will be within easy reach of many places of interest within Paris, (the Palais des Congres at Porte Maillot, the prestigious Haute Couture shop windows in the Triangle d'Or district, the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, etc) which you may visit, using the many direct transport possibilities.

    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  11. #31

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Get a Carnet of tickets, it's cheaper -12 euros.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  12. #32

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Hi

    planning a trip to Paris in mid-aug. would like to know if language barrier is a big issue as i heard Parisians are arrogant & some might not even reply you if though they might know english. Do i have to learn some simple/essential words & plan my route in great details to know where are the nearest toilet etc? HAHAHA

    thanks in advance for any advice!

  13. #33

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    It is always nice to know a few words, thats being culturally sensitive, and the French do have that rep.
    You can find what is hello, how much, thank you etc online, learn them and it will open doors for you - not all French are bad, and some are very helpful.
    Cheers.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  14. #34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebelicious
    Hi

    planning a trip to Paris in mid-aug. would like to know if language barrier is a big issue as i heard Parisians are arrogant & some might not even reply you if though they might know english. Do i have to learn some simple/essential words & plan my route in great details to know where are the nearest toilet etc? HAHAHA

    thanks in advance for any advice!
    When I was there the people were generally very helpful when I asked for directions and everything, just don't approach them when they are busy with their own stuff I didnt known any French when I was there and I was fine.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Thanks for the tips.

  16. #36

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    VAT claims:
    You usually need to spend 170 euros and up. Ask for a rebate on your card instead of cash. If you ask for cash, not only do you need to queue twice, the queues are long.

    If anyone is looking for Longchamp bags, they are at Printemps, and there is a duty free branch within the airport after you clear customs.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

  17. #37

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by gohjialong View Post
    When I was there the people were generally very helpful when I asked for directions and everything, just don't approach them when they are busy with their own stuff I didnt known any French when I was there and I was fine.
    Quote Originally Posted by petetherock View Post
    It is always nice to know a few words, thats being culturally sensitive, and the French do have that rep.
    You can find what is hello, how much, thank you etc online, learn them and it will open doors for you - not all French are bad, and some are very helpful.
    Cheers.
    thanks for the tips guys! will find out some of more common words... hahaha learn abit of french in sch but was pretty bad at it.

    btw, do the metro tickets of different lines cost the same? i read that a carnet cost $13. SGD or euros?

    we are on a tight budget so was thinking of staying not within the city centre but are also concerned if the savings from rent will b offset by the amt of travelling to do. i'm only staying for 2 nights :/

  18. #38

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by petetherock View Post
    VAT claims:
    You usually need to spend 170 euros and up. Ask for a rebate on your card instead of cash. If you ask for cash, not only do you need to queue twice, the queues are long.

    If anyone is looking for Longchamp bags, they are at Printemps, and there is a duty free branch within the airport after you clear customs.
    I back you up with your answers on the 170 euros and above for VAT claims and also the duty free branch of longchamp bags although there arent much variety at the airport.

  19. #39

    Default Re: Tips on France + Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebelicious View Post
    thanks for the tips guys! will find out some of more common words... hahaha learn abit of french in sch but was pretty bad at it.

    btw, do the metro tickets of different lines cost the same? i read that a carnet cost $13. SGD or euros?

    we are on a tight budget so was thinking of staying not within the city centre but are also concerned if the savings from rent will b offset by the amt of travelling to do. i'm only staying for 2 nights :/
    no point finding out the common words. i think you can pass off with 'merci' meaning thank you and you will be ok haha. thats what i did. for me i got the metro ticket for zone 1 and 2 (1 ticket for that) and i got to travel to the famous attractions of paris. its for the metro as well as the RER.

  20. #40

    Default Budget

    Friends


    When visiting Europe - budget enough.

    Europe in general is expensive. Geneva is probably the worse, but it is a nightmare for the cost conscious amongst us.

    A coffee can cost up to 5 Euros or more. A bottle of coke is about 2 Euros.

    A typical meal will set you back 10-15 Euros easily.

    Sure, you could try and stock up at the supermarket, but they are not as readily available and do note, most rooms do not even have kettles, and definitely no microwaves, so if you need to cook even instant noodles, bring all the equipment you need.

    Also, even if you are on a budget, try and keep some money and give yourself a treat. Don't starve yourself and go out, enjoy at least once or twice.

    Hotels:

    A decent one in a nice area will be under 100 Euros.
    I like the Place Charles de Gaulle Etiole area. Here, you have so many train lines to many places, and the hotels are cheaper, yet you have cheap places to eat around here.

    Also the Air France bus goes directly from Terminal 1 to stop here.

    A carnet of tickets is 12 euros (region 1).

    Admissions:

    The first Sunday of the month is free, but that means it will be extra crowded - it is better to pay IMO.

    You can get package fees that cover a fee museums, google for more details.

    Otherwise, the Lourve is 10 Euros, the Arc de Triomphe is 9.50.
    Nikon D750; FM2; FG; 55mm Micro Nikkor; 28-300 VR; 70-200 VR; Nikon V1 + 10-30mm

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